Heritage Lighthouses of Canada

Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site of Canada
© Parks Canada

Designated Lighthouses

The Minister responsible for Parks Canada designates heritage lighthouses on behalf of the Government of Canada.

The Minister responsible for Parks Canada will consider all lighthouses for which a valid petition was received and determine which should be designated as heritage lighthouses on or before 29 May 2015, taking into account the advice of an advisory committee and the established criteria.

To learn more about processes related to the evaluation and designation of petitioned lighthouses, please visit our Evaluation & Designation page.

To learn which lighthouses were petitioned to be considered for heritage designation under the Act, you can access province-by-province listings that are available from our Petitioned Lighthouses page.

Discover heritage lighthouses!

* To date, there have been no heritage lighthouse designations in the indicated province.

Heritage lighthouses in British Columbia

East Point (Saturna Island)
A 14-metre (46 ft) steel skeleton lighthouse tower with six integrated platforms and connecting flights of stairs; the lighting apparatus rests on the uppermost square platform surrounded by a railed gallery. Established 125 years ago, the East Point lightstation on Saturna Island was the first to mark the intricate channel between the Juan de Fuca and Georgia straits. The East Point heritage lighthouse designation includes the former fog alarm building which has been adapted for use as an interpretive centre on Saturna Island's rich history.
Location: Saturna Island, British Columbia
Statement of Significance (LH-091): English (PDF, 103 Kb) | French (PDF, 145 Kb)
Designated in May 2013.

Fisgard
A 17.1-metre (56 ft) tapered cylindrical tower surmounted by a multi-faceted lantern and attached to a two-storey keeper's dwelling. Constructed in 1859-1860 to mark the entrance to Esquimalt Harbour, it is the first and oldest lighthouse on Canada's Pacific Coast. Intimately associated with the early period of development of Vancouver Island and British Columbia as a whole, it also served as an important symbol of sovereignty - British, then colonial and finally Canadian. The designation includes a replica boathouse built in 1978 and a replica storehouse built in the 1960s.
Location: Colwood, British Columbia
Statement of Significance (LH-168): English (PDF, 124 Kb) | French (PDF, 110 Kb)
Designated in May 2013.

Active Pass
The Active Pass lighthouse is a 13.7 metres (45 feet) tall cylindrical concrete structure topped by an octagonal metal lantern. It is one of the “apple core” lighthouses, a popular design on the West Coast at the end of the 1960s and early 1970s. It is located on the north eastern extremity of Mayne Island in the Georgia Strait. Built in 1969 as the third coastal light on the site, it marks the eastern entrance to Active Pass.
Location: Mayne Island, British Columbia
Statement of Significance (LH-066): English (PDF, 115 Kb) | French (PDF, 156 Kb)
Designated in December 2013.

Estevan Point
The Estevan Point Lighthouse is a 30.5 metres (100 ft) tall white octagonal tower of reinforced concrete comprised of a central column surrounded by eight immense flying buttresses and surmounted by a gallery topped by a red circular metal lantern. It is located at the southern extremity of the Hesquiat Peninsula on Vancouver Island’s rugged and remote western coast.
Location: Estevan Point, Vancouver Island, British Columbia
Statement of Significance (LH-076): English (PDF, 148 Kb) | French (PDF, 116 Kb)
Designated in December 2013.

Nootka
The Nootka lighthouse is a square, galvanized-steel tower surrounded by a steel skeleton tower originally designed to support the lantern gallery and a wooden daymark. Built on San Rafael Island as a replacement lighthouse in 1958, the Nootka heritage lighthouse is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island at the entrance to Nootka Sound, overlooking Friendly Cove.
Location: Yuquot, Vancouver Island, British Columbia
Statement of Significance (LH-065): English (PDF, 68 Kb) | French (PDF, 68 Kb)
Designated in February 2014.

Heritage lighthouses in Ontario

McNab Point
A 8.5 metre (28 ft) square wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by an iron lantern and a cylindrical ventilator; unlike many similar towers it has no gallery. Constructed in 1877 as part of a major harbour improvement project, it was relocated from the northern tip of Horseshoe Bay to its present location on McNab Point in 1901.
Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON
Statement of Significance (LH-009): English (PDF, 95 Kb) | French (PDF, 100 Kb)
Designated in August 2012.

Saugeen River Front Range
A 9.5 metre (31 ft) square wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by a metal railed gallery and a wooden lantern. Located on Lake Huron on the end of a pier extending westward from the north side of the mouth of the Saugeen River in the community of Southampton, it and the nearly identical rear range light located 750 metres to the east were constructed in 1903.
Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON
Statement of Significance (LH-007): English (PDF, 100 Kb) | French (PDF, 100 Kb)
Designated in August 2012.

