Species at Risk

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Sites of Canada and Garry Oak Ecosystems

What is Parks Canada doing to save the Garry oak ecosystems?

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Sites of Canada and Gulf Islands National Park Reserves of Canada protect a significant portion of Garry oak ecosystems. To help preserve thee Garry oak ecosystems, Parks Canada is involved in recovery actions, research and monitoring and public education.

Recovery Actions

Parks Canada is an active member of the Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team (GOERT), who coordinates the efforts of government and non-government organizations and concerned individuals.

Areas invaded by introduced species have been cleaned, meaning the exotic species were removed, at both Fort Rodd Hill and in the southern Gulf Islands . A few removal sites are monitored to assess the effectiveness of the recovery.

A part of a Garry oak ecosystem before exotic plants were removed
A part of a Garry oak ecosystem before exotic plants were removed
© Parks Canada / Conan Webb / 2003
A part of a Garry oak ecosystem after exotic plants were removed
A part of a Garry oak ecosystem after exotic plants were removed
© Parks Canada / Conan Webb / 2003

Research and Monitoring


Daphne is one of the more prominent exotic plants in Garry oak ecosystems
Daphne is one of the more prominent exotic plants in Garry oak ecosystems
© Parks Canada / Conan Webb / 2003

Some of the research Parks Canada has undertaken at Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse NHSC include the completion of a rare plant inventory and the mapping and description of vegetation communities. Also, Parks Canada, in collaboration with the Pacific Forestry Centre, initiated a research program on the life cycle and means of controlling an introduced invasive species known as false laurel ( Daphne laureola ).

Public Education

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Sites of Canada now have a panel interpreting the importance of Garry oak ecosystems. Printed material such as posters, fact sheets and information cards are also available.

Volunteers help remove exotic plants from Garry oak ecosystems
Volunteers help remove exotic plants from Garry oak ecosystems
© Parks Canada / Conan Webb / 2003

In the new Gulf Islands National Park , a series of speakers dealing with Garry oak ecosystems, local conservation and ecology, and species at risk was organized for community members.

Another active way to learn is to volunteer for research and monitoring programs, or to partake in the removal of invasive species.