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Heritage Lighthouses of Canada

Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site of Canada
© Parks Canada

Designated Lighthouses

The Minister responsible for Parks Canada designates heritage lighthouses on behalf of the Government of Canada.

To learn more about processes related to the evaluation and designation of petitioned lighthouses, please visit our Evaluation & Designation page.

To learn which lighthouses were petitioned to be considered for heritage designation under the Act, you can access province-by-province listings that are available from our Petitioned Lighthouses page.

Discover heritage lighthouses!

* To date, there have been no heritage lighthouse designations in the indicated province.

Heritage lighthouses in British Columbia

Active Pass

Location: Mayne Island, British Columbia

Built in 1969, the Active Pass Lighthouse is a 13.7 metre (45 feet) tall, cylindrical, concrete structure topped by an octagonal metal lantern. It is one of the “apple core” lighthouses, a popular design on the West Coast at the end of the 1960s and early 1970s. It is located on the north eastern extremity of Mayne Island in the Georgia Strait.

Boat Bluff

Location: Sarah Island, Kitimat-Stikine, British Columbia

Originally established in 1907, the Boat Bluff Lighthouse is situated within a picturesque lightstation setting against the rugged backdrop of the Pacific Northwest mountains and forest. The light guides vessels through a heavily trafficked portion of the Inside Passage.

Cape Beale

Location: Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District, British Columbia

Built in 1958, the Cape Beale Lighthouse stands on the treacherous coastline of Vancouver Island, 60 metres above the Pacific Ocean in an isolated and heavily forested environment within the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Known for its association with several significant shipwrecks and life rescues by its lightkeepers, is an excellent example of the aids to navigation system.

Cape Mudge

Location: Quadra Island; Campbell River, British Columbia

The Cape Mudge Lighthouse is a tapered, octagonal, reinforced-concrete tower surmounted by an octagonal lantern. Located on the southwestern-most coast of Quadra Island at the southern entrance of the Discovery Passage and constructed in 1916, it is the second lighthouse on the site, having replaced the original lighthouse built in 1898.

Carmanah Point

Location: Cowichan Valley Regional District, British Columbia

Built in 1922, the Carmanah Point lighthouse is a tapered, octagonal reinforced concrete tower, recalling the classically-inspired tripartite division of base, shaft, and capital. Located on a point cleared from extremely dense rainforest, 45 metres above high water, the station is within the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and is accessible to hikers of the West Coast Trail.

Dryad Point

Location:Central Coast, British Columbia

The Dryad Point Lighthouse is a square-tapered, reinforced concrete tower that measures 7.3 metres (24 feet) in height. This lighthouse provides a very good illustration of the lightkeeping tradition, as the lightstation has always been maintained by a lightkeeper since its establishment in 1899.

East Point (Saturna Island)

Location: Saturna Island, British Columbia

Established 125 years ago, the East Point lightstation on Saturna Island was the first to mark the intricate channel between the Juan de Fuca and Georgia Straits. The East Point heritage lighthouse designation includes the former fog alarm building which has been adapted for use as an interpretive centre on Saturna Island’s rich history.

Egg Island

Location: Port Hardy, British Columbia

The Egg Island Lighthouse is a tall, square tapered, steel frame skeleton tower, located on an island of the same name which, from a certain distance, is said to resemble a hen’s egg on the horizon. The designation includes seven ancillary buildings showcasing traditional red and white exterior colour schemes.

Entrance Island

Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia

This round, “apple core” lighthouse, guides mariners into the entrance of Nanaimo Harbour. Each day, thousands of people on ferries, cruise ships, shipping vessels, recreational boats, and floatplanes pass by the Entrance Island Lighthouse.

Estevan Point

Location: Estevan Point, Vancouver Island, British Columbia

The Estevan Point Lighthouse is a 30.5 metre (100 feet) tall, white, octagonal tower of reinforced concrete comprised of a central column surrounded by eight immense flying buttresses and surmounted by a gallery topped by a red circular metal lantern. It is located at the southern extremity of the Hesquiat Peninsula on Vancouver Island’s rugged and remote western coast.

