Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Precambrian Region


Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Precambrian Region


Common Loon
Common Loon

WHERE NORTH MEETS SOUTH

This is loon country, cottage country, famous for its dazzling autumn forests of scarlet and gold and its innumerable lakes and waterways. Like the boreal shield country to the north, this region is deeply ingrained into the image of Canada.

THE LAND:

Although this region has three separate sections, it is united by two distinctive characteristics: the mixed forest of coniferous and deciduous trees and the ancient bedrock of the southern edge of the Canadian Shield. The entire region is a transition zone, where species from the deciduous forests to the south intermingle with those of the boreal forests to the north and, to a lesser extent, those from the western plains, the Atlantic coast and the Arctic. Each section is remarkably similar in appearance - knobbly wooded hills incised by rivers and streams and dotted with thousands of lakes. Rivers and streams run slowly, backed up by numerous beaver dams and rocky ledges.

The effects of the Ice Age are everywhere written on the land. Extensive areas of exposed bedrock are common, much of it scraped smooth by the glaciers; in other areas, deposits left by ancient meltwater rivers soften the relief.

St. Lawrence Islands
St. Lawrence Islands

region


National Parks System Plan, 3 rd Edition
Previous Table of contents Next