Common menu bar links

Periodic Report on the Application of the
World Heritage Convention

Section II

Report on the State of Conservation of
Gros Morne National Park
 

1 INTRODUCTION
 

1a State Party
CANADA
1b Name of World Heritage Site
Gros Morne National Park
1c Geographic Coordinates
Latitude 49°20' - 49°55' N / Longitude 57°25' - 58°10' W
1d Date of inscription
11/12/87
1e Date of subsequent extension(s)
Not applicable

1f Organization(s) responsible for the preparation of report

Organization Name: Parks Canada
Name: Bird, Chip
Title: Field Unit Superintendent, Newfoundland West & Labrador Field Unit
Address: P.O. Box 130
City: Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland and Labrador
Postal Code: A0K 4N0
Telephone: 709 458-2417
Fax Number: 709 458-2059
Email: chip.bird@pc.gc.ca
 

To the top

2 STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

2a Original justification for inscription
In the original nomination, Canada stated that Gros Morne National Park's internationally significant natural heritage values, set in a spectacular wilderness environment of awe-inspiring scenery, are of universal interest and importance. Canada nominated the park to the World Heritage List under criterion i, outstanding representation of major stages of the Earth's evolutionary history. The rocks of Gros Morne National Park collectively present an internationally significant illustration of the process of continental drift as it relates to the eastern coast of North America, and contribute to the scientific community's knowledge and understanding of plate tectonics. By virtue of Gros Morne's spectacular landscape, Canada also nominated the park to the World Heritage List under criterion iii, an area of exceptional natural beauty. Canada noted that the park has sufficient size and integrity to protect the key features in perpetuity.
 

2b Criteria for initial inscription
Cultural Criteria:
Natural Criteria:

i
iii
 

2c Agreed upon Statement of Significance
At the time of inscription, the World Heritage Committee did not agree upon a Statement of Significance.
Proposed Statement of Significance
The World Heritage Committee inscribes Gros Morne National Park, Canada on the basis of natural criteria (i) and (iii).
Criterion (i):The rocks of Gros Morne National Park collectively present an internationally significant illustration of the process of continental drift as it relates to the eastern coast of North America and contributes greatly to the scientific community's knowledge and understanding of plate tectonics.
Criterion (iii):Gros Morne National Park is set in a spectacular wilderness environment of awe-inspiring scenery, an area of exceptional natural beauty.

(Note: The Statement of Significance proposed here reflects the definitions and numbering of the criteria at the time the site was inscribed on the World Heritage List. Changes in the definitions and numbering of the criteria since that time will need to be taken into account when officially submitting a Statement of Significance to the World Heritage Committee for approval.)
 

2d Criteria added after initial inscription
Since the initial inscription, the World Heritage Committee has not added additional criteria to the inscription.
 

To the top

3 STATEMENT OF AUTHENTICITY/INTEGRITY

3a Initial evaluation of authenticity/integrity
In the nomination of Gros Morne National Park, Canada noted that the park has sufficient size and integrity to protect the key features in perpetuity.

In its evaluation of the nomination, the IUCN observed that prior to its protection in 1973, the area was subject to various uses, which had resulted in some depletion of wildlife populations and forest cover. It noted further however, that, since then, establishment and management of the park had largely excluded resource harvesting and such use that was taking place was carried out according to management strategies developed in cooperation with area residents. IUCN commented on the presence of the local communities, but concluded that the geological features on which the nomination rested would not be adversely affected in the long term by modest shifts in populations and development in these communities. With respect to criterion (iii) - that of an area of exceptional beauty - IUCN also considered the size and physical and biological integrity of the area protected to be sufficient.
 

3b Significant changes in authenticity / integrity
Since inscription, there have been significant changes in the authenticity / integrity of the site.
Description of changes in authenticity / integrity
There have been no negative changes to authenticity or integrity, however, the guidelines established to manage resource use activities within the park aim to maintain and increase ecological integrity (see 5e).
 

To the top

4 MANAGEMENT

MANAGEMENT REGIME
4a Ownership/Management

Management under protective legislation
Description: Gros Morne is not yet officially established by proclamation as a national park. At present, Parks Canada is using a combination of national and provincial regulations (see 4e) to manage the property until the park comes under the protective legislation of the Canada National Parks Act (2000) and the Parks Canada Agency Act. Gros Morne National Park's eventual inclusion under the Canada National Parks Act will afford its heritage resources consistent levels of protection with all other national parks across Canada.
 

4b Level of authority
National
Description: The Parks Canada Agency falls under the authority of the federal Department of Environment. The Agency is responsible for the establishment and management of national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas.
 