Fisgard, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Colwood, British Columbia

The Fisgard Lighthouse is a 17.1-metre (56 feet) tapered, cylindrical tower surmounted by a multi-faceted lantern and attached to a two-storey keeper’s dwelling. Constructed in 1859-1860 to mark the entrance to Esquimalt Harbour, it is the first and oldest lighthouse on Canada’s Pacific Coast.

Green Island

Location: Prince Rupert, British Columbia

The Green Island Lighthouse is an octagonal, tapered, reinforced concrete tower surmounted by an octagonal lantern. As British Columbia’s northernmost lighthouse, just 5 kilometres from the Alaskan border, it is the first notable landmark that is seen as marine traffic enters Canada.

Langara Point

Location: Village of Masset, British Columbia

The Langara Point Lighthouse is located on the north-west tip of Langara Island and is an excellent example of a tapered hexagonal ribbed reinforced-concrete tower.

McInnes Island

Location: McInnes Island, British Columbia

The McInnes Island Lighthouse is a white rectangular multiuse concrete building with the lighttower built into one corner. Located on Milbanke Sound, the lighthouse is a major coastal light that guides traffic headed to the aluminum smelter at Kitimat.

Merry Island

Location: Merry Island and Sunshine Coast, British Columbia

The Merry Island Lighthouse consists of a square base, with a tower (12 metres (40 feet) in height) rising from the corner of the building. Two red maple leaves, sculpted in relief, add to the visual interest of the lighthouse.

Nootka

Location: Yuquot, Vancouver Island, British Columbia

The Nootka Lighthouse is a square, galvanized-steel tower surrounded by a steel skeleton tower originally designed to support the lantern gallery and a wooden daymark. Built on San Rafael Island as a replacement lighthouse in 1958, the Nootka heritage lighthouse is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island at the entrance to Nootka Sound, overlooking Friendly Cove.

Pachena Point

Location: Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District, British Columbia

The Pachena Point Lighthouse, a major coastal light on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island, is a wooden, octagonal tower and supports a First Order Fresnel lens. In 2007, Pachena Point was one of five Canadian lighthouses featured in a stamp series released by Canada Post.

Pulteney Point

Location: Port McNeill, British Columbia

The Pulteney Point Lighthouse is a very good example of early modernism applied to lighthouse design with its square concrete lighttower rising from the corner of a flat-roofed, single-storey, square concrete fog-alarm building. Built in 1943, this square, concrete building replaced the 1905 combined lighthouse-dwelling.

Sheringham Point

Location: Shirley, British Columbia

The Sheringham Point Lighthouse has stood on the west coast of Vancouver Island since 1912. The white hexagonal, reinforced concrete tower guides vessels as they enter the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which provides access from the Pacific Ocean to significant ports, including Victoria and Vancouver.

Trial Islands

Location: Oak Bay, British Columbia

The Trial Islands Lighthouse, built in 1970 to replace the original lighthouse erected in 1906, is a white, cylindrical, reinforced-concrete lighthouse topped by a red aluminum lantern and gallery. The Trial Islands Lighthouse stands 13 metres (42 feet) tall and is located on the southeast point of the larger of the two Trial Islands.

Triple Islands, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Skeena-Queen Charlotte A, British Columbia

The Triple Islands Lighthouse is an octagonal, reinforced concrete tower measuring 23 metres (76 feet) high. It is attached to the corner of a square, three-storey, and reinforced concrete structure that serves as the keeper’s dwelling and equipment building. The lighthouse is recognized nationally as one of the most hazardous construction projects in Canadian maritime history, which led to its designation as a national historic site.

Heritage lighthouses in Ontario

Bois Blanc Island, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Amherstburg, Ontario

The Bois Blanc Island Lighthouse is a white circular tapered stone lighthouse built in 1836 and is located on the southern tip of the island at the juncture of the Detroit River and Lake Erie. The Bois Blanc Island Lighthouse and Blockhouse National Historic Site of Canada is managed by Parks Canada.

Flowerpot Island

Location: Tobermory, Ontario

The Flowerpot Island Lighthouse is a square, tapered, steel tower surmounted by two unenclosed lights. The present Flowerpot Island Lighthouse was built in 1969. The lighthouse supports the tourism industry associated with Flowerpot Island, which is a major attraction for boaters due to its “flowerpot” rock structure.

