A National Park Proposal on Bathurst Island

Learn More

Newsletters

Park Feasibility Studies

To help develop and inform decisions about this park proposal, as well as to determine a potential boundary, a number of park feasibility studies were conducted in the Bathurst Island area between 1995 and 2001. The studies looked at mineral and energy resources, archaeology, wildlife and traditional knowledge.

  • Economic and Strategic Value of Oil and Gas Potential Identified in the Bathurst MERA. (Morrell and Smith, 2001)
    Printable version : English (PDF, 42 Kb) | Inuktitut (PDF, 316 Kb)

  • Mineral and Energy Resource Assessment of Bathurst Island Area, Nunavut. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 3714 (Anglin and Harrison, 1999)

  • North Bathurst Island Archaeological Project: Final Report. (McGhee, 1997)
    Printable version : English (PDF, 646 Kb) | Inuktitut (PDF, 964 Kb)

  • Peary Caribou – A Case for a National Park on Northern Bathurst Island. (Miller, 2001)
    Printable version : English (PDF, 319 Kb) | Inuktitut (PDF, 495 Kb)

  • Summary of a Recent Study of Microsatellite Variation In the Muskox Ovibos moschatus and Notes on Importance of Bathurst Island to Peary Caribou Rangifer tarandus pearyi and Muskox Persistence In the High Arctic. (van Coeverden de Groot, 2001)
    Printable version : English (PDF, 460 Kb) | Inuktitut (PDF, 713 Kb)

  • Travelling to Bathurst Island: Interviews from Resolute Bay. (Nunavut Tusaavut, 1997)
    Printable version: English (PDF, 581 Kb) | Inuktitut (PDF, 697 Kb)

Maps

Mineral and Energy Resource Assessment (MERA) Process

Media Room

Other Important Links


Purple saxifrage flowers in full bloom on arctic tundra.
A pair of Peary caribou look out over the tundra landscape. © M. Manseau, Parks Canada
A muskox stands alone on the arctic tundra.
The shining sun hangs like a brilliant ball low in the blue sky above three people standing on flat snow covered ground that stretches off into the distance.

Note: To read the PDF version you need Adobe Acrobat Reader on your system.

If the Adobe download site is not accessible to you, you can download Acrobat Reader from an accessible page.

If you choose not to use Acrobat Reader you can have the PDF file converted to HTML or ASCII text by using one of the conversion services offered by Adobe.