Sirmilik National Park of Canada

Weather

The polar marine climate means long cold winters and short cool summers. Although you will be treated to endless daylight from May to August, the sun is absent from the sky December and January. July is the warmest month, with an average high of 11° C. In January the average high is a chilly -30° C. Spring brings strong winds and, although the park receives very little precipitation, late summer is often cloudy. In winter, loss of daylight and the presence of sea ice can make for extremely cold weather.

Monthly Average / High Maximum Average / Low Minimum / Precipitation
January -30 C / -10 C / -35 C / -43 C / 6 mm
February -31 C / -21 C / -37 C / -44 / C 1 mm
March -24 C / -15 C / -31 C / -40 C / 5 mm
April -16 C / -6 C / -24 C / -36 C / 24 mm
May -9 C / -15 C / -17 C / -28 C / 9 mm
June 4 C / 11 C / -1 C / -7 C / 11 mm
July 11 C / 14 C / 3 C / -1 C / 10 mm
August 8 C / 14 C / 1 C / -3 C / 12 mm
September 0 C / 7 C / -5 C / -12 C / 22 mm
October -9 C / -1 C / -15 C / -26 C / 3 mm
November -18 C / -8 C / -26 C / -34 C / 26 mm
December -27 C / -19 C / -34 C / -41 C / 7 mm

Based on 1999 weather statistics from Pond Inlet.

Weather in the Arctic is notoriously changeable and around Sirmilik National Park is no exception. Abrupt weather changes can affect sea and boating conditions forcing boaters to wait out rough water, sometimes for several days. White-out conditions are possible any time of year; they reduce visibility, sense of direction, and can dramatically affect the temperature and your comfort level.

During ice break up and freeze up it is impossible to cross the ocean in either boat or snowmobile. Check the “ Arctic Seasons and your Trip” section for more information.

Be prepared for snow and cold wintry conditions which can occur at any time during the brief arctic summer.

Check current weather conditions in Nunavut at Environment Canada.