Thousand Islands National Park of Canada

Snowshoe Hike
Snowshoeing is easier than hiking when the snow is deep and is accessible to nearly everyone.
© Parks Canada

Snowshoeing

Don't let the chill of winter keep you cooped up indoors. Put on a pair of snowshoes to enjoy the hush of a fresh snowfall and the delicate prints of travelling animals. Snowshoeing is easier than hiking when the snow is deep and is accessible to nearly everyone.

Park trails at the Jones Creek property vary in difficulty from an easy 20-minute walk to a moderate 2-hour hike and connect to each other for a longer trip.

Plan Your Trip

  • Find the trailhead on the 1000 Islands Parkway, north of Brown's Bay.
  • Find a trail map on our facilities and services page or pick up a trail brochure at the trailhead. The trail brochure outlines the length, level of difficulty, scenic lookouts, and features of each trail.
  • A composting toilet is available a quick 5-minute walk from the parking lot.
  • Trails are open year round for hiking, snowshoeing, wildlife and bird watching, and geocaching.
  • Want to dig deeper? Try a guided hike with a park interpreter and uncover the secrets of your surroundings.

Fees

  • Seasonal and one-time parking passes can be purchased. Permits are valid at Thousand Islands National Park's Mallorytown Landing, Jones Creek, and Landon Bay properties.
    • Obtain permits from park interpreters at the Mallorytown Landing Visitor Centre with cash, debit, credit or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada.
    • Otherwise, self-register at the green deposit box located at the trailhead. Fees can be paid by cash, credit card or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada. Signs on the deposit boxes outline the fee details and instructions for self-registration.
  • See our park fees page for a full list of fees.
  • Fees remain in the park and are used to improve facilities and services.

For Your Comfort and Safety

  • Black legged ticks, potential carriers of Lyme disease and Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, are common in Eastern Ontario and Thousand Islands National Park. Please visit our Ticks and Your Health page for more information on how to protect yourself.
  • Even the best behaved dog can run into trouble when off leash. Keeping your dog on a leash protects both your dog and any other animal that you may encounter. Wild animals can become aggressive when confronted and other dogs may not be as friendly as yours. Additionally, other visitors may be uncomfortable with or afraid of dogs.
  • The water of the St. Lawrence River and other surface water in the area may carry bacteria. Water should be filtered and then treated or boiled before drinking or bring your own drinking water. For more information regarding drinking water please refer to Health Canada’s website.
  • Be sure that you are well prepared and that you have all the right gear to make every outing safe and enjoyable. Visit AdventureSmart for more details.
  • See our Visitor Safety page for complete park rules and regulations.