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Quttinirpaaq National Park of Canada

Climate and Weather

Quttinirpaaq is a polar desert – it is a cold region with little precipitation. Winters are very cold with some of the lowest temperatures recorded in Canada. In contrast, summers, though short, can be surprisingly warm, particularly in the Lake Hazen area. Coastal areas of the park are generally cooler and receive more precipitation than the interior. Winds throughout the park tend to be light, except on the ice caps. There are 24 hours of daylight from May to August and 24 hours darkness from November to February.

Monthly Average / High / Average Low (degrees C) / Average Wind (km/hr)

January -28.7 / -37.4 / 8.5
February -26.2 / -34.1 / 12.8
March -31.3 / -40.0 / 6.1
April -14.7 / -24.5 / 10.0
May -3.5 / -8.7 / 15.2
June 4.9 / 0.0 / 15.1
July 6.1 / 2.1 / 16.6
August 4.0 / -0.4 / 12.9
September -4.5 / -11.3 / 13.8
October -15.7 / -22.7 / 11.8
November -19.7 / -27.5 / 9.9
December -21.0 / -29.5 / 15.3
Based on weather statistics from Tanquary Fiord (1996)

Weather in the Arctic is notoriously changeable and Quttinirpaaq National Park is no exception. Abrupt weather changes can affect temperature and visibility sometimes for several days. White-out conditions are possible any time of year.

Be prepared for snow and cold wintry conditions which can occur at any time during the brief arctic summer.

For current weather conditions in Nunavut, click here.