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Thousand Islands National Park of Canada

More than 200 landowners participate in study

Vegetation data will be used to create a community atlas for land planning decisions

Parks Canada's Ecological Land Classification technicians Mary Beth Lynch (left) and Oliver Reichl used GPS (Global Positioning System) and plant identification skills to locate and classify vegetation plots across the 1000 Islands ecosystem over the past two years.  The data collected will be used to create a map of the landscape that can be used by governments and private citizens for land use planning.
Parks Canada’s Ecological Land Classification technicians Mary Beth Lynch (left) and Oliver Reichl used GPS (Global Positioning System) and plant identification skills to locate and classify vegetation plots across the 1000 Islands ecosystem over the past two years. The data collected will be used to create a map of the landscape that can be used by governments and private citizens for land use planning.
© Parks Canada

The Thousand Islands National Park Ecological Land Classification (ELC) crew has been working with approximately 200 private landowners this summer season to gather information about soil, vegetation, topography, and forest types in Eastern Ontario.

In partnership with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, the data will be used to identify different vegetation communities throughout the 1000 Islands ecosystem. The data also feeds into a Community Atlas that will be produced by the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve to help local groups and regional residents make sound land use planning decisions.

The ELC team would like to thank all of the enthusiastic landowners who participated in the program this summer.

"Working with landowners was rewarding to both parties,” said ELC crew member Janice Ball. “Landowners had the chance to share stories about the property's history and natural elements that they cherish and in turn we had a chance to share our ecological knowledge."

This season’s fieldwork marks the end of the second year of the Ecological Land Classification Project. The final year of the project will be spent analyzing data and creating fine-scale vegetation maps of the region.

For more information about the Ecological Land Classification Project, call 613-923-5261