Lamb Island

Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario

The Lamb Island Lighthouse is a four-sided, five-sectioned tapered steel tower rising to a height of 13.6 metres (45 feet). The lighthouse was built in 1961 and is the second lighthouse on the site. The Lamb Island Lighthouse and its related buildings are highly visible from land and from water and they reinforce the dramatic maritime setting of the area.

Mohawk Island

Location: Dunnville, Ontario

The Mohawk Island Lighthouse is an excellent example of the development of navigational aids on Lake Erie. It is closely associated with the early history of Welland Canal, as it was specifically erected to warn of the dangers of an off-shore shoal and to direct traffic to and from the southern end of the canal.

McNab Point

Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON

The McNab Point Lighthouse is an 8.5 metre (28 feet) square wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by an iron lantern and a cylindrical ventilator. Constructed in 1877 as part of a major harbour improvement project, it was relocated from the northern tip of Horseshoe Bay to its present location on McNab Point in 1901.

Point Clark, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Huron-Kinloss, Ontario

The Point Clark Lighthouse is a slightly tapered circular tower, 26.5 metre (87 feet) tall, constructed of whitewashed limestone. It is capped by a cast-iron lantern with 12 glass sides and a cast-iron dome. Commissioned in 1859, it is one of six imperial towers built on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay.

Port Dover, West Pier

Location: Port Dover, Ontario

The Port Dover West Pier Lighthouse is a square-tapered, wooden tower surmounted by a square lantern that is prominently located at the end of the west pier of the entrance to Port Dover Harbour, on Lake Erie. This heritage lighthouse has been, almost since its construction, an emblem of Port Dover’s maritime character and dependence on Lake Erie.

Prince Edward Point

Location: Prince Edward County, South Marysburgh Township, Ontario

The Prince Edward Point Lighthouse is a square-tapered wooden lighthouse with an attached dwelling. Built in 1881, today this lighthouse is a recognized community landmark at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory as the main feature of the Observatory’s logo.

Saugeen River Front Range

Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON

The Saugeen River Front Range Lighthouse is a 9.5 metre (31 feet) square wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by a metal railed gallery and a wooden lantern. Located on Lake Huron on the end of a pier extending westward from the north side of the mouth of the Saugeen River in the community of Southampton, it and the nearly identical rear range light located 750 metres to the east were constructed in 1903.

Saugeen River Rear Range

Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON

The Saugeen River Rear Range Lighthouse is a 9.5 metre (31 feet) square, wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by a metal railed gallery and a wooden lantern. Located on a rise of land on the north side of the Saugeen River in the community of Southampton, it and the nearly identical front range light located 750 metres to the west were constructed in 1903.

Scotch Bonnet Island

Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario

Built in 1856, the lighthouse formerly served as a hazard avoidance light to warn ships travelling through Lake Ontario of the potential danger of the small Scotch Bonnet Island and the nearby shoals.

Walpole Island Lower A32

Location: Walpole Island, Ontario

Walpole Island Lower A32 is a square-tapered, reinforced-concrete lighthouse with no lantern. It stands approximately 5.6 metres (18.4 feet) tall and features a projecting sill and shallow inset panels that add a degree of elegance and visual interest to the tower. Serving as a navigational aid, it is strongly associated with the international through-traffic traversing the St. Clair River between Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair.

Walpole Island Upper A34

Location: Walpole Island, Ontario

Walpole Island Upper A34 is a square-tapered, reinforced-concrete lighthouse with no lantern. It stands approximately 5.4 metres (17.7 feet) tall and features a projecting sill and shallow inset panels that add a degree of elegance and visual interest to the tower. Serving as a navigational aid, it is strongly associated with the international through-traffic traversing the St. Clair River between Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair.

