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Riding Mountain National Park

Kilometer 49 Information Page


Paving set to begin at Km 49 on Highway #10 through Riding Mountain National Park

Paving 
Paving of the Km 49
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, October 16, 2012 – Paving of the Km 49 realignment site is set to begin on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 (weather dependent). EF Moon Construction has subcontracted Nelson River Construction to complete the paving of approximately one kilometer of Highway #10 in Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP).

In May 2012, funding was announced to assist RMNP in repairing infrastructure damaged by the flooding in 2011. As announced, a portion of these funds were used on the realignment project at Km 49 on Highway #10 through RMNP as that section of the highway has suffered considerable slumping over the years. The realignment project at Km 49 began on July 25, 2012 and after three months is nearly complete.

A large number of construction vehicles will be working in the construction zone, so motorists travelling through RMNP are to watch for and obey all posted warnings, speed limits, flag workers and pilot vehicles. Traffic may be reduced to one lane and be required to use a temporary by-pass lane.

  

Extensive survey on Highway #10 through Riding Mountain National Park

Falling Weight Deflectometer
Falling Weight Deflectometer
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, September 25, 2012 – With the realignment project at Km 49 on Highway #10 in full swing, Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP) is takin g a pro-active approach regarding possible repairs to the remaining portion of the highway in the future.

RMNP has recently contracted MDH Engineered Solutions Corp. (a wholly owned subsidiary of SNC Lavalin) and Applied Research Associates, Inc. to conduct an extensive survey of the structural capacity and uniformity of the existing pavement and underlying subgrade of approximately 54 km of Highway #10 through the park. The survey will include an intensive review of the park’s construction and maintenance records of the highway, a visual pavement condition survey, Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) testing, and coring investigation.

The coring locations with be selected to coincide with the location of the FWD testing and to target high stress areas identified during the visual condition survey and will be at approximately 500 m intervals on Highway #10. The core samples will extend through the asphalt, base/subbase layers and into the natural subgrade. The information obtained from the coring investigation will be used in conjunction with the existing pavement reports and the FWD testing to provide an overall indication of the structure characteristics of the existing pavement which will be crucial in forecasting what will need to be done in regards to future repairs to Highway #10.

FWD testing will take place from September 27 – September 29, while core sampling will be taking place October 22 – October 26. All work will be done during daylight hours. SNC Lavalin will provide all traffic and safety control throughout the highway survey to protect workers and ensure public safety is maintained. Traffic may be reduced to one lane during the coring investigation and motorists travelling through RMNP are to watch for and obey all posted warnings, speed limits, flag workers and pilot vehicles in the survey zone.

Temporary speed limit change in the southern section of the Km 49 construction zone on Highway #10

Looking south September 4 Looking south September 4
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, September 5, 2012 – Due to the limited use of the Hilton Trail Head disposal site at the present time, the speed limit in the southern section of the Km 49 construction zone will be changed from 60km/hr to 80km/hr for the foreseeable future.

The area between the Hilton Trail Head and the Agassiz Tower parking lot will be an 80km/hr enforced speed zone until use of the Hilton Trail Head disposal area is required again. The construction zone from the Agassiz Tower parking lot to the northern construction border at Crawford Creek Trail Head will remain 60km/hr and flag personnel will continue to direct traffic in that section of the construction zone.

Once the Hilton Trail Head disposal site is required again the public will be notified of any changes to the speed limit in the affected area. Motorists travelling through RMNP are to watch for and obey all posted warnings, speed limits, flag workers and pilot vehicles in the construction zone.

Portage La Prairie’s EF Moon awarded the construction contract at Km 49

Looking down the centre line Looking down the centre line
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, July 31, 2012 – July 25, 2012, was day one of a three month project at Km 49 for the construction company EF Moon as their subcontractor began removing trees at the site of a new 800 metre stretch of highway through Riding Mountain National Park. After some initial delays the tree removal should be completed before the end of the week and a small EF Moon crew has begun work at the areas already cleared with the full crew to arrive at the site once the tree removal is complete.

“I am very pleased that the construction has begun,” said Robert Sopuck, Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan River-Marquette. “This important measure will enhance the safety of the driving public and visitors to Riding Mountain National Park.”

EF Moon, a second generation, family run construction company from Portage La Prairie, Manitoba was the successful bidder on a project involving the realignment of Km 49 on Highway #10 through RMNP. Founded in 1962 they are celebrating 50 years in the industry. The company’s headquarters are in Portage La Prairie however they have completed a number of projects throughout southern Manitoba including the Brandon Dyke Project, Whiteshell Laboratories – (AECL) Pinawa, and the Transcona Walking Path in Winnipeg to name a few. Their mission statement is simple, “To create a positive work environment for all employees and to provide high quality, professional heavy construction services safely and efficiently to all our customers; no matter how big or small.” They plan to bring this ethic with them as they embark on the project at Km 49.

Once the tree removal is complete and construction begins the full crew of 15 – 20 workers will be working from 7:00am – 7:00pm daily provided the weather cooperates. “Most of the workers will be our own staff and we will also be trying to fill some spots with area residents. Our Sub-Contractors on site will be Kulish Logging (Dauphin) for the clearing of trees, Nelson River Const. (Winnipeg) for the milling and recycling of the existing asphalt and placing of the new asphalt and Alternative Landscaping (Brandon and Onanole) will be doing our erosion control,” explains Todd Turner, EF Moon General Manager. The staff from EF Moon will be staying in Dauphin for the duration of the project which will be a welcome boost to the local economy of the city of just over 8,000 residents.

