Common menu bar links

Management Plan

3.0 Vision

Looking to the Future

Management planning invites all Canadians to think about the future of their national parks and historic sites, to envision what kind of places they should be, and to participate in identifying the actions that will make that vision a reality.

A Vision for Rogers Pass National Historic Site

Cultural resources in the national historic site are known, protected, presented and monitored on a regular basis. Many important features are intact such as the Cascade Creek bridge, Glacier Station and some of the Loop Brook trestle piers. Intervention has minimized deterioration of these and other cultural resources, and the remaining features and artifacts have been ruins for almost a century.

The Rogers Pass story is well understood. Site visitors experience a strong sense of place. Key historic themes are easily learned by visitors, through-travellers and those who experience Rogers Pass through off-site programs. The artifacts and ruins tell a human story of achievement that spans a century.

The site is presented in context, as an important part of Glacier National Park, a part of Canada's national dream, a part of the Canadian Pacific Railway story, and of the opening of the Columbia Mountains' frontier.

People are aware of the site. It is a prominent part of a visitor's national park experience. People appreciate the site enough to become engaged in protection and presentation opportunities. Dedicated and passionate staff and volunteers protect and present the site. Contemporary facilities associated with the site, such as the Rogers Pass Discovery Centre and self-guiding trails, are of high quality.

A Vision for Mount Revelstoke National Park and Glacier National Park

Mount Revelstoke National Park and Glacier National Park are symbols of Canadian wilderness. The parks harbour a natural abundance and diversity of native plants and animals. Intact landscapes and natural processes support a self-sustaining biological community representative of the Columbia Mountains. The most significant natural resources of the national parks are known and monitored on a regular basis.

The most significant cultural resources in the national parks are known, stable, preserved, presented and monitored on a regular basis. The stories of the Columbia Mountains Natural Region are well understood by target audiences. Key natural themes are easily learned by visitors, through-travellers and those who experience the parks off-site. Park visitors experience a strong sense of place.

The parks are presented in context, as part of a larger ecological region and as part of Canada's national legacy. High quality visitor opportunities are offered through a modest number of rustic, well-maintained ecologically sensitive facilities. Dedicated and passionate staff, volunteers and commercial operations protect and present the parks and serve the public. There has been no new facility development in the parks since 2002, except for those changes that contributed to the improvement of ecological and commemorative integrity or public safety.

Visitors, through-travellers, and those who experience the parks off-site know the beauty of the parks and are inspired to live in accord with and learn from their environment. The parks are places where ecological processes evolve in harmony with surrounding provincial lands. The parks are an integral part of the social and economic fabric of the region.

The transportation corridor is safe, well-maintained, ecologically sensitive and offers an enjoyable national park experience.


< Previous Page  | Table of Contents  | Next Page  >