Periodic Report on the Application of the
World Heritage Convention

Section II

Report on the State of Conservation of
Dinosaur Provincial Park


1 INTRODUCTION

1a State Party
CANADA
1b Name of World Heritage Site
Dinosaur Provincial Park
1c Geographic Coordinates
Latitude 50°44'49"N / Longitude 111°28'14"W
1d Date of inscription
26/01/79
1e Date of subsequent extension(s)
10/07/92
1f Organization(s) responsible for the preparation of report
Organization Name: Alberta Community Development
Name: Landals, Archie
Title: Director, Heritage Protection and Recreation Management Bran
Address: 2nd Floor, Oxbridge Place, 9820-106 Street
City: Edmonton, Alberta
Postal Code: T5K 2J6
Telephone: 780 427-9470
Fax Number: 780 427-5209
Email: Archie.Landals@gov.ab.ca
1g Date of submittal of report
31/12/04
1h Signature(s) on behalf of State Party
Christina Cameron-Director General, National Historic Sites, Parks Canada
 

2 STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

2a Original justification for inscription
Dinosaur Provincial Park was nominated for its Cretaceous fossil beds, riparian habitats and badlands environment.

The Upper Cretaceous dinosaur fossils are unmatched in terms of number and variety of high quality specimens. Sixty species representing more than 45 genera and seven families have been discovered. Over 300 museum quality specimens have been recovered and are displayed in some 30 major museums world wide.

The riparian habitats are an outstanding example of the ongoing development of a significant community complex within the semi-arid grassland biome. The richness and abundance of breeding birds is notable. A number of species of plants and birds are either rare or at their biogeographical limits.

The badlands environment constitutes an area of superlative natural features forming a landscape of exceptional natural beauty. The site is an outstanding example of natural geological process and fluvial erosion patterns in a semi-arid environment.


2b Criteria for initial inscription
Cultural Criteria:
Natural Criteria:
i
iii

2c Agreed upon Statement of Significance
At the time of inscription, the World Heritage Committee did not agree upon a Statement of Significance.
Proposed Statement of Significance
The Committee inscribed Dinosaur Provincial Park under criteria N(i) and N(iii).

In addition to its particularly beautiful scenery, Dinsoaur Provincial Park – located in the heart of the Province of Alberta's badlands- contains some of the most important fossil discoveries ever made from the "Age of Reptiles", in particular about 35 species of dinosaurs, dating back some 75 million years.

(Note: The Statement of Significance proposed here reflects the definitions and numbering of the criteria at the time the site was inscribed on the World Heritage List. Changes in the definitions and numbering of the criteria since that time will need to be taken into account when officially submitting a Statement of Significance to the World Heritage Committee for approval.)

2d Criteria added after initial inscription
Since the initial inscription, the World Heritage Committee has not added additional criteria to the inscription.
 

3 STATEMENT OF AUTHENTICITY/INTEGRITY

3a Initial evaluation of authenticity/integrity
In the evaluation of the Dinosaur Provincial Park nomination the IUCN concluded that "the area included in the World Heritage submission includes all of the area required to maintain the integrity of the proposal."

3b Significant changes in authenticity/integrity
Since inscription, there have been significant changes in the authenticity/integrity of the site.
Description of changes in authenticity/integrity
Integrity of the property has been enhanced by the expansion of the World Heritage Site. In 1992 the World Heritage Committee accepted a proposal by Canada and Alberta to expand the boundary of the World Heritage Site. The expansion of approximately 1,700 hectares (4,200 acres) added badlands and coulees with significant palaeontological fossil bearing strata to the World Heritage Site. Closer working relationships with adjacent land owners and leasees has helped to minimize unobserved public access to remote areas of the World Heritage Site. Research staff of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology have provided a greater presence in remote areas of the site, helping to minimize unauthorized collection of fossils.
 

