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Point Pelee National Park of Canada

Spring Migration

Monthly Summaries of Spring Migrants

April

Again, like March, the amount of migration in April is dependent on the weather. Usually once or twice during the month, however, a warm spell will occur, and it is then that there will be a wave of migrants including the first insectivorous species. During April, many of Pelee's winter visitors such as the common merganser, rough-legged hawk, short-eared owl (rare), hairy woodpecker, common redpoll and American tree sparrow will be seen for the last time.

Early

Greater Yellowlegs
Pectoral Sandpiper
American Bittern
Lesser Yellowlegs
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Turkey Vulture
Black-crowned Night Heron
Savannah Sparrow
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Vesper Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Eastern Towhee
Common Snipe
Great Egret
White-throated Sparrow
Common Loon

Mid

Double-crested Cormorant
Purple Martin
Brown Thrasher
Osprey
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Pine Warbler
American Golden Plover*
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Forster's Tern
Common Tern
Caspian Tern
Swamp Sparrow
Bank Swallow
Rough-winged Swallow
Chipping Swallow
Louisiana Waterthrush (rare)

With an exceptional warm front in the last few days of April a surge of typical May migrants may appear. If, however, the weather is more-or-less normal, only the following are likely to be new arrivals in the last ten days of the month.

Late

Green Heron
Marsh Wren
Broad-winged Hawk
Gray Catbird Virginia Rail
Wood Thrush
White-eyed Vireo
Sora
Common Moorhen
Solitary Vireo
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Nashville Warbler
Dunlin
Yellow Warbler
Whip-poor-will
Chimney Swift
Palm Warbler
Red-headed Woodpecker
Cliff Swallow
Northern Waterthrush
Red-breasted Nuthatch*
Purple Finch*
House Wren
Grasshopper Sparrow
Henslow's Sparrow (rare)
Black-and-white Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler

* irregular

In mid-April, horned grebe, gadwall, green-winged and blue-winged teal, American wigeon, northern shoveler, lesser scaup, American coot, tree Swallow and both kinglet species are likely to be encountered in exceptional numbers.