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Archaeology

Archaeology and the Environment

Canadian Environmental Assessment and Parks Canada

Skincuttle Inlet at Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve of Canada (B.C.) Skincuttle Inlet at Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve of Canada (B.C.)
© Parks Canada / Andrews, D. / 10.105.07.19(26) / 1996

Some development projects may damage the environment. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act as well as some provincial legislation and various municipal, regional and corporate policies require the proponents of the project to carry out impact studies to measure the anticipated effects of their projects. Archaeological resources are among the environmental factors that may be affected by such projects. Consequently, the fundamental question for the developer is:

Did you take archaeological resources into account when you assessed the environmental impact of your project?

If a project involves changing the landscape, levelling, grubbing (root and stump removal), dredging the seabed, tree clearing, excavating, filling, construction, demolition or the movement of vehicles and people in the area, there may be an impact on archaeological resources.

For projects governed by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, Parks Canada can assist federal proponents in the assessment process.

The following must be determined:

  • Whether there are archaeological resources in the project area

  • What regulatory measures may apply

  • How to find a professional archaeologist

  • What conditions to include in the service contract

  • How to manage archaeological objects, specimens and documents

For information, please contact:

Thomas Hammer, Manager
Terrestrial archaeology
Cultural Sciences Branch
Parks Canada Agency
30, Victoria Street
Gatineau, QC
J8X 0B3