Snug Harbour Rear Range Lighthouse

Heritage Lighthouse

Carling, Ontario
Historic photograph showing Snug Harbour Rear Range Lighthouse, 1927 (© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Clifford M. Johnston, PA-056330.)
Historic photograph
(© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Clifford M. Johnston, PA-056330.)
Address : Snug Island, Carling, Ontario

Recognition Statute: Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act (S.C. 2008, c 16)
Designation Date: 2016-06-14
Dates:
  • 1893 to 1893 (Construction)
  • 1894 to 1894 (Established)

Description of Historic Place

The Snug Harbour Rear Range Lighthouse is a one-and-a-half storey dwelling with a tapered tower rising from the centre of its roof. Located at the southern tip of Snug Island and directly west of Snug Harbour in Georgian Bay, the lighthouse is ideally situated to direct marine traffic into Snug Harbour or on to Parry Sound. The combined dwelling and tower achieve a height of 14 metres (45 feet) from base to vane. The Snug Harbour Front Range Lighthouse is located on the nearby Walton Island. There are three related buildings on the site that contribute to the heritage character of the lighthouse: (1) the boathouse (1920), (2) the generator building (1920), and (3) the storage shed (circa 1960).

Character-Defining Elements

The following character-defining elements of the Snug Harbour Rear Range Lighthouse should be respected: its location on Snug Island, in Georgian Bay; its distinctive profile, consisting of a one-and-a-half storey dwelling with a wooden square-tapered tower emerging from the roof; its intact, as-built structural form, height, profile and balanced proportions; its cornice that tapers gently out to support the gallery and railing; its original square wooden lantern with pyramidal roof; its windows and door symmetrically placed on the elevations; its white siding with a horizontal oriented design; its traditional colour scheme, consisting of white for the dwelling, tower, and lantern, and red for the trim, the dwelling’s roof, and the gallery railing, and a black vertical line against a red background for the day mark on the western façade; and, its visual prominence in relation to the water and landscape.

The following character-defining elements of the related buildings should be respected: their respective built forms and proportions; their traditional colour scheme consisting of white for the walls and red for the trim and roof, and beige for the generator building; and, their contextual relationship to the lighthouse within a lightstation setting.