4 MANAGEMENT

Management Regime

4a Ownership/Management
Management under protective legislation
Management under contractual agreement(s) between State Party and a third party
Description: The entire World Heritage Site is under the authority of the Historical Resources Act which prohibits the unauthorized excavation and collection of fossils. Those portions of the World Heritage Site that are within Dinosaur Provincial Park are also under the authority of the Provincial Parks Act. Provincial parks are developed and maintained a) for the conservation and management of flora and fauna, b) for the preservation of specified areas and objects therin that are of geological, cultural, ecological or other scientific interest, and c) to facilitate their use and enjoyment for outdoor recreation. Agreements with Special Areas Board and the Eastern Irrigation District (EID) are the basis of management of those portions of the World Heritage Site that are outside the boundaries of Dinosaur Provincial Park. Special Areas is a form of local government established under the Alberta Municipal Government Act. The Special Areas Board manages large tracts of Crown owned native grasslands for domestic grazing. EID owns large tracts of native grassland south of Dinosaur Provincial Park, which it manages for domestic grazing. Lands owned by both of these entities are included within the park and World Heritage Site on the basis of written agreements with the park. The Special Areas Board and EID are both fully committed to the preservation of the World Heritage Site and the surrounding native grasslands.

4b Level of authority
State/provincial/territorial

Description: Most of the lands within the World Heritage Site are included within Dinosaur Provincial Park. North of the park the World Heritage Site extends into lands administered by the Special Areas Board as stated above. World Heritage Site lands south of the park are owned and administered by the Eastern Irrigation District.


4c Legal status
Most of the lands within the World Heritage Site are included within Dinosaur Provincial Park. North of the park the World Heritage Site extends into lands administered by the Special Areas Board as stated above. World Heritage Site lands south of the park are owned and administered by the EID. The Special Areas Board and the EID administer and manage cattle grazing on these lands. All other activities within the World Heritage Site are managed by Alberta Community Development. The Site Manager of Dinsoaur Provincial Park is the one window of contact for all matters pertaining to the park and World Heritage Site.

4d Agency/agencies with management authority
Agency Name: Alberta Community Development
Name: Huggill, Rob
Title:
Address: Box 1690 Provincial Building 220- 4th Avenue West
City: Brooks, Alberta
Postal Code: T1R 1C5
Telephone: 403 387-4342
Fax Number:
Email: Rob.Huggill@gov.ab.ca

4e Protective measures and means of implementing them
Provincial Parks Act and associated regulations and the Historical Resources Act apply to World Heritage Site lands that are within Dinosaur Provincial Park. World Heritage Site lands outside of the park are protected under the Historical Resources Act. The Provincial Parks Act does not apply to these lands.

4f Administrative and management arrangements
Overall day-to-day management and administration of the park and World Heritage Site is the responsibility of the Parks and Protected Areas Division of Alberta Community Development. The Cultural Facilities and Historical Resources Division of Alberta Community Development conducts most of the fossil research in the park and manages the research component of the Dinosaur Field Station. Written agreements with the Special Areas Board and the EID are the basis for managing World Heritage Site lands owned by these two entities and cattle grazing.

A glyphstone or ribstone (a large stone with hand carved figures), a rare native cultural artifact was moved to the park to afford proper protection once its place of origin was converted to intensive agriculture. After consultation with the Siksika Nation, the glyphstone has been protected by a steel structure on the Prairie Trail. The wish of the native community is that the stone be properly interpreted so it can contribute to the public's understanding of native culture and history.

4g Significant changes in management regime since inscription
The Alberta Government has acquired title to some of the lands within Dinosaur Provincial Park that were titled to the EID. These lands were already within the provincial park and World Heritage Site and managed under the authority of the Provincial Parks Act.

4h Management plan
There is a management plan in place for the site.
Summary of management plan
The management plan for Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site provides a long-term vision and day-to-day guidance for stewardship of the park. Department staff prepared the plan within the context of existing legislation and regulations and the intent and spirit of the World Heritage Convention. It outlines the type and extent of outdoor recreation and tourism opportunities, facilities and services. The plan provides direction regarding the delivery of heritage appreciation programs that assist Albertans and visitors to understand and appreciate the natural and cultural heritage of the park and World Heritage Site while ensuring its ongoing preservation.

The management plan was developed with public input and is intended to provide for periodic review and revision to reflect the current thinking of Albertans on how the natural and cultural heritage will be preserved for present and future generations.

There has been ongoing implementation of the management plan since the earliest interim drafts. Annual operating plans outline the details of annual implementation and progress toward implementing the management plan.

