Grasslands National Park of Canada

Birding

Grasslands National Park is a haven for prairie bird enthusiasts. Both common and rare birds may be found here. Rock Wrens in the badlands, Golden Eagles in the buttes, Spotted Towhees in the riparian shrubs and Burrowing Owls on the prairie dog towns.

The burrowing owl (endangered) has suffered significant declines across its North American range. The burrowing owl (endangered) has suffered significant declines across its North American range.
© Robert Koktan

Spring:
Horned Larks are one of the first migrant birds to return to Saskatchewan in February or early March. The year round residents, Greater Sage Grouse (endangered) and the Sharp-Tailed Grouse (common) are best seen at this time of year. This is a time when boreal migrants are passing through.

Summer:
Summer is an excellent time to listen to the melody of the grasslands songbirds, such as Longspurs and the Sprague’s Pipit. The Long- Billed Curlew (special concern) is the largest shorebird of the Great Plains and commonly seen in the West Block.

Fall:
Migrating visitors are passing through at this time of year. It is common to spot plovers, kinglets and thrushes. Birders may be overwhelmed by the diversity of sparrows. Rough-legged Hawks and Prairie Falcons can be spotted early in the fall before they head south.

Winter:
Winter residents in the park include the Gold Eagle, Snow Bunting, Longspurs, and the Northern Shrike. Finches and waxwings can also be spotted in the winter. Please talk to park staff about winter road access before birding in the park.

 

***Please note that according to the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the exact location of species listed as “At Risk” cannot be disclosed. Please report any sightings of species at risk to the Visitor Reception Centre.