Common menu bar links

Northern Yukon


STATUS OF NATIONAL PARKS:

Ivvavik National Park (10,168 km2) and Vuntut National Park (4,345 km2) represent this natural region. Part of Ivvavik, the coastal plain portion, extends into the MacKenzie Delta Natural Region (Region 10). These two parks were initially both part of one national park proposal, first advanced in 1978, but were established as separate national parks at different times because they fall into two Aboriginal land claim areas. Planning and management of the two parks are coordinated to the greatest extent possible.

High mountains, broad river valleys, endless tundra and the Arctic seacoast come together within Ivvavik National Park to create a wilderness paradise.

The Firth River is the centrepiece of the park, renowned for its beauty, white water rafting, archeological sites, and wildlife. The park includes part of the British Mountains, the only extensive non-glaciated mountain range in Canada.

Firth River
Firth River
© Parks Canada

These are rounded treeless mountains cut by smooth sweeping river valleys. The tree line - the limit beyond which trees do not grow higher than two metres - runs through this section of the park, which also harbours Canada's most northerly populations of moose and Dall's sheep.

Ivvavik was established in 1984 through agreement between the Inuvialuit of the Western Arctic and the Government of Canada. Initially known as Northern Yukon National Park, the park was given an Inuvialuit name in 1992. It is Canada's first national park established through a native-land claim settlement.

Natural Region 9
Natural Region 9
© Parks Canada

Vuntut National Park was established through settlement of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement, one of the Council for Yukon Indians comprehensive land claims, and scheduled under the National Parks Act in 1995.

It includes a portion of the Old Crow Flats and represents the interior plain themes of the natural region. Part of the park is designated a Ramsar Site, a wetland of international importance.


National Parks System Plan, 3rd Edition

PreviousTable of contentsNext