Saugeen River Rear Range
A 9.5 metre (31 ft) square wooden structure with tapered walls, surmounted by a metal railed gallery and a wooden lantern. Located on a rise of land on the north side of the Saugeen River in the community of Southampton, it and the nearly identical front range light located 750 metres to the west were constructed in 1903. Originally located 215 metres to the east of the front light, it was moved to its current location in 1906.
Location: Town of Saugeen Shores, Southampton ON
Statement of Significance (LH-008): English (PDF, 100 Kb) | French (PDF, 100 Kb)
Designated in August 2012.

Windmill Point 
The Windmill Point Lighthouse (also known as Battle of the Windmill Lighthouse and Windmill Tower) is an18.9 metres (62 feet) round, tapered, stone tower crowned with a cast iron lantern. It is located on a height of land near the town of Prescott, where it overlooks the old King’s Highway and the St. Lawrence River. Initially built as a windmill in ca. 1832, it was the site of the Battle of the Windmill during the Rebellion of 1837-38. In 1872, it was converted to a lighthouse and became operational by 1874, remaining in service for over a century.
Location: Prescott, ON
Statement of Significance (LH-213): English (PDF, 115 Kb) | French (PDF, 123 Kb)
Designated in December 2013.

Heritage lighthouses in Nova Scotia

St. Paul Island Southwest
A prefabricated, cast-iron, cylindrical tower surmounted by a 12-sided iron lantern. It was built to warn vessels away from the dangerous St. Paul Island in the Cabot Strait with a flashing light that was visible to a distance of 18 nautical miles. It illustrates the importance and ingenuity of the Dominion Lighthouse Depot and the Canadian Coast Guard in providing a marine aids to navigation program in Canadian waters.
Location: Dingwall, Cape Breton NS
Statement of Significance (LH-043): English (PDF, 95 Kb) | French (PDF, 105 Kb)
Designated in August 2012.

Heritage lighthouses in Prince Edward Island

Brighton Beach Front Range
The Brighton Beach Front Range heritage lighthouse is a 12.2-metre (40 ft) square, tapered, wooden tower painted in the traditional red and white of the Canadian Coast Guard. It is a highly valued symbol of Charlottetown’s Brighton Ward and for the city as a whole. Built in 1889 at the confluence of the North (Yorke) River with Charlottetown Harbour, the lighthouse supported the maritime economy of Charlottetown through the late nineteenth century and throughout the twentieth. Together with its companion Brighton Beach Rear Range light, it is a very good example of the system of marine aids to navigation developed for Prince Edward Island.
Location: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 
Statement of Significance (LH-335): English (PDF, 110 Kb) | French (PDF, 110 Kb)
Designated in May 2013.

Heritage lighthouses in Newfoundland and Labrador

Point Amour 
Built in 1857, the Point Amour Lighthouse is located on the southeast side of Forteau Bay
in the Strait of Belle Isle. At 33.2 metres (109 feet), it is the tallest lighthouse in Newfoundland and Labrador and the second tallest in Canada. The lighthouse has a tapered limestone and brick shaft, capped by a stepped and flared cornice, upon which rests the gallery and the lantern. A two-storey, gable-roofed duplex dwelling, also constructed of limestone, is attached to the lighthouse by its rear wing. It is an excellent example of a major coastal lighthouse, serving the communities in the region from L’Anse au Clair to Red Bay.
Location: L’Anse Amour, Newfoundland and Labrador
Statement of Significance (LH-151): English (PDF, 116 Kb) | French (PDF, 119 Kb)
Designated in December 2013.

Cape Ray
The Cape Ray lighthouse consists of a freestanding, reinforced-concrete, tapered octagonal tower surmounted by an aluminum and glass lantern. Situated near a small fishing village by the same name, in an isolated area on the southwest coast of Newfoundland, the lighthouse guides international and coastal shipping vessels navigating the Cabot Strait, where the Atlantic Ocean intersects with the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
Location: Cape Ray, Newfoundland and Labrador
Statement of Significance (LH-346): English (PDF, 68 Kb) | French (PDF, 275 Kb)
Designated in February 2014.

Fort Amherst
The Fort Amherst lighthouse is a square, tapered, wooden tower overlooking the Narrows, the channel leading to St. John’s Harbour in Newfoundland and Labrador. It is located where Fort Amherst, a British military tower and battery, once stood. Built in 1951, it is the third lighthouse on the site.
Location: St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
Statement of Significance (LH-332): English (PDF, 74 Kb) | French (PDF, 160 Kb)
Designated in February 2014.

Long Point (Twillingate)
The Long Point (Twillingate) lighthouse is a brick lighthouse built in 1876, which was later encased in reinforced-concrete in 1929. Situated 331 feet above sea level, atop a cliff in Notre Dame Bay on the northeastern coast of Newfoundland, the lighthouse guides vessels into Twillingate Harbour and is a popular eco-tourism destination.
Location: Twillingate, Newfoundland and Labrador
Statement of Significance (LH-285): English (PDF, 68 Kb) | French (PDF, 233 Kb)
Designated in February 2014.