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National Parks

Ecological Restoration

Restoration Case Studies

This compendium of case studies is a companion to the Principles and Guidelines for Ecological Restoration in Canada’s Protected Natural Areas. The case studies are from a variety of parks and other protected natural areas across Canada and illustrate a broad range of restoration challenges and solutions. They demonstrate approaches to ecological restoration that are:

Effective in restoring and maintaining ecological integrity
Efficient in using practical and economic methods to achieve functional success
Engaging through implementing inclusive processes and by recognizing and embracing interrelationships between culture and nature
Restoration of grasslands in Kootenay National Park: 3 days, 2 weeks, and 4 months post burn Restoration of grasslands in Kootenay National Park: 3 days, 2 weeks, and 4 months post burn
© Parks Canada / A. Dibb


These case studies focus on restoration of natural heritage, including native biodiversity and ecosystem functions. At the same time, they recognize the long-standing inextricable interrelationship between humans and the environment, and the need to incorporate considerations for protection of cultural heritage. For example, at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site in British Columbia, restoration of Garry oak ecosystems opened up historical viewscapes and enhanced presentation of the site’s cultural heritage resources.

Before removal of invasive species in Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site Before removal of invasive species in Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site
© Parks Canada
After removal of invasive species in Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site After removal of invasive species in Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site
© Parks Canada


In addition, the case studies demonstrate that restoration can help connect Canadians with their special places by enhancing their understanding and appreciation of both natural and cultural heritage. Visitors and the public are given the opportunity to experience restoration first-hand by getting involved, and traditional cultural relationships with the land are restored.

Young Aboriginal dancers at the Grasslands National Park bison release ceremony Young Aboriginal dancers at the Grasslands National Park bison release ceremony
© Parks Canada

For example, in Grasslands National Park in Saskatchewan, traditional Aboriginal activities were an important element of the bison reintroduction ceremony, which was witnessed by many visitors. Opportunities for traditional spiritual and ceremonial activities in the park have helped build relationships with Aboriginal people and re-integrate nature and culture.


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