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Forillon National Park

Park management

Mandate

As with the other Canadian national parks, Forillon National Park strives to protect and present the natural and cultural heritage of its territory; and allow the public to learn about, appreciate, and enjoy this heritage in a manner ensuring its ecological and commemorative integrity for the benefit of current and future generations.

Protection of resources
Forillon National Park preserves highly valuable natural and cultural resources.  In keeping with the objective of ensuring the integrity of ecological processes and cultural values, a range of research, restoration and monitoring programs have all come to constitute a cornerstone of park management. Indeed, the protection of resources is a vital component of today and tomorrow’s visitor experience.

Visitor experience
Visitors to the park should be able to enjoy an experience that awakens their senses, stirs their emotions, stimulates their minds and creates a bond with this very special place. Thanks to the sound management of the park’s human, material (i.e., infrastructure) et financial resources, as well as its programs, Forillon offers visitors opportunities to enjoy – in complete safety – quality experiences related to the protection of natural and cultural values. Protected areas such as Forillon National Park afford a wealth of memorable experiences and, for this reason, will preserve their relevance and enjoy strong support for their long-term maintenance. 

Education
By fostering a special act with heritage areas, educational programs undeniably contribute to a rewarding visit experience. Educational programs help improve understanding of the value of a protected area and the serious challenges associated with maintaining its integrity.
 
Laws and regulations
Forillon National Park’s mandate is based on several pieces of legislation, such as :

  • the Canada National Parks Act (2000), which stipulates that “The National Parks of Canada are hereby dedicated to the people of Canada for their benefit, education and enjoyment” and “the parks shall be maintained and made use of so as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations” (sec. 4);
  • the Historic Sites and Monuments Act (1953), which sets out the process for designating national historic sites;
  • the Species at Risk Act (2002), whose implementation is the responsibility of Parks Canada as well as Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment Canada;
  • other federal laws and regulations, particularly those pertaining to the marine portion of Forillon National Park,
  • and the applicable provisions of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.
     

Management plan

Forillon National Park Management Plan, 2010 (PDF, 4.5 MB)

If you need to view this document in another format or would like a paper copy, please send us an email at: information@pc.gc.ca

 

Coastal ecosystems restoration

Healthy Shorelines Key to Successfully Adapting to Erosion

If Forillon’s coastal landscapes are so beautiful, it’s thanks in large part to the way sea erosion has sculpted them over thousands of years.

Today, however, this entirely natural phenomenon has been accentuated by climate change and amplified by infrastructures that are not adapted to beach dynamics.

In order to protect coastal ecosystems and the activities that are conducted in them, a major program to restore the natural dynamic of coastal areas is currently being implemented.

Penouille sand bar 

Cap-des-Rosiers beach  

  • Adaptation solutions to coastal erosion  (information coming soon)
  • Natural and historical characteristics (information coming soon)

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