Ukkusiksalik National Park of Canada

How to Get There

Arctic seasons and your trip

A Note about Time and Place

Ukkusiksalik National Park can be accessed from the communities
of Rankin Inlet, Repulse Bay, Chesterfield Inlet, Baker Lake, or
Coral Harbour. Local outfitters can access the park by boat in July
and August. It is a 7-hour boat trip from the closest community or a
charter flight can be arranged from Baker Lake or Rankin Inlet. Rankin Inlet is the hub for air traffic heading to Repulse Bay, Chesterfield Inlet, Baker Lake, and Coral Harbour. Scheduled flights and charters to Rankin Inlet are available from Winnipeg, or from Ottawa via Iqaluit or Edmonton via Yellowknife. Air travelers should plan for the possibility of weather delays when making their travel arrangements.

Arctic seasons and your trip

The best times to visit are in summer, in July and August. Spring trips may be possible up until break-up in May. Fall and winter access is not advisable due to heightened bear hazard, weather and darkness. Contact the Parks Canada office in Repulse Bay (867) 462-4500 for more current information.

A Note about Time and Place

For thousands of years the ancestors of Inuit traveled in this place. They knew that their survival depended on their obedience to the dictates of the land and its weather. If the wind blew and the temperature plummeted, they stopped and found shelter, and continued when the land became kinder again. Inuit travelers to this day let the weather, the seasons and the rhythms of the land set their travel schedules.

This is a harsh land. Travelers may find that their personal itineraries are in conflict with the schedule dictated by wind, cold, and storm. Wise northern travelers will learn from Inuit and adjust their travel to the natural rhythms of the land they are visiting.

These travelers will leave time in their itineraries in case they need to sit for days in a tent waiting for winds to abate. They will have extra food, and reserves of patience. They will plan an extra day or three in their trips in case storms and poor visibility prevent connecting aircraft from flying. They understand the unpredictable nature of Arctic weather, and even revel in the chance to let nature set their schedule instead of a clock.

Most of all, wise northern travelers take the unparalleled opportunity to experience the life of a small northern community. They consider the extra time they have allowed for their northern adventure to be not only a safety buffer, but an essential and exciting part of their northern experience. If you come north with an inflexible schedule, you run the risk of remembering your once-in-a-lifetime trip only for its frustrations. But come prepared to accept the Arctic on its own terms--and it will open its heart to you.