4c Legal status
Gros Morne is a federally owned property and managed by Parks Canada, however, it has yet to be proclaimed as an official national park (see 4b).
 

4d Agency/agencies with management authority

Agency Name: Parks Canada
Name: Bird, Chip
Title: Field Unit Superintendent, Newfoundland West & Labrador Field Unit
Address: P.O. Box 130
City: Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland and Labrador
Postal Code: A0K 4N0
Telephone: 709 458-3539
Fax Number: 709 458-2836
Email: grosmorne.info@pc.gc.ca
 

Agency Name: Parks Canada
Name: Latourelle, Alan
Title: Chief Executive Officer
Address: 25 Eddy Street, 7th Floor
City: Gatineau, Quebec
Postal Code: K1A 0M5
Telephone: 819 997-9525
Fax Number: 819 953-9745
Email: alan.latourelle@pc.gc.ca
 

To the top

4e Protective measures and means of implementing them
Government of Canada Statutes:

  • The Canada National Parks Act states that "The national parks of Canada are hereby dedicated to the people of Canada for their benefit, education and enjoyment, subject to this Act and the regulations, and the parks shall be maintained and made use of so as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations." (s.4(1) CNPA ch 32 SC 1999-2000).
  • Parks Canada Agency Act - This act outlines the purpose of the agency, to ensure that Canada's national parks, national historic sites and related heritage areas are protected and presented for this and future generations and it outlines generally the manner in which this will be achieved.
  • Guiding Principles and Operational Policies
    Forestry Act
  • Migratory Bird Convention Act
  • Fisheries Act
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Act

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador (Provincial) Statutes:

  • Wildlife Act
  • Environmental Protection Act
  • All-Terrain Vehicle and Motorized Snow Vehicle Act.
     

4f Administrative and management arrangements
Gros Morne National Park is a part of the Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit; its office is located in Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland. At present, Parks Canada is using a combination of national and provincial regulations (see 4e) to manage the property until the park comes under the protective legislation of the Canada National Parks Act.

The Gros Morne Co-operating Association helps to manage the Recreation Complex, cross country ski trails and the gift shops. 95 per cent of the profit from these facilities is redirected towards the maintenance of facilities and delivery of programs. Two boat tours are operated by the private sector under a concession agreement with Parks Canada.

There are also a number of community management boards which help to manage specific activities by working with Parks Canada staff and making management recommendations to the Field Unit Superintendent (see 5e).
 

4g Significant changes in management regime since inscription
There have not been any significant changes to the ownership, legal status, contractual or traditional protective measures or management regime since the time of inscription.
 

4h Management plan
There is a management plan in place for the site.
Summary of management plan
Park management plans are required for all national parks under the Canada National Parks Act.

A management plan was approved in 1984. The plan outlines the management of the park with respect to zoning, natural and cultural resource conservation, interpretation, visitor use and services, partnerships, administration and operations.

The overall orientation of this initial management plan was to provide guidance and direction during the period when basic park infrastructure, management policies and operational techniques were being formulated and established. The plan provides for resource protection and management and user opportunities in each of the four zones within the park. This includes eight Zone 1 areas which have been identified as unique, rare or best examples of representative features present in Gros Morne National Park. The plan also outlines management objectives of traditional resource harvesting activities.

The plan is the collective result of contributions made by residents within the Park, members of the general public, interested organizations, concerned governmental agencies and Parks Canada staff. The contributions of these people will ensure that Gros Morne National Park will serve the interests of local people and of all Canadians in the future.

The park is to develop a new management plan in the next 2-3 years which will outline management strategies to ensure maintenance of ecological integrity and provide high quality visitor experiences.
 

FINANCIAL RESOURCES
4i Annual operating budget

C$ 6 844 000
 

STAFFING LEVELS (HUMAN RESOURCES)
4j Staffing levels
Full time: 48
Part time: 0
Seasonal: 74
Other: 48

The full time and season employees can be grouped by the following divisions/positions:

Field Unit Superintendent and staff - 3
Ecosystem and Cultural Resource Management
Including Wardens - 19
Strategic Planning
Including Communications - 8
Finance and Administration - 11
Client Services - 21
General Works and Utilities - 32
Visitor Services - 14
Interpreters - 5
Discovery Centre staff - 7

The 48 Other positions includes Young Canada Works Students, Federal Summer Work Employment Program Students and Term Positions.
 

