Our Story

Maintaining Balance

 Park scientist at work monitoring the response of the boreal forest to the spruce bark beetle outbreak
Park scientist at work monitoring the response of the boreal forest to the spruce bark beetle outbreak.
Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon.
© Parks Canada

By the 1960s, burgeoning tourism, combined with an awareness of the environmental impact that development sometimes caused, made some visitors long for more secluded campsites and less intrusive infrastructure. Backcountry experiences became more popular and new ways to appreciate national parks were created. Nature trails and interpretive programs were introduced, while restrictions were placed on the expansion of town sites, golf courses, and other resort-based tourist amenities.

As we came to understand more fully the impact of intensifying human development on nature, Parks Canada responded by fine-tuning its vision and approach to preserving and improving the state of national parks. It culminated around the turn of the century in the adoption of a renewed ecosystem approach to managing the lands and waters within our boundaries. The scientific expertise of ecologists, biologists and fire management specialists continues to lead the way in protecting and restoring natural systems.

 

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