Windmill Point, Battle of the Windmill National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Prescott, ON

The Windmill Point Lighthouse (also known as Battle of the Windmill Lighthouse and Windmill Tower) is an18.9 metres (62 feet) round, tapered, stone tower crowned with a cast iron lantern. It is located on a height of land near the town of Prescott, where it overlooks the old King’s Highway and the St. Lawrence River. Initially built as a windmill in ca. 1832, it was the site of the Battle of the Windmill during the Rebellion of 1837-38. In 1872, it was converted to a lighthouse and became operational by 1874, remaining in service for over a century.

Heritage lighthouses in Quebec

Île aux Perroquets

Location: Longue-Pointe-de-Mingan, Quebec

The Îles aux Perroquets Lighthouse is located on the Îles aux Perroquets, at the western extremity of the Mingan Islands in Quebec and is located within the Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve of Canada. The lighthouse is a three-storey white tapered octagonal reinforced concrete tower capped by an octagonal red fibreglass lantern and topped with a decorative roof cover.

Île du Havre aux Maisons

Location: Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec

The Île du Havre aux Maisons Lighthouse, also known as Cape Alright Lighthouse, is a wooden, square tapered tower that measures 8.5 metres (28 feet). Built in 1928, it stands atop 20-metre-high red sand cliffs on Cape Alright at the eastern extremity of Île du Havre aux Maisons.

Île du Pot à l’Eau-de-Vie

Location: Kamouraska/Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec

Built in 1861, the Île du Pot à l’Eau-de-Vie Lighthouse is the last combined lighthouse and dwelling still standing on a St. Lawrence River island. It comprises a 30-foot high cylindrical tower that rises from the centre of the lightkeeper’s residence. The lighthouse is a major symbol of local tourism owing to its architecture, its unique design, and its current role as a bed and breakfast.

Pilier de Pierre

Location: Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, Quebec

The Pilier de Pierre Lighthouse is a circular stone tower topped by a gallery and lantern with a red cupola. The lighthouse stands 18.3 metres (60 feet) tall on a narrow rocky islet, one of the Piliers Islands in the middle of the St. Lawrence River. It has undergone very little change since its construction in 1843 and remains operational, warning vessels of the dangerous reefs in the waterway.

Pointe-au-Père, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Rimouski, Quebec

The Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse consists of a central octagonal tower made of reinforced concrete, supported by eight concrete flying buttresses that are attached to the tower at each floor level. The lighthouse is 32.9 metres (108 feet) tall and measures 3.35 metres (11 feet) in diameter. The lighthouse is an example of an architectural style that is unique to Canada. The Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse National Historic Site of Canada is managed by Parks Canada in partnership with the Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père.

Heritage Lighthouses in New Brunswick

Cape Jourimain

Location: Botsford, New Brunswick

The Cape Jourimain Lighthouse is a tapered, octagonal, wood-frame tower that was built in 1869. It measures 15.5 metres (51 feet) and is located at the narrowest section of the Northumberland Strait. Located just off the coast of New Brunswick and within the Cape Jourimain Nature Centre, the lighthouse is highly visible from the Confederation Bridge that connects Prince Edward Island to the mainland.

Machias Seal Island

Location: Grand Manan, New Brunswick

Built in 1914, Machias Seal Island Lighthouse is a tapered octagonal reinforced concrete tower measuring 19.8 metres (65 feet) tall. The Machias Seal Island Lighthouse is also a symbol of Canada’s claim to ownership of the island itself, with lightkeepers stationed there for sovereignty purposes.

Heritage lighthouses in Nova Scotia

Bear River

Location: Bear River, Digby, Nova Scotia

The Bear River Lighthouse is a wooden, square-tapered tower that measures 9.8 metres (32 feet). Located in a wooded area on the western shore of the mouth of Bear River, the lighthouse marks the entrance to Bear River from the Annapolis Basin. Built in 1905, it is the first lighthouse on the site. Due to its proximity to the world-renowned Bay of Fundy, the Bear River Lighthouse is highly valued in the small coastal community of Digby.

Boars Head

Location: Digby, Nova Scotia

Built in 1957, the Boars Head Lighthouse measures 11.6 metres (39 feet) and is a square, tapered, wood frame tower. The lighthouse sits on Long Island, 28 metres (93 feet) above the Petit Passage, a narrow pass that connects the Bay of Fundy to St. Mary’s Bay, and is highly visible from the water below.