SOURCES OF EXPERTISE AND TRAINING IN CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
4k Sources of specialized expertise, training and services
Atlantic Service Center and National Office staff including:

Cultural Resource Specialist, Archaeologists, Historian, Conservator, Historic Collections, Registrar, Science Advisory, Environmental Coordinator, Aboriginal Liaison Coordinator, Audio-visual Specialist, Interpretation Specialist, Graphic Designer, Information Management, Technical Support Specialist, Records Management Coordinator, Ceremonies and Special Events Coordinator, Planners, Translation Specialist, Real Property Officer.

Acadia University - expertise in Regional Ecosystem Management
Memorial University of Newfoundland - expertise in Human Use Management.
 

VISITATION
4l Visitor statistics available

Visitor statistics are available for the site.
Annual visitation, methodology and trends
The annual visitation is approximately 120,000 per year. Visitors are counted at specific locations in the park such as the entrance kiosk, visitor centre, Discovery Centre, and campgrounds. Visitation to Gros Morne is generally increasing.

4m Visitor facilities
The facilities at this site include:

  • Campground facilities at five locations throughout the park area provide over 300 camping lots ranging from primitive sites to those with kitchen shelters and showers.
  • Cross country skiing (groomed and natural) and snowshoe trails are available, including destinations to secluded wilderness cabins.
  • A number of hiking trails for the novice to the more advanced backcountry hiker.
  • A number of picnic areas with cookhouses.
  • Gift shops are located in the Visitor's Centre and Discovery Centre.
  • A food concession is located at the Discovery Centre.
  • Observation areas with telescopes and parking lots
  • A recreation complex in Rocky Harbour includes a 25 metre indoor pool, shallow bay, leisure harbour, whirlpool and shower facilities.
       

4n Tourism/visitor management plan
There is a tourism/visitor management plan in place for the site.
Summary of tourism/visitor management plan
Tourism and visitor management plans are incorporated into the park management plan.
 

To the top

SCIENTIFIC STUDIES
4o Key scientific studies and research programs

Studies that have been initiated since 1973 include:

  • Caribou herd dynamics and the effects of snowmobile use
  • Black bear, moose and caribou population ecology studies
  • Moose browse study
  • Arctic hare distribution, abundance and habitat
  • Newfoundland pine marten distribution and abundance
  • Invasive plant monitoring
  • Impacts of tour boats on Western Brook Pond
  • Impacts of visitors on Gros Morne Mountain
  • Fish populations and genetics studies
  • Weather monitoring
  • Rare plant inventory
  • Arctic and common tern study
  • Long-term vegetation plots
  • Monitoring of campsite impacts on the Long Range Traverse
  • Analysis of environmental contamination by road salt
  • Status of the mountain fern
  • Passerine bird population monitoring
  • Small mammal monitoring
  • Atlantic salmon stock assessment
  • Monitoring for the long-range transport of airborne pollutants
  • Monitoring Ecological Integrity in Gros Morne National
  • Park via changes to park landforms
  • Effect of increased habitat fragmentation on nest predation of forest nesting birds in the greater Gros Morne National Park ecosystem

Resource Conservation Function is currently rotating the following studies on a four-year cycle:

  • Evaluating species richness, population dynamics, succession patterns, productivity patterns, human land use patterns, pollution and climate change in the greater Gros Morne National Park ecosystem as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program
  • Evaluating the effects of forest landscape change in the greater Gros Morne National Park ecosystem
  • Evaluating the population viability and genetic significance of Gros Morne National Park fish populations

Use of results of scientific studies and research programs
The results of these research and monitoring programs have and will continue to be used as an early warning system to identify changes in the park's geological and biological components and are critical to our adaptive management framework. Current scientific studies are focussing on known stressors to the park, large-scale forest harvesting near the boundary, and increased fishing pressure in previously isolated watersheds. These studies directly input to decision making. For example, Parks Canada is currently working with the forestry industry and collaboratively studying the Main River watershed that is an area of 1,000 square kilometres adjacent to the World Heritage Site. The property's designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site played an important role in discussions with other stakeholders that led to this collaborative research. The watershed is a large intact land base of old growth forest with an important population of the endangered Newfoundland pine marten.

Role of WHS designation in design of scientific studies and research programs
The property's designation as a World Heritage Site has not played a role in the design of these scientific studies and research programs. They have been designed with the aim to maintain and improve the ecological integrity of the park.
 

EDUCATION, INFORMATION AND AWARENESS BUILDING
4p WHS plaque

There is a plaque at the site indicating that it is a World Heritage Site.
 

4q Use of WHC logo
The World Heritage Convention logo is not used on all publications for the site.
 