Financial Resources

4i Annual operating budget
C$ 602 211

Staffing Levels (Human Resources)

4j Staffing levels
Full time: 5
Part time: 0
Seasonal: 20
Other: 11
Permanent:
Operations Supervisor
Office Manager
Visitor Services Officer
Maintenance Supervisor
Conservation Officer

Seasonal:
7 – visitor services
5 – maintenance
3 – conservation officers
5 – administrative

Visitor Services staff require a Bachelor of Science in biological, geological, or environmental science plus several years experience in developing and delivering interpretive programs. They have in-depth knowledge of natural history and palaeontology as well as the history and pre-history associated with the park. All are excellent communicators and have a variety of skills in the performing arts, including acting, voice, movement, music, script writing, directing, costume and set design etc.

Conservation officers have a degree or diploma in conservation or natural resources management and experience in the field of park management. They must be certified in defensive tactics and the use of firearms.

In the spring of 2003 the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology had 11 staff working in the World Heritage Site. For most of the field season (May-early July) there are 5 or 6 staff. These numbers are pretty typical for the past few years. From September to March one or two staff members work about 2 days a week in the Dinosaur Field Station. Staff of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology are either fully qualified palaeontologists or are under the direct supervision of these scientists.

There are typically one or two visiting scientists and students in camp at any given time.

A paying-participant program includes between 40 and 50 participants per year.

Sources of expertise and training in conservation and management techniques

4k Sources of specialized expertise, training and services
All staff and paid participants associated with fossil excavations and research in the World Heritage Site are under the direct supervision and training of staff of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology. Museum staff are highly qualified, internationally recognized palaeontologists.

Visitation

4l Visitor statistics available
Visitor statistics are available for the site.
Annual visitation, methodology and trends
Recent visitor origin surveys have not been conducted. General estimates are based on park staff observations. These suggest that a high percentage of the park's visitors are from outside Alberta. The average length of stay for campers is one and a half to two days. The majority of park visitors are day users. The ratio of day users to campers has declined recently due to the increased capacity of the park's campground from 43 to 126 sites between 1993 and 1995.

Park visitation is high from late May through August and lower in the shoulder seasons. A total of 84,340 people visited the park in 2000. 61 per cent of these were day users (51,448) and 39 per cent were campers (32,892). In 2000, the campground was at an average occupancy of 80 per cent over the months of July and August. Park visitation has increased by over 100% since 1990, when 41,913 people came to Dinosaur Provincial Park during the summer. Improved marketing, particularly the park's website, and word-of-mouth advertising continues to increase park attendance figures.

Records indicate that in the May to September period of 1980 there were 34,347-day visitors and 15,621 campers. Methodologies used to collect visitor use at that time differ from those used today and direct comparison is not possible, especially for day visitors. Actual numbers were probably significantly lower.

4m Visitor facilities
Support facilities are designed to accommodate comfortable visitor stays of 3 to 4 days and include:
· 126 unit campground (59 sites serviced with power)
· day use area and canoe launch
· one amphitheatre
· one group camp
· five tour buses for guided interpretative tours in the restricted area
· concession/service centre with fast food, laundry, washroom and shower facilities
· the John Ware Historic cabin with exhibits
· the Dinosaur Field Station which includes a small amphitheatre and public displays in addition to the palaeontological research facilities. The "Friends of Dinosaur" operate a small book store and gift shop and sell tickets for the bus tours from the station.
· Four insitu palaeontological displays one of which is a mock up of the centrasaurus bone bed.

4n Tourism/visitor management plan
There is a tourism/visitor management plan in place for the site.
Summary of tourism/visitor management plan
A visitor services development plan was completed for the park in 1985. This plan provided the direction for development of trails, amphitheatre, self-guided auto tour, bus tour displays and interpretative and educational programming for these facilities as well as the Dinosaur Field Station.

A new plan has been prepared which provides direction for programming and displays for the expanded Field Station as well as bringing interpretive and educational programs up to contemporary standards.

Scientific studies

4o Key scientific studies and research programs
In any given year, several research projects are undertaken in Dinosaur Provincial Park. The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is the principal research institution working in the park. Research is conducted in areas of palaeontology, geology/sedimentology, and palaeo-botany. Staff of the Royal Tyrrell Museum have been working in the park since the late 1970's. Their work was greatly enhanced with the construction of the Dinosaur Field Station that opened in 1987. Park and museum staff continue to work together in support of their respective mandates. A list of publications related to palaeontological research is attached.

In 1996, park staff initiated collaborative research projects for the prairie rattlesnake and plains cottonwood. An intensive five-year field research program was undertaken to establish baseline data on populations and movement of snakes within the park. While the formal research program has ended, the collection of pertinent data continues.

