Rouge National Urban Park Initiative

Youth Workshop

Engagement of both current and future generations of stewards is critical for ensuring the Rouge Valley’s rich natural and cultural heritage is protected for the on-going benefit, education and enjoyment of Canadians. The Government of Canada recognizes the value of involving youth to gain their perspective and opinions, while nurturing their long-term stewardship and personal connection to Rouge National Urban Park and all of Canada’s treasured places.

On February 2, 2012, Parks Canada hosted a workshop with youth from the Greater Toronto Area to gain their perspective to help shape the vision and concept for Canada’s first national urban park in the Rouge Valley. For this workshop, Parks Canada gathered youth from area organizations and academic facilities, at the high school, college and university levels. Approximately 65 youth delegates attended the workshop, with their participation being facilitated by leaders from various organizations and communities including, the University of Toronto Scarborough student body, Centennial College student body, Dunbarton High School, Malvern Family Resource Centre, East Scarborough Storefront, YMCA-GTA Youth advisory committee and 4H-Ontario.

Youth Workshop 
Youth Workshop
© Parks Canada

Youth Workshop 
Youth Workshop
© Parks Canada

Recently Parks Canada has been collaborating with the University of Toronto Scarborough to achieve common goals related to youth engagement and, as such, hosted this dynamic young group on the university campus. As only a first engagement activity for this important target group, more opportunities will be provided to involve them in the broader consultation phase to come.

To get a taste of what we heard from youth participants, please see these documents:

Youth Workshop Summary (PDF : 315 Kb)
Youth Workshop Report (PDF : 1.04 Mb)

Youth workshop participants in action
 Youth workshop participants in action
© Parks Canada

 

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