EF Moon has already begun to mobilize its’ fleet to the construction site holding area. “In all there will be around 15 pieces of equipment on the site but that number will most likely change from day to day as the scope of work changes,” according to Turner. After some initial delays the workers at Moon are excited to see the tree removal begin and are ready to get to work.

The construction zone extends 12km south on Highway #10 from the north park boundary to Hilton Trail Head. With construction expected to last until early October, motorists are to watch for and obey all posted warnings, speed limits, flag workers and pilot vehicles. Traffic in this area will also be affected in both directions and travelers should be prepared to expect delays.

Construction set to begin at Km 49 on Highway #10

View north from construction start point September 4 (Construction commence) View north from construction start point September 4 (Construction commence)
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP), Manitoba, July 3, 2012 – In May 2012, funding was announced to assist Riding Mountain National Park in repairing infrastructure damaged by the flooding in 2011. As announced, a portion of these funds will be used on the realignment project at Km 49 on Highway #10 through Riding Mountain National Park. Construction is set to begin shortly.

The construction company EF Moon from Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, plans to mobilize part of the construction fleet this week in order to be ready for next week’s construction start date. Once work commences, the construction zone will extend 12 kilometres south on Highway #10 from the north park boundary to Hilton Trail Head. Every precaution will be taken to ensure traveller safety and limit inconvenience, however visitors travelling on Highway #10 should expect some travel delays in the area of construction.

Over the course of the past month, the construction area has seen lots of behind the scenes activity. In accordance with the Parks mandate to “protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage”, a number of surveys were completed to identify any species at risk or artifacts of historical or cultural significance in the construction area. During May and June, site visits and surveys were conducted by both archaeologists and biologists. The biological survey findings resulted in ruling out the use of one area for placing construction material as it was found to have golden wing warblers, a species at risk. An additional nest sweep of the remainder of the construction zone will be completed before construction begins next week. In addition, throughout the construction process steps will be taken to minimize impacts to the environment, and the site will be closely monitored by park staff to ensure these steps are being followed.

The realignment of Km 49 is the first step in Parks Canada’s commitment in mitigating the condition of Highway #10. Riding Mountain National Park recognizes the importance of highway as a major thoroughfare and a vital link to many communities surrounding the park and plans to explore options for future projects aiming at improving the remaining sections of the highway. The original construction of the highway has seen a number of modifications over the years. The most recent major modifications occurred in the late 70s and early 80s with the intention of creating a scenic parkway for visitors to enjoy, however the highway was not designed to accommodate heavy truck traffic. In addition, both the size and the number of vehicles on the highway have increased dramatically with the closure of the railroad and the centralization of various suppliers and manufacturers, only adding to the deterioration of the highway.

With a number of trailheads, popular destinations like Cairns Cabin, and beautiful campgrounds such as Moon Lake spurring off Highway #10, it has been an integral component of visitor experience in Riding Mountain National Park for decades. Park staff are striving to find ways to upgrade this crucial artery running through the heart of the park, and while this work proceeds, they continue to maintain this important highway.

Parks Canada works to ensure that Canada’s historic and natural heritage is presented and protected for the enjoyment, education and appreciation of all Canadians, today and in the future.

Government of Canada Funding Addresses 2011 Flood Damage at Riding Mountain National Park

Special Funding Supports Repairs to Infrastructure and Roadways

Slumping at Km 49 Slumping at Km 49
© Parks Canada

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, May 22, 2012 – On behalf of the Honourable Peter Kent, Canada’s Environment Minister and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Mr. Robert Sopuck, Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan River – Marquette, today announced special funding to help repair some of the damage done by the devastating flood in 2011 in Riding Mountain National Park.

“Even at its elevation, Riding Mountain National Park was not immune to flooding in 2011 and experienced the worst flooding it has seen in over 35 years,” said Mr. Sopuck. “Thanks to this funding, we will be able to restore some of the infrastructure damaged and improve safety and enhance the visitor experience.”

The Government of Canada has committed a total of $5.7 million in flood funding to assist in repairing damaged infrastructure throughout the park. Approximately $1.4 million was designated for the 2011/2012 operating year and has been spent addressing roadway, trail and culvert damage due to the flood. An additional $4.3 million has been provided in 2012/2013 for a number of projects throughout the Park. Included in this work will be the realignment of km 49 on Highway #10 running through the park.

This section of highway experienced severe erosion and cracking, which caused a 200 metre section of pavement to drop by almost 350 millimetres (13.5 inches). With the geotechnical investigations complete, the engineering and design are currently underway and construction is expected to begin this summer.

“Continued improvement of national park infrastructure is vital for both the safety and enjoyment of our visitors,” said Minister Kent. “Riding Mountain National Park is a sterling example of this Government’s continued commitment to provide visitors an opportunity to explore and discover the cultural, historical, and ecological diversity of this incredible national park.”

Parks Canada works to ensure that Canada’s historic and natural heritage is presented and protected for the enjoyment, education and appreciation of all Canadians, today and in the future. Through a network of 43 national parks, 167 national historic sites, and four national marine conservation areas, Parks Canada invites Canadians, and people from around the world, to experience Canada’s treasured natural and historic places.


 

For additional information, please see the accompanying backgrounder at www.parkscanada.gc.ca under Media Room.