Cape George

Location: Antigonish County, Nova Scotia

The Cape George Lighthouse is an octagonal, tapered, reinforced-concrete lighthouse built in 1968. The lighthouse measures 13.7 metres (45 feet) and stands 123 metres (404 feet) above the water, on a wooded bluff overlooking Ballantyne Cove, and its position at the top of the bluff enables it to guide vessels through the Northumberland Strait, as well as into St. George’s Bay.

Coldspring Head

Location: Northport, Nova Scotia

The Coldspring Head Lighthouse is an 11-metre (35 feet) square, tapered, wooden lighthouse surmounted by a superimposed gallery and a red hexagonal lantern. Constructed in 1889, it features a classically inspired frieze, comprised of a series of ornate brackets below the lantern gallery.

Neil Harbour

Location: Victoria County, Nova Scotia

The Neil Harbour Lighthouse is a square, tapered, wooden tower that measures 10.4 metres (34 feet). Built in 1899, the lighthouse was constructed to guide ships into Neil’s Harbour, a naturally protected bay. The Neil Harbour Lighthouse is highly valued by the nearby community of Neil’s Harbour. The residents consider the lighthouse to be a part of their historical and municipal identity.

Pictou Island South

Location: Pictou Island, Nova Scotia

Built in 1907, the Pictou Island South Lighthouse is a square, tapered, wooden lighthouse with a square lantern. With only a few public buildings on the island and as the last remaining lighthouse, the Pictou Island South Lighthouse is considered very important and is highly valued by the small community of permanent residents.

Port Mouton

Location: Port Mouton, Nova Scotia

The Port Mouton Lighthouse is a wooden square tapered tower that measures 7.5 metres (25 feet). Built in 1937, it replaced the original Port Mouton light that had stood on the site since 1873. The lighthouse guides vessels into the small Port Mouton harbour and is highly valued by the nearby community of Port Mouton.

Prim Point

Location: Digby, Nova Scotia

The Prim Point Lighthouse is a 13.9 metre (46 feet) tall tower with an attached fog alarm building. Built in 1964, it sits in a wooded area overlooking the rocky cliffs on the west point of Digby Gut at the narrow opening of the Annapolis Basin in the Bay of Fundy. For two centuries, there has been a light at Prim Point to guide mariners from the Bay of Fundy to the Annapolis Basin.

Queensport

Location: Rook Island, Nova Scotia

Built in 1936, the Queensport Lighthouse combines a lighthouse and keeper’s dwelling, a popular design for lighthouses in remote areas. The two-storey, wood frame residence is surmounted by a square lantern which is accessible from the second floor of the dwelling. The lighthouse is located on Rook Island, a small island off the shore of Queensport harbour, in Chedabucto Bay.

Schafner Point

Location: County of Annapolis, Nova Scotia

The Schafner Point Lighthouse is a 13 metre (43 feet) square-tapered, wooden tower surmounted by a superimposed gallery and a red octagonal iron lantern. Constructed in 1885, it is the first lighthouse on the site but the second navigational aid erected on the Digby Gut–Annapolis Basin water corridor. It is located 11 km downstream from Annapolis Royal on the north side of the Annapolis Basin.

St. Paul Island Southwest

Location: Dingwall, Cape Breton NS

The St. Paul Island Southwest Lighthouse is a prefabricated, cast-iron, cylindrical tower surmounted by a 12-sided iron lantern. It was built to warn vessels away from the dangerous St. Paul Island in the Cabot Strait with a flashing light that was visible to a distance of 18 nautical miles. It illustrates the importance and ingenuity of the Dominion Lighthouse Depot and the Canadian Coast Guard in providing a marine aids to navigation program in Canadian waters.

Terence Bay

Location: Terence Bay, Nova Scotia

The Terence Bay Lighthouse is an eight metre (26 feet) high square, tapered, wooden tower topped by an electric fixed light. Built in 1903, it replaced the original pole light that was erected in 1885. The light is located on Tennant Point in the small fishing village of Terence Bay.

