Common menu bar links

Lachine Canal National Historic Site

What's New

The Government of Canada announces new investment in Parks Canada’s historic canals in Quebec

The Honorable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, and Luc-André Mercier, Director of the Quebec Waterways The Honorable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, and Luc-André Mercier, Director of the Quebec Waterways
© Parks Canada

March 29, 2016, Montréal, Quebec, Parks Canada Agency

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, today announced an investment of more than $170 million to protect and preserve Parks Canada’s five historic canals in Quebec.

Canada’s National Parks are a vital part of who we are as a country – they bring our communities together and represent our shared heritage.

Today’s major investment will be used to conduct reconstruction work on the walls of the Lachine Canal, on the impressive lock of the Carillon Canal, and on the locks and bridges of the Chambly Canal. The funding will also be allocated to rehabilitate and reconstruct heritage-value buildings – such as the Chambly Canal superintendent’s house – and to build structures that preserve biodiversity, such as the Vianney-Legendre Fish Ladder on the Saint Ours Canal. Finally, service areas and footpaths will be built for the Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal, in order to increase the experience for all visitors.

The Government of Canada will continue to make investments in our environment to ensure that our children and grandchildren are left with a country even more beautiful, sustainable, and prosperous than the one we have now.

Quote

“Through this significant investment, our government is protecting and preserving these treasured places, while supporting local economies, contributing to growth in the tourism sector, and enhancing the charm and attractiveness of these heritage sites. I encourage Canadians to visit and experience Parks Canada’s special places and to enjoy the outdoors, while learning about our rich history and heritage.”

- The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Quick facts

  • Parks Canada is the largest provider of natural and cultural tourism products in Canada and its destinations form the cornerstones of the Canadian tourism industry.
  • The Lachine Canal, which draws more than 1.2 million visitors, is an important gathering place and tourist attraction in Montreal.
  • National Historic canals are a defining feature of Canada and encourage communities and visitors to discover their beautiful landscapes, recreational opportunities and unique connection to our history.
  • Parks Canada is present in hundreds of communities across Canada and contributes approximately $3 billion dollars to the Canadian economy every year. Parks Canada’s overall contribution to the Canadian economy is responsible for more than 40,000 jobs from coast to coast to coast.
  • Parks Canada is investing an unprecedented $3 billion dollars over 5 years to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada.

The Lachine Canal in the Heart of Montréal


Passage of a Boat Through a Lock
Passage of a Boat Through
a Lock at Chambly Canal

© Parks Canada

Lockage Fees

Following extensive comments and ideas on the proposed canal lockage fee, Minister Kent announced on May 14, 2013, that Parks Canada will freeze recreational lockage fees along Canada's historic canals for three years at 2008 levels.

More information


One of the most beautiful urban circuit in the world!
One of the most beautiful urban circuit in the world!
© Parks Canada

Canal’s Path Maintenance

The Lachine Canal’s path is maintained from April 15th to November 15th each year.

The Lachine Canal National Historic Site’s path was ranked third among the world’s top urban cycling trips by the American magazine TIME.

Read the article

Did you know?

The Lachine Canal path was inaugurated in 1978. Part of its route follows the former towpath built when the canal opened in 1825. This path was used by horses that towed or pulled dismasted sailing vessels between Lachine and the Old Port.