Thousand Islands National Park of Canada

Relax by the River at Mallorytown Landing
Relax by the River at Mallorytown Landing
© Parks Canada

Relax by the River at Mallorytown Landing

Thousand Islands National Park welcomes you to relax and play on the breezy banks of the St. Lawrence River. From community picnics to family reunions to an impromptu outing, Mallorytown Landing has all the ingredients for family fun: new barbeque facilities and a beautiful gazebo, interactive indoor and outdoor exhibits, live animals that kids of all ages can touch and hold, nature programs, and a playground. Park interpreters are available to share stories of the park and, chances are, you’ll be busy making memories and stories of your own!

Located conveniently between Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa, the Mallorytown Landing Day Use Area is a perfect meeting point for families, community groups, and casual receptions. To reserve the gazebo or picnic shelter free of charge, please contact the park.

Plan Your Trip

  • Every summer family and friends gather at Mallorytown Landing to celebrate Aboriginal Day, Parks Day, Canada Day and the Thousand Islands Fine Arts Association Art Show. Check out the Calendar of Events page for more information.
  • Barbecues are available for picnickers and communal picnic tables can accommodate large groups. Contact the park to reserve the picnic shelter or gazebo free of charge.
  • Thousand Islands National Park offers Parks Canada oTENTik camping accommodations on McDonald and Gordon Islands, as well as on the mainland at Mallorytown Landing.
  • Children ages 6 to 11 can become Official Parks Canada Xplorers by participating in fun activities at the visitor centre. Learn more on our Parks Canada Xplorers page.
  • Geocaching is a worldwide activity where participants hunt for hidden treasures with GPS units. The Get Me Geocaching program teaches visitors how to use a GPS to find geocaches. GPS units are available for loan and the program is free.
  • Learn about what the Thousand Islands means from a First Nations perspective in Voices of Akwesasne, a series of video vignettes playing at the visitor centre.
  • The Mohawk Thanksgiving Address has been commemorated in a rock carving at Mallorytown Landing’s scenic lookout. Each image in the carving is also carved into rocks scattered around the grounds. See if you can find them all.
  • The visitor centre is home to examples of park wildlife. Take an opportunity to see or touch frogs, turtles, fish, and snakes.
  • Our Thousand Islands-themed playground gets kids rowing like a “river rat” in a landlocked boat, swinging in a bird’s nest swing, and basking like a turtle on a climbing rock.
  • Interpretive panels on the visitor centre grounds celebrate Leaders on the Landscape – local residents who champion a conservation ethic. Join the ongoing story of visitors who help protect this beautiful area for future generations.
  • Butterfly gardens and bird boxes attract wildlife. Borrow a guide book from the visitor centre and try to identify what you see.
  • A 40-metre mural by artist Jan Swaren celebrates Mallorytown Landing visitors. Osprey sculptures made of recycled material by artist Alanna Baird soar overhead.
  • Boats and kayaks can launch, beach, and dock at Mallorytown Landing.
  • Escape the daily grind on 2-km of hiking trails with easy and moderate loops through a red pine plantation and rocky mixed forest.
  • For hours and location, check out the Visitor Information page.

Fees

  • Relevant fees include parking fees for motorists, launching and docking fees for boaters, and beaching fees for paddlers.
  • Obtain permits from park interpreters at the Mallorytown Landing Visitor Centre with cash, debit, credit or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada. Otherwise, self register at the green deposit box. Fees can be paid at the deposit box by cash or a cheque made out to the Receiver General for Canada. Signs on the deposit boxes outline the fee details and instructions for self registration.
  • Camping may be reserved for oTENTik accommodations and for select campsites through the Parks Canada Reservation Service.
  • See our park fees page for a full list of fees.
  • Fees remain in the park and are used to improve facilities and services.

For Your Comfort and Safety

  • Black legged ticks, potential carriers of Lyme disease and Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, are common in Eastern Ontario and Thousand Islands National Park. Please visit our Ticks and Your Health page for more information on how to protect yourself.
  • Even the best behaved dog can run into trouble when off leash. Keeping your dog on a leash protects both your dog and any other animal that you may encounter. Wild animals can become aggressive when confronted and other dogs may not be as friendly as yours. Additionally, other visitors may be uncomfortable with or afraid of dogs.
  • Fires are permitted in barbeques only.
  • Liquor is not permitted at the Mallorytown Landing Day Use Area.
  • See our Visitor Safety page for complete park rules and regulations.