4r Educational programs for schools
There are educational programs about the site's World Heritage values aimed at schools.
Description of educational programs for schools
There is a Teachers' Institute offered during the summer months which takes place in partnership with all education stakeholders in the province. It is a curriculum based program designed to inform teachers about historic sites that they can then incorporate into their lectures in the classroom. The focus is on national parks and national historic sites in the province. It also provides information on World Heritage Site values.

Killdevil Summer Camp - gives students access to programs that introduce them to the values and the importance of World Heritage Sites.
School Groups - participate in interpretive walks of the Tablelands and other areas where they are introduced to World Heritage values of the park.

There is also an Outdoor Education Program for school grades five and eight.
     

4s Special events and exhibitions
There are special events and exhibitions concerning the site's World Heritage values.
Description of special events and exhibitions
The Discovery Centre - a centre designed to be a place to discover our World Heritage and has as a part of its main exhibit a geology display that acknowledges the site as a World Heritage Site.
Interpretive walks during the summer season explain the significance of the site and reasons for its designation as a World Heritage Site.

Programs prepared for television concerning Gros Morne also note the site's World Heritage status.
Information is also available on the Parks Canada website.
 

4t Facilities, visitor centre, site museum, trails, guides, information materials
In addition to the facilities described in 4m, the World Heritage Site has the following:

  • A Visitor's Centre located near Rocky Harbour that houses a reception desk, gift shop and a theatre that shows the films 'A Wonderful Fine Coast' which is an overview of the park and 'When Continents Collide' which tells about the geology of the park.
  • A Discovery Centre located near Woody Point. It offers interactive exhibits on the park's geology, plant and animal life, marine story and human history, discovery activities, Artist in Residence Program and demonstrations in traditional crafts. It also houses a theatre that shows the same two films that are avaiable at the Visitor's Centre.
  • Daytime interpretive activities in the park area include:
    Tablelands - Walk Upon the Earth's Mantle, Green Point - Stroll through Strata, The Great Shallow Bay Scavenger Hunt, Little Bog of Horrors Guided Walk and Bird Banding.
  • Evening programs and campfires provide entertainment and education on the park's history and natural environment.
  • There are more than 100 km of trails rated easy, moderate and strenuous and also includes the Wilderness/Long Range Traverse.
  • The Trout River Pond Boat Tour offers a 2.5 hr. cruise that highlights many of the geological features that led to the park's designation as a World Heritage Site.
  • The Western Brook Pond Boat Tour is a 2.5 hr. cruise on the parks' largest fjord pond which is located between massive billion-year-old cliffs.
  • Three boating ramps are located in either freshwater or saltwater areas of the park.
  • Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse exhibits include how people lived along the coast and harvested the sea for more than 4,000 years.
  • S.S. Ethie shipwreck location can be viewed.
  • Broom Point was a fishing premises from 1941-75. Its interpretive focus for today's visitor is the 1960's fishery and the families who lived there.
  • There is a park visitor guide "Tuckamore" and information available on the website.
     

4u Role of WHS designation in education, information and awareness building activities
The World Heritage Site designation has been used as a promotional tool by the national park and the Provincial Government and as a marketing tool by the tourism industry. The education, information and awareness building programs are developed because of the national park status, however, they also support the communication of World Heritage Site values.
 

To the top

5 FACTORS AFFECTING THE PROPERTY

5a Development Pressures
The following excerpt was taken from the original nomination:
"Historic hunting practices had reduced wildlife populations, but with the protection afforded since 1973 by park conservation policies, all mammal species but the American Marten, considered extirpated from the park, are stabilizing. Seven of the eighteen land mammals occurring in the park are non-native and have significantly influenced the ecological relationship that existed prior to their introduction. As is the case globally, Atlantic salmon populations within the park have decreased in recent years, and there is concern for their future. Arctic and Common Tern nesting sites are in jeopardy and require special management attention. Parks Canada is working with partners to deal with the above noted issues.

Commercial logging within the park area reached its peak in the early years of this century. Evidence of past logging is present in many areas, but the forest is now returning to its natural state: there is some concern regarding the low regeneration rate of the few remaining eastern White Pine." These pressures can be considered historic pressures that affect the general integrity of the park rather than the World Heritage values. Park management, as outlined in 4o and 6 show how these and other pressures are being managed to maintain and increase the integrity of the park.
Commercial forestry harvesting adjacent to Gros Morne could threaten the park's ecological integrity. Parks Canada is working cooperatively with the provincial government, the forestry industry and others to research the effects of harvesting and to explore alternative harvesting strategies. See 6c for further information.
 

