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Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland National Historic Site of Canada

Did you know?

1. Did you know that Fort Beauséjour, re-named Fort Cumberland in 1755, quickly became a centre for the first Acadian Deportation?

17th & 18th  century ruins of fort
17th & 18th century ruins of fort. Fort-Beauséjour-Fort Cumberland NHSC.
© Parks Canada

Acting Governor Charles Lawrence was angered that some Acadian inhabitants had taken up arms against the British in the attack on Fort Beauséjour in 1755. Although the French commander declared he had forced the Acadians to help defend the fort or suffer death, the claim was dismissed by the Halifax administration. The Nova Scotia Council decided on June 25,1755 to remove all Acadians from the Chignecto region. This was to be the first step in what would eventually become an overall deportation of Acadians from the entire Maritime region.


2. Did you know that Fort Beauséjour was one of the first known pentagonal five-bastioned forts in North America?

Aerial photoof fort.
Aerial photo of Fort Beauséjour-Fort Cumberland NHSC
© Parks Canada

Designed by Gaspard de Léry, a military engineer from Québec using Sébastien Vauban’s principles for fortification design, this star-shaped fort overlooking the Bay of Fundy was constructed by the French in 1751 to defend their interests in the Isthmus of Chignecto.


3. Did you know that the bronze bell on display at Fort Beauséjour - Fort Cumberland National Historic Site dates back to 1734?

Bronze bell on display at fort
Bronze bell on display at Fort Beauséjour-Fort Cumberland NHSC
© Parks Canada

Cast in Rochefort, France in 1734, the bronze bell was first installed in the church in the village of Beaubassin and later in the church of Saint-Louis, at Beauséjour. It was removed when the missionary Jean-Louis LeLoutre decided to burn the church because of the British advance on the fort in 1755. After the Acadians of the area were deported, later settlers installed the bell in an Anglican church built at Mount Whatley around 1795. That church was remodeled around 1821, then later replaced by the new St. Mark's church in 1880 where the bell was once again hung, until it was donated to the Fort Beauséjour Museum.


4. Did you know that… ?

18th century British Trenches
18th century British Trenches Fort-Beauséjour-Fort Cumberland NHSC
© Parks Canada

If Fort Cumberland had fallen to the American and local rebel attacks during the American Revolution in 1776, Nova Scotia (part of which became New Brunswick in 1784) may have become the 14th American colony?


5. Did you know that...?

 Dr. John Clarence Webster(medallion)
Dr. John Clarence Webster (medallion) Fort-Beauséjour-Fort Cumberland NHSC
© Parks Canada

Dr. John Clarence Webster, the historian who worked for the creation of Fort Beauséjour - Fort Cumberland National Historic Site in 1920 had previously been a renowned medical doctor in Edinburgh, Montreal and Chicago and was among the earliest surgeons to use rubber gloves to prevent infection?