Victoria Beach

Location: Battery Point, Nova Scotia

The Victoria Beach Lighthouse is an 8 metre (26 feet) square-tapered, wooden tower topped by a superimposed gallery and a square wooden lantern. Constructed in 1901, it is the first lighthouse on the site but the fourth navigational aid erected on the Digby Gut–Annapolis Basin water corridor. It is located at Battery Point on the east side of the Digby Gut.

Wallace Harbour Sector

Location: County of Cumberland, Nova Scotia

Built in 1904, the Wallace Harbour Sector Lighthouse is an 8 metre (26 feet) square wood-frame tower painted white with a broad horizontal red band across its front as a daymark. It is situated on the side of a main highway near the shoreline of Wallace Harbour. It was originally one part of a pair of range lights, but was converted to an individual sector light in 1990. Route 6, the local highway, passes very close to the doorway of the lighthouse.

Heritage lighthouses in Prince Edward Island

Brighton Beach Front Range

Location: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Built in 1889, the Brighton Beach Front Range Lighthouse is a 12.2-metre (40 feet) square, tapered, wooden tower painted in the traditional red and white of the Canadian Coast Guard. It is a highly valued symbol of Charlottetown’s Brighton Ward and for the city as a whole.

Cape Bear

Location: Murray Harbour, Prince Edward Island

The Cape Bear Lighthouse is a wooden square-tapered tower. Built in 1881, the lighthouse is located on the southeastern tip of Prince Edward Island overlooking the Northumberland Strait. The Cape Bear Lighthouse is a symbol of Murray Harbour and the south shore of Prince Edward Island and a well-known landmark in the province.

Cape Tryon

Location: Park Corner, Prince Edward Island

The Cape Tryon Lighthouse is a 12.4 metre (40 feet) square, tapered, wooden lighthouse that sits atop a red sandstone cliff to the north of the Village of French River, guiding mariners and their vessels along the northern coast of Prince Edward Island between Richmond Bay and New London. Built in 1967, it is the second lighthouse on the site.

Covehead Harbour

Location: Covehead, Prince Edward Island

The Covehead Harbour Lighthouse is square, tapered, 8.2 metre (26.9 ft) tall wooden tower surmounted by a square, wooden lantern. It is located among the sand dunes of Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada, on the beach just to the east of the entrance into Covehead Bay. It is the second lighthouse on the site, built in 1975 as a replacement for the original tower.

Northport Rear Range

Location: Northport, Prince Edward Island

Built in 1885, the Northport Rear Range Lighthouse is a 13.6 metre (45 feet) square, tapered, wooden tower with a straight top surmounted by a square, wooden lantern. It is located at the south end of the harbour in the Community of Northport, overlooking Cascumpec Bay.

Panmure Head

Location: Montague, Prince Edward Island

The Panmure Head Lighthouse is a 17.7 metre (58 feet) octagonal, tapered, wooden tower surmounted by a twelve-sided, cast-iron lantern. Constructed in 1853, it was the second lighthouse built in Prince Edward Island. It is visually attractive due to its excellent proportions and decorative architectural features. The Panmure Head Lighthouse is a symbol of the local community, being a major tourist attraction and icon for over 50 years.

Point Prim

Location: Point Prim, Community of Belfast, Prince Edward Island

The Point Prim Lighthouse is located at the end of Point Prim on a point of land extending into the Northumberland Strait. It marks the southeastern entrance to Hillsborough Bay and Charlottetown Harbour. The lighthouse is a tapered, cylindrical, brick tower covered in wood shingles, and measures 18.3 metres (60 feet) from base to vane.

Heritage lighthouses in Newfoundland and Labrador

Belle Isle South End Lower

Location: St. Anthony, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Belle Isle South End Lower Lighthouse, built in 1908, is a rare example of a Canadian lighthouse which has a lantern, but no tower. The lighthouse consists of a massive concrete base with an exterior masonry wall, to which is affixed a red metal lantern topped with a dome. At 5.7 metres in height, it is one of the smallest lighthouses in Canada.

