Thousand Islands National Park of Canada

Immerse yourself in the Islands
Explore the dynamic channels of the Thousand Islands with your crew and find something to fascinate you around every bend; sunken ships, historic castles, and a landscape steeped in First Nations history.
© 1000 Islands Kayaking Company

Immerse yourself in the Islands

Escape the crowd, forget the tour boat and witness Thousand Islands National Park as few do, from the intimate perspective of a kayak. Explore the dynamic channels of the Thousand Islands with your crew and find something to fascinate you around every bend; sunken ships, historic castles, and a landscape steeped in First Nations history. Lucky paddlers may glimpse a soaring bald eagle or a family of turtles basking on a rock. Chance upon a roving park interpreter and discover elements of the park’s nature and culture up close. Tired but inspired, share the day’s stories around a crackling fire.

Plan Your Trip

Groups of islands have ideal conditions for paddling: protection from wind and lower speed limits for other boats. As well, if you choose campsites that are available on a first-come, first-served basis, paddling in groups of islands provides easy access alternative sites if one island is full.

Admiralty Islands: Mermaid, Aubrey, McDonald, Beau Rivage, Thwartway
Closest access point is the Gananoque Municipal Marina, site of 1000 Islands Kayaking Company

Lake Fleet Islands: Camelot, Endymion
Closest access points are the Gananoque Municipal Marina, site of 1000 Islands Kayaking Company and Misty Isles Lodge.

Navy Islands: Gordon, Mulcaster
Closest access points is Misty Isles Lodge.

Grenadier Island
While not a cluster of islands, has four park sites with camping at three: North, South, and East Grenadier.

Closest access point is Mallorytown Landing, the mainland base of Thousand Islands National Park.

Thousand Islands Bridge, Georgina Island, Constance Island, and Hill Island
Paddling around the Thousand Islands Bridge, Georgina Island, Constance Island, and Hill Island is recommended for advanced paddlers only. The river bottlenecks here generating stronger and unpredictable currents as well as increased boat traffic.

Closest access point is a boat launch in Ivy Lea.

Camping Reservations

Thousand Islands National Park offers Parks Canada oTENTik camping accommodations on McDonald and Gordon Islands, and on the mainland at Mallorytown Landing. A number of park campsites are available for reservation. All other campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

More tips

  • If you’re looking for a more tranquil experience, consider that July and August are the most popular months for visitors to Thousand Islands National Park. June and September are quieter with less boat traffic.
  • Check out our facilities and services page to pick the island that best suits your needs. Browse the availability of garbage and recycling collection, campsites, picnic shelters, wood stoves, and barbeques on different islands.
  • Docks, beaching sites, composting toilets and picnic tables are available on all serviced islands.
  • Drinking water, ice, and bathrooms with electricity and flush toilets are available on Central Grenadier Island.
  • Be sure to use a navigational chart when boating in the area.
  • Knowledgeable island attendants circulate throughout the islands to serve you and maintain facilities, sell firewood and ice, assist with fee payment, help with concerns, and make your experience a positive one.
  • Enjoy hiking trails, entertaining nature programs at your dock or campsite by park staff, campfire pits, hidden geocaches, and great swimming on the islands.

Regional Outfitters

  • 1000 Islands Kayaking Company and Misty Isles Lodge are the main regional outfitting companies offering kayak and canoe rentals. Check out their websites for more information.
  • The Thousand Islands Water Trail provides maps for 9 full-day and half-day routes that connect for the option of a longer trip. These maps identify access points, trip times and lengths, potential hazards, and points of natural and cultural interest. They are not replacements for accurate nautical charts.

Fees

  • See our park fees page for a full list of fees.
  • Relevant fees for paddlers include beaching fees, camping fees, and firewood fees.
  • Obtain permits from park interpreters at the Mallorytown Landing Visitor Centre with cash, debit, credit or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada. Otherwise, self-register on the island at the green deposit boxes located near most docks. Fees can be paid by cash or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada. Signs on the deposit boxes outline the fee details and instructions for self registration.
  • Camping may be prepaid for oTENTik accomodations and for select campsites through the Parks Canada Reservation Service.
  • Fees remain in the park and are used to improve facilities and services.

For Your Comfort and Safety

  • Garbage and recycling service and generator use is available on limited islands. Visitors who want a more natural park experience can enjoy generator-free islands that have a pack-in, pack-out policy in place. Identify these islands on our facilities and services page.
  • Black legged ticks, potential carriers of Lyme disease and Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, are common in Eastern Ontario and Thousand Islands National Park. Please visit our Ticks and Your Health page for more information on how to protect yourself.
  • The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a highly destructive tree pest has been spreading across Eastern Ontario and Canada. The park is asking that visitors use only park-provided firewood as it is guaranteed to be EAB-free. Respecting this regulation will slow the spread of EAB and protect our forests.
  • See our Visitor Safety page for complete park rules and regulations.