Fundy National Park of Canada

Visitor Safety

The adventures to be had in national parks also hold dangers. It is your responsibility to be prepared and equipped for emergencies. To protect both you and the Park resources, please observe the following:

AdventureSmart  is a national program dedicated to encouraging Canadians and visitors to Canada to “Get informed and go outdoors.”

Wildlife

To fully enjoy encounters with wild animals, it is important that everyone respect the regulations. Please keep your distance. Feeding wildlife is strictly forbidden. Animals that are fed frequently may start to expect handouts and become aggressive towards people. Keep your campsite clean. Put food in the trunk of your car.

While traveling on Highway 114, especially between dusk and dawn, beware of deer and moose emerging from the forest. Drive with caution.

Swimming

Swimming in one of the Park's rivers can be enjoyable, but dangerous if you're not careful.

  • do not swim where the current is strong;
  • always swim with a buddy;
  • never dive into a river. Rocks may be hidden just below the surface.
  • Forty-Five River bridge pools are closed.

Fires

Campfires are only permitted in the fireplaces provided.

Please don't use twigs, leaves, or bark to start your fire. They act as mulch and provide food for plants. Make your own kindling from your firewood, which may be purchased at the campground where fires are permitted. Charcoal barbecues may be used, but dump your cold ashes in a fireplace or garbage container.

River Crossings

Several trails in the Park require fording rivers. When the water is high, crossing the river can be dangerous. Park wardens monitor water levels and close crossings when conditions are hazardous. At these times, signs are posted at the trailhead to indicate the closure. If you are unsure about water conditions, don't take a chance.

Drinking Water

Assume all surface water is unfit to drink unless first boiled for 10 minutes or adequately filtered.

Shellfish Harvesting

Shellfish (clams, mussels, and other bivalve molluscs) found on the intertidal shores adjacent to Fundy National Park may not be safe for use as food. Law prohibits fishing for or possessing shellfish in this area and persons doing so are subject to prosecution under the Fisheries Act and Regulations.

Firearms

The use of firearms in national parks is prohibited. Guns must be unloaded and encased or dismantled.

Collecting

Under the National Parks Act it is illegal to disturb or collect any plants, animals, rocks, shells or artifacts. By complying with this regulation you will be helping to preserve Fundy's beauty for future visitors.

Wildlife Diseases

Both the raccoon strain of rabies and the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus exist in areas just south of New Brunswick and could spread into the province this year. Report immediately the location of any animal acting abnormally or found dead of no apparent cause. Protect yourself from mosquitoes, a carrier of West Nile Virus, with repellants.

Planning a safe visit to a national park