5b Environmental Pressures
Not applicable.
 

5c Natural Disasters and Preparedness
Not applicable.
 

5d Visitor/Tourism Pressures
There is no potential problem with visitors. The property can absorb the current or likely number of visitors without adverse effects. Visitor use patterns are monitored, managed and constantly evaluated. For example, visitation to Gros Morne Mountain is being measured along with several environmental indicators. Based on these, a management strategy will soon be formulated to ensure that visitors can continue to enjoy the mountain without harming it.
In 2002, a carying capacity was established for the boat tour at Western Brook Pond.
 

5e Number of inhabitants within property, buffer zone
There are no inhabitants within the property and there is no buffer zone. There are a number of communities with an approximate population of 3,000 adjacent to the World Heritage Site.

Activities that they undertake that may affect the general integrity of the property include:

  1. Domestic Timber Harvest was a provision of the 1983 Federal-Provincial Agreement to establish the park. A Gros Morne Domestic Timber Harvest Planning Team has been established with the goal to: cooperatively develop a management plan for a sustainable domestic timber harvest within Gros Morne National Park, with the purpose to provide for this traditional activity while ensuring that habitat in the park is maintained. To achieve this goal, several objectives were identified: a sustainable harvest that ensures a future supply of timber; maintenance of ecological integrity, particularly habitat for native wildlife species; access to timber; continued cooperation between Parks Canada, the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador and municipalities to develop and maintain a sustainable harvest strategy; and ensure that there are minimum negative visual impacts.
     
  2. Snaring for Snowshoe Hare for residents of adjacent communities was also a provision of the 1983 Federal-Provincial Agreement. This is an introduced species to the island of Newfoundland. It is a sustainable activity, which is regulated under the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador Wildlife Regulations. The activity will be managed under Parks Canada once Gros Morne becomes proclaimed under the Canada National Parks Act (2000). The activity will be monitored and if necessary modified to avoid accidental mortality of the endangered Newfoundland marten.
     
  3. The 1973 and 1983 Federal-Provincial Agreements also made a provision for snowmobiling within the park boundary. Snowmobile Guidelines for Community Use of Gros Morne National Park have been approved by Parks Canada. A Resident Snowmobile Management Board is in place to provide advice to the Field Unit Superintendent on matters pertaining to the management of this activity as per the Guidelines. Parks Canada is currently working with a broad range of interest groups to develop guidelines for commercial and public snowmobiling within the park. Guidelines for all these activities will ensure the ecological integrity of the park is maintained.
     

5f Other
The 1997 State of the Park Report indicated that there were 10 stressors causing significant impacts on the ecological integrity of Gros Morne. They are: commercial fishing, exotic mammals, exotic vegetation, forestry, mining, sport fishing, sport hunting, urbanization, utility corridors and visitor/tourism facilities. To mitigate these stressors, management plans and actions are developed and the park is developing an ecological integrity statement. It will outline indicators for assessing ecological integrity, a statement of the park's ecosystem and desirable state and a strategy for achieving it. Work already in place to do this is outlined in Sections 4o and 6. These stressors do not affect the World Heritage values of the site.
 

To the top

6 MONITORING

ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS FOR MONITORING PROPERTY
6a Formal monitoring program

There is a formal monitoring program established for the site.
Description of formal monitoring program
A four-year rotating cycle has been established in conjunction with the national Ecological Integrity Monitoring Program. Over fifty variables are monitored to evaluate biodiversity, ecosystem function and human caused stressors on the World Heritage Site. This includes both physical and biological parameters and is consistent with the Parks Canada National Monitoring Framework.

Factors being monitored:

Biodiversity:
Species Richness -
Change in species richness
Numbers and extent of exotics
Banding passerine birds
Small mammal survey
Impacts of exotic rainbow trout in the Trout River watershed

Population Dynamics -
Mortality/natality rates of indicator species
Immigration/emigration of indicator species
Population viability of indicator species
Caribou population survey
Monitoring rock ptarmigan numbers on Gros Morne Mountain
Estimating the size of the arctic hare population
Atlantic salmon stock assessment for Trout River
Monitoring juvenile salmon populations
Distribution and abundance of the American pine marten in the
Greater Gros Morne ecosystem

Trophic Structure -
Size class distribution of all taxa
Predation levels

Ecosystem Function:
Succession/retrogression -
Disturbance, frequencies and size (fire, insects, flooding)
Vegetation age class distribution

Productivity -
Landscape or by site

Decomposition -
By site

Nutrient retention -
Ca, N by site

Stressors:
Human land-use