Mount Revelstoke National Park

Royal Visits to Mount Revelstoke

 Map of “Mt. Revelstoke Motor Road,” July 29, 1912
© Parks Canada

In 1908, the City of Revelstoke broke a trail to the summit of Mount Revelstoke adjacent to the city, and later completed trails to some of the alpine lakes. At the time, the alpine meadow was referred to as “Victoria Park.”

Historic image of the gateway to Mount Revelstoke National Park
Park Gate / © Revelstoke Museum and Archives - Dickey Collection


In 1914, Mount Revelstoke became Canada’s 7th national park after considerable advocacy by local residents, in recognition of its unspoiled mountain scenery, its sub-alpine wildflower meadows, and its potential for recreational use. The road to the summit was built between 1911 and 1927.

 1916, The Duke of Connaught and plaque commemorating his visit
© Revelstoke Museum and Archives



Commemorative plaque, Parks Canada

© Parks Canada




July 28, 1916 - His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught, the Duchess of Connaught and their daughter Princess Patricia visited Revelstoke. Within five minutes of their arrival by train, they were driven 11 miles to the end of the completed Mount Revelstoke National Park “auto road,” where they proclaimed it had “scenery finest on the continent” and the Duke planted a commemorative post. The Duke was the Governor General of Canada, and the uncle of King George V, who reigned from 1910 to 1936.

The Royal party were highly delighted with their trip, His Highness terming it as ‘magnificent, and one of the most beautiful and scenic mountain roads in Canada, and which would be a wonderful asset to Revelstoke.”
- Revelstoke Review newspaper



1916, The Mount Revelstoke National Park gate is festooned for the Royal visit
© Revelstoke Museum and Archives


“This Post Placed by His Royal Highness The Duke of Connaught, July 28, 1916, 3921 Feet”

© Revelstoke Museum and Archives

 “This Post Placed by His Royal Highness The Duke of Connaught, July 28, 1916, 3921 Feet”
© Revelstoke Museum and Archives




July 30, 1918 - two years after the first Royal visit, HRH Prince Arthur of Connaught, the son of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, visited Revelstoke, and planted a post in Mount Revelstoke National Park.

“The party arrived at the end of the motor road, where the ceremony of placing the post was conducted, His Royal Highness officiating, and remarking that the post was placed nearly 1,300 feet higher than that of his father two years ago, which was at a height of 3,921 feet.”
- Revelstoke Review



1919, Prince of Wales
© Parks Canada



September 1919 - there was great excitement in Revelstoke over the visit of the Prince of Wales. The Prince was the son of the reigning King George V and was first in line for the throne. He was driven up Mount Revelstoke where he unveiled a plaque.

On seeing the view from the park, the Prince of Wales “readily understood how the Duke of Connaught could express himself as being enraptured with the surroundings in the Dominion Park.
- Revelstoke Review

The ladies’ tent at Bridge Creek, where tea was served, looked very pretty, being gaily decorated with flags, bunting and evergreens. The ladies are to be congratulated for their excellent war-time spread.”
- Revelstoke Review

After the afternoon tea presided over by the Women’s Canadian Club, the Prince expressed a desire to watch a movie, and he and his aide walked 6 miles down the mountain to attend the Rex Theatre. Cassie McKinnon was working at the theatre and sold the Prince his ticket and kept the coin he used to pay as a souvenir (she replaced his payment with a coin of her own).

3 photos showing the 1919 commemorative plaque
1919, Royal visit commemorative plaque - “Dominion of Canada, Revelstoke Park, Dedicated September 20, 1919, by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, for the Benefit, Advantage and Enjoyment of the People of Canada.”
© Parks Canada


1919, Royal tea tent at Bridge Creek, Mount Revelstoke National Park
© Revelstoke Museum and Archives


1927, Royal visit commemorative plaque
© Parks Canada


August 17, 1927 - the Prince of Wales returned with his brother Prince George, the future Duke of Kent, to officially open the mountain highway that is now known as “Meadows in the Sky Parkway” in Mount Revelstoke National Park. A special dais with the Prince’s insignia was created for the occasion.

“If I remember rightly,” humorously observed the Prince, “my visit was marked on that occasion by an informal descent of your mountain, and an equally informal visit to your movie hall.”
-
Revelstoke Review



1959, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in Revelstoke, Behind are Shirley Styles and B.R. “Bud” Styles, Superintendent of Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks
© Revelstoke Museum and Archives

July 16, 1959 – Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip arrived in Revelstoke by train and immediately presented to them were the Mayor of Revelstoke, Mr. Hardman and his wife along with the Superintendent of Mount Revelstoke National Park, Mr. Styles and his wife. The Royal couple then went by Cadillac – which was flown from Chicago to Penticton and then driven to Revelstoke for the occasion – to Mount Revelstoke National Park. At the first lookout, the Royal pair looked over the valley for 20 minutes. They showed an interest in the panorama view of the city, Eagle Pass and the sea of mountains.