Cape Anguille

Location: Codroy, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Cape Anguille Lighthouse is a tapered, octagonal, reinforced-concrete lighthouse, measuring 17.7 metres (58 feet). The lighthouse serves as a popular tourist destination; visitors stay at the bed and breakfast in the old lightkeeper’s residence, a provincial Registered Heritage Property.

Cape Race, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: Cape Race, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Cape Race Lighthouse is a reinforced concrete cylindrical shaft, topped by a circular lantern with a dome roof. Built in 1907, and standing 29 metres (95 ft) tall, this landfall light was the first lighthouse in Canada to be built with reinforced concrete and its lantern houses a very rare hyper-radial Fresnel lens.

Cape Ray

Location: Cape Ray, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Cape Ray Lighthouse consists of a reinforced-concrete, tapered, octagonal tower surmounted by an aluminum and glass lantern. Situated near a small fishing village by the same name, in an isolated area on the southwest coast of Newfoundland, the lighthouse guides international and coastal shipping vessels navigating the Cabot Strait, where the Atlantic Ocean intersects with the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Cape Spear, National Historic Site of Canada

Location: St John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Built in 1835, the Cape Spear Lighthouse combines a lighthouse and keepers’ dwelling, a popular 19th century design. The lighthouse stands on a rocky peninsula that forms the easternmost point of North America. Its construction is associated with the achievement of representative government in Newfoundland in 1832. It was the new government’s first major public works project. The Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site of Canada is managed by Parks Canada and welcomes visitors from mid-May to mid-October.

Cape St. Mary’s

Location: Cape St. Mary’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Cape St. Mary’s Lighthouse is a tapered, octagonal tower that measures 10 metres (33 feet). Originally built as a brick tower in 1859-60, it was first covered with concrete and encased in a cylinder of cast-iron sheets in 1885, and then covered in poured concrete in the mid-1950s, giving it its current form. The lighthouse is located atop stunning 100-metre cliffs at Cape St. Mary’s, at the southwestern tip of the Avalon Peninsula.

Fort Amherst

Location: St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Fort Amherst Lighthouse is a square, tapered, wooden tower overlooking the Narrows, the channel leading to St. John’s Harbour in Newfoundland and Labrador. It is located where Fort Amherst, a British military tower and battery, once stood. Built in 1951, it is the third lighthouse on the site.

Green Island

Location: Catalina, Newfoundland and Labrador

Green Island Lighthouse is a 10.4 metre (34 feet) tall octagonal, tapered, reinforced concrete-clad stone lighthouse. The lighthouse is also known as Catalina Lighthouse. It stands off the east coast of Newfoundland, on a wave-swept island on the southern approach to Catalina Harbour in Trinity Bay. It is the oldest lighthouse erected after Newfoundland received full colonial status that is still standing. Nearly 150 years old, the lighthouse is a major landmark for local mariners, passing commercial vessels and hikers taking in views from the mainland.

Long Point (Twillingate)

Location: Twillingate, Newfoundland and Labrador

The Long Point (Twillingate) Lighthouse is a brick lighthouse built in 1876, which was later encased in reinforced-concrete in 1929. Situated 100 metres (331 feet) above sea level, atop a cliff in Notre Dame Bay on the northeastern coast of Newfoundland, the lighthouse guides vessels into Twillingate Harbour and is a popular eco-tourism destination.

New Férolle Peninsula

Location: New Férolle, Newfoundland and Labrador

The New Férolle Peninsula Lighthouse is a tapered, hexagonal, reinforced-concrete lighthouse that measures 19.2 metres (63 feet) in height. Since its construction in 1913, the tower has guided transatlantic shipping entering the Gulf of St. Lawrence through the Strait of Belle Isle.

Point Amour

Location: L’Anse Amour, Newfoundland and Labrador

Built in 1857, the Point Amour Lighthouse is located on the southeast side of Forteau Bay in the Strait of Belle Isle. At 33.2 metres (109 feet), it is the tallest lighthouse in Newfoundland and Labrador and the second tallest in Canada. The lighthouse has a tapered limestone and brick shaft, capped by a stepped and flared cornice, upon which rests the gallery and the lantern. A two-storey, gable-roofed duplex dwelling, also constructed of limestone, is attached to the lighthouse by its rear wing.