Common menu bar links

Impacts on Arctic Parks

Image of a muskox skull lying in grass
Predicted changes in the vegetation of Tuktut Nogait National Park could cause muskoxen to disappear from the park.
© Parks Canada / Lynch, W. / 12.123.10.04(08), 3/30/1994

Our Arctic parks are experiencing the greatest degree of change because of the substantial rise in temperature and an increase in summer precipitation. Arctic wildlife species often occur at the limits of their geographic ranges. Therefore, they are especially vulnerable to ecological changes. For example, predicted changes in the vegetation of Tuktut Nogait National Park of Canada could cause muskoxen to disappear from the park.

Auyuittuq National Park of Canada will be warmer year-round. Its glaciers will shrink, runoff will increase and the character of its shoreline may change. Park wildlife will be affected in unpredictable ways. Auyuittuq's summer weather may become wetter and foggier. This will affect the plants and animals as well as the travel plans of park visitors.

Dark picture of glaciers and clouds
The Auyuittuq National Park glaciers will shrink, summer weather may become wetter and foggier.
© Parks Canada / Beedle, M. / 13.03.03.10(72), 3/30/1981

Most of Vuntut National Park of Canada was unglaciated during the last ice age. The area is, therefore, very interesting for archaeologists and paleoecologists (scientists who study ancient ecosystems). Unfortunately, the fossils and artefacts could be damaged by the increase in erosion and biological activity.

Changes in wildlife populations will also affect the traditional cultures of Canada's northern residents.