Research on the plains cottonwood is focussing on practical methods to enhance natural regeneration in the heavily used facility zone with only minimal success to date.
Use of results of scientific studies and research programs
Palaeontological research results in new information that is incorporated into interpretive and educational programs as well as displays in the Dinosaur Field Station and the Royal Tyrrell Museum.

Maintaining trees in the campground is important for shade and aesthetics as well as wildlife movement along the river.

Rattlesnake research is helping to minimize conflicts with visitors and reduce the number of snakes relocated or killed. Information is used in educational programs.
Role of WHS designation in design of scientific studies and research programs
Most of the research in Dinosaur Provincial Park is focussed on the World Heritage values, that is, the fossils. World Heritage designation no doubt increased public support for the establishment of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology and ongoing palaeontological research in Alberta and in the World heritage Site. International collaboration on fossil research may have been enhanced as a result of World Heritage designation. Research in Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site has contributed significantly to the world knowledge of the geologic time period represented in the park. A list of publications related to palaeontological research in Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site is appended to this report.

Education, Information and Awareness Building


4p WHS plaque
There is a plaque at the site indicating that it is a World Heritage Site.

4q Use of WHC logo
The World Heritage Convention logo is used on all publications for the site.

4r Educational programs for schools
There are not any educational programs about the site's World Heritage values aimed at schools.

4s Special events and exhibitions
There are no special events and exhibitions concerning the site's World Heritage values.

4t Facilities, visitor centre, site museum, trails, guides, information materials
· one amphitheatre
· five tour buses for guided interpretative tours in the restricted area
· the John Ware Historic cabin with exhibits
· the Dinosaur Field Station which includes a small amphitheatre and public displays in addition to the palaeontological research facilities. The "Friends of Dinosaur" operate a small book store and gift shop and sell tickets for the bus tours from the station.
· Four insitu palaeontological displays one of which is a mock up of the centrasaurus bone bed.
· Self guided trails with interpretive signage and information in the park newspaper.
· Guided, interpretive hikes that take about three hours into fossil sites in the restricted area of the park.
· The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Drumheller, about a two hour drive from the park has extensive displays that include fossils collected in the World Heritage Site.
· Park newspaper printed annually.

4u Role of WHS designation in education, information and awareness building activities
World Heritage has been incorporated into displays in the Dinosaur Field Station and is a component of interpretative programs. World Heritage is featured on the Dinosaur Provincial Park website and publications. World Heritage has not been used as a major marketing, promotional or educational tool.
 

5 FACTORS AFFECTING THE PROPERTY

5a Development Pressures
The only development pressure affecting Dinosaur Provincial Park is ongoing development of natural gas. All wells are drilled outside the boundary of the World Heritage Site. Drilling takes place under frozen ground conditions and typically takes four of five days to complete a well. Well heads are kept low and painted neutral colours to minimize visual impacts. No roads are built to the well sites. Access is by dirt trails across grazing lands, thus minimizing new public access to Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site boundaries. There are no direct impacts on fossil resources in the Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site.

5b Environmental Pressures
There are no environmental pressures associated with the fossil of geologic processes in the Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site.

5c Natural Disasters and Preparedness
Natural disasters are not a threat to the World Heritage values. New fossil finds are the result of erosion that is enhanced by major rainstorms. Flooding of the Red Deer River is essential for regeneration of the riparian cottonwood forests.

5d Visitor/Tourism Pressures
Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site is able to cope with the current level of visitation with no negative impacts on the World Heritage values. The most significant fossil resources are located within the restricted zone (Nature Preserve) where a qualified guide must accompany visitors. There are, however, significant impacts in the Facility Zone of the park which require constant attention. Fossil materials are relatively scarce in the Facility Zone as the result of removal. Since monitoring visitor activity is difficult, public education through interpretive programs, print media, and the Fossil Finder program is the principal conservation tool. The Facility Zone is important from an educational standpoint as it illustrates the need for the Natural Preserve and the park's strict preservation/access regulations.

Cumulative impacts of hiking and scrambling on badland formations, particularly around the Dinosaur Field Station and campground result in deep paths, which are cut further by erosional forces. Trail hardening and restorative or protective actions are ongoing.

Soil compaction and devegetation from foot and vehicle traffic are problems in the campground. Signage and education are being used to gain public cooperation and support for the re-establishment of ground and tree cover in the campground. Parking of vehicles off gravel pads is a chronic problem that staff continue to addressed.

