Archaeology

Mandate


Southeast Brook Falls at Gros Morne National Park of Canada (N.L.) Southeast Brook Falls at Gros Morne National Park of Canada (N.L.)
© Parks Canada / Lynch, W. / 01.11.03.04(31) / 1992

Parks Canada ensures that archaeological resources are protected and managed appropriately in accordance with its mandate, Cultural Resource Management Policy, Guidelines for the Management of Archaeological Resources and management directives.

The Archaeological Resource Management section is a unit of the National Historic Sites Directorate that provides national leadership and strategic direction to Parks Canada’s archaeological function. The section also maintains effective liaison with Parks Canada service centres to suport professional standards and training needs; develops national operational policies, guidelines, standards, information systems and operational tools to identify, protect, manage and monitor Parks Canada’s terrestrial and underwater archaeological resources; and provides scholarly research papers and expert advice on archaeological and Aboriginal subjects to suport the Historical Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

Archaeologists, material culture researchers, collection managers and conservators at the Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Western and Northern Service Centres provide the functional expertise to help understand, protect, display and manage the archaeological resources.

The management units are responsible for the planning and implementation of activities related to the management of archaeological resources located in Parks Canada heritage areas. The units can access the expert archaeological advice available in the service centres as well as generous advice on policy from the Archaeological Resource Management section.

Ensuring adequate management of archaeological resources consists mainly of preventing or reducing the impact of anything that can affect the historical value of archaeological sites and collections. Resources are subject to threats from human activities, natural forces and even improper storage or display. Through research, impact assessment, mitigation and monitoring as well as increasing public awareness, Parks Canada can reduce the threats or their adverse impacts on archaeological resources.