The removal of dead branches and trees (by campers for firewood) is discouraged to sustain the wildlife habitat that remains in the Facility Zone. Public education is a significant component of this effort

With a campground of 126 sites, many campfires are burning on any given night during peak season. Severe smoke problems have been experienced in the past when firewood was provided for free or at a minimal surcharge. Local topography and atmospheric conditions are conducive to poor circulation and smoke frequently hangs in the valley. The sale of firewood since 1996 has significantly reduced the amount of wood that is burned and, subsequently diminished air quality problems.

While the impacts in the Facility Zone do not impair the fossil and geomorphic values of the World Heritage Site they must be constantly addressed to retain a high quality visitor experience. Maintaining a high quality visitor experience has been identified as the most significant challenge facing Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site in the future. As the number of visitors increases so to will the demand for bus tours and guided walks into the restricted area. With sufficient staff and additional buses significantly more visitors could be moved through the site without impairment of the fossil resources or impacting the geomorphic processes. At some point, however, the quality of the experience will be significantly diminished. A current priority is to investigate options that will optimize the numbers of visitors that are able to visit the site while maintaining a high quality educational and interpretive experience.

5e Number of inhabitants within property, buffer zone
One permanent parks conservation officer lives on site. There are no other inhabitants.

5f Other
The most significant pressure facing Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site is the illegal removal of fossils. Illegal removal consists of casual pilfering of exposed, smaller fossils and infrequently the excavation of fossils. Two occurrences of fossil excavation have been documented in recent years. Efforts are being increased to reduce the incidence of illegal removal of fossils. Education is being expanded to reduce casual pilfering and park staff are increasing boundary patrols. More research staff in remote areas reduce the chances of fossil hunters being undetected. Neighbouring ranchers assist by reporting suspicious activities and controlling access. Licence numbers of observed vehicles are recorded for reference in the event that unauthorized excavations are discovered at a later date.
 

6 MONITORING

Administrative arrangements for monitoring property

6a Formal monitoring program
There is a formal monitoring program established for the site.
Description of formal monitoring program
Monitoring of World Heritage values (fossil locations) is ongoing. Known quarry sites are visited to look for evidence of new fossils exposed by erosion. Historic quarries are being relocated and marked. Prospecting to locate new fossil location occurs every spring. Prospecting focuses on a geographic area or particular stragigraphic interval as well as in the vicinity of working quarries. Staff of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology carry out the ongoing monitoring associated with fossils in the World Heritage Site. Park staff patrol boundaries and accessible locations.

Key indicators for measuring state of conservation

6b Agreed upon key indicators
No key indicators for measuring the state of conservation of the site's World Heritage values have been agreed upon.
Future development of key indicators
No key indicators are specifically being developed at this time but staff and surrounding land owners are constantly vigilant regarding unauthorized excavation and removal of fossils. Educational efforts are ongoing to reduce casual pilfering of fossils in high public use areas. Future efforts will be directed to reducing erosion and off trail use in the high public use areas.

Results of previous reporting exercises

6c State Party actions in response to World Heritage Committee recommendations
No recommendations from the World Heritage Committee were made at the time of inscription.

At the 16th session of the Bureau of the Committee in Paris, July 6-10, 1992, a proposal to change the boundary of Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site was reviewed by the Bureau. "The Bureau was in agreement with the proposal of the Canadian authorities to delete 423 hectares (1,045 acres), where petroleum and natural gas exploration will take place, and add 2,133 hectares (5,271 acres) of significantly higher conservation value to this site. In effect, the proposed modification of the boundaries of the site has resulted in a net gain of about 1,700 hectares (4,201 acres)in the total area of this Park. The Bureau recommended that the Committee register the report and the map provided by the Canadian authorities describing the revised boundaries of this World Heritage Site ". The Committee registered the report and the map as a description of the revised boundaries of Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site at the Sixteenth session (Santa Fe, United States of America, 7-14 December 1992).

No specific recommendation accompanied this reactive report.
 

7 CONCLUSIONS

World Heritage Values

7a Main conclusions regarding the state of the property's World Heritage Values
Ongoing palaeontological research has continued to demonstrate the significance of Upper Cretaceous fossils and expand the knowledge of the paleo environments found in Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site . The integrity of the property has been enhanced by the expansion of the World Heritage Site and by developing closer working relationships with adjacent land owners and leasees to help minimizing unobserved public access to remote areas. Research staff have provided a greater presence in remote areas helping to minimize unauthorized collection of fossils.

Management and factors affecting site

7b Main conclusions regarding the management of and factors affecting the property
Overall management of Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site has continued to improve since inscription. A visitor services development plan was completed for the park in 1985. A resource management plan was completed in 1990; the general management plan was updated in 2003. Written agreements have been signed with the Special Areas Board and the EID as the basis for managing World Heritage Site lands owned by these two entities. There is a significant complement of highly qualified park management staff, visitor service staff and research scientists associated with the park.

Park facilities have been expanded and improved with a new campground and the Dinosaur Field Station. Visitor programs have been expanded with the Field Station and bus tours. Overall visitation has increased but not to the point where there are serious negative impacts on either park resources or visitor experiences. An expansion to the Field Station is in the planning stages and a new visitor management plan is being prepared to update the delivery of public programs both on and off site.

Scientific research in areas of palaeontology, geology/sedimentology, and palaeo-botany is active and ongoing. Numerous articles related to this research have been published.

Ongoing development of natural gas outside the boundary of the World Heritage Site is being carefully managed. Stringent guidelines ensure there are no impacts on fossil resources and visitor experiences.

The most significant pressure facing Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site is the illegal removal of fossils. A priority is placed on patrolling the park and working closely with neighbouring land owners to minimize this.

Proposed Future Action(s)

7c Approved future actions
Facilities
An expansion of the Dinosaur Field Station has been approved. The expansion will provide for greater display space and educational opportunities related to fossils and the environment of the World Heritage Site.

Land Acquisition
A land exchange has been completed with the EID. The Crown now owns approximately 930 hectares (2,298 acres) that were previously leased from the EID. These lands are already part of Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site. An additional 725 hectares (1,791 acres) of native grassland were also acquired. These new lands were added to the park on July 27, 2004. Overall management of the park and World Heritage Site will be strengthened by these additions.

Visitor Services Plan
The visitor service plan for the park and World Heritage Site has been updated as part of identifying the program requirement for the Field Station expansion. Program messages will be reviewed and updated as required.

Staffing
A Site Manager position for Dinosaur Provincial Park was created and filled in 2003. This position has a higher level of authority than the previous ranger in charge of the park.

Three new positions: a Planning Team Leader, a Heritage Appreciation Team Leader and a Heritage Protection Specialist were created in 2003. These positions serve the broader region but their professional expertise will be available to Dinosaur Provincial Park and the World Heritage Site.

Tourism Management
A jointly funded study with Alberta Economic Development to examine "best practices" regarding tourism management in high use parks has been completed. The study looked at options to deliver high quality tourism and interpretation programs to large numbers of people while preserving the resource and the opportunity. Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site is being used as a pilot test site. Over the coming years effort will be made to work with the surrounding communities to increase the profile of Dinosaur Provincial Park as a World Heritage Site as the department moves to implement recommendations from the best practices study. These efforts will be used to initiate an updated management plan for the park and World Heritage Site.

Fossil Removal

Efforts are being increased to reduce the incidence of illegal removal of fossils from Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site. Educational efforts have been expanded to combat casual pilfering of fossils and park staff are undertaking more frequent patrols of the boundary. Research staff observe people they see in remote areas of the park. Neighbouring ranchers are assisting by reporting suspicious activities and by helping to control and record access to remote areas of the site. License numbers of observed vehicles are being recorded for reference in the event that future excavations are discovered.

Responsible Implementing Agency(ies)

7d Agency(ies) responsible for implementing actions
Agency Name: Alberta Community Development
Name: Landals, Archie
Title:
Address: 2nd Floor, Oxbridge Place, 9820-106 Street
City: Edmonton, Alberta
Postal Code: T5K 2J6
Telephone: 780 427-9470
Fax Number: 780 427-5209
Email: Archie.Landals@gov.ab.ca

Timeframe for Implementation

7e Timeline for implementation of actions
The actions will be implemented progressively, as possible, over the next five years.

Needs for International Assistance

7f Anticipated Requests for International Assistance
It is not anticipated that International Assistance, through the World Heritage Fund, will be requested.

Actions State Party Intends to Request from World Heritage Committee

7g Potential Decisions for the World Heritage Committee
  • Proposed new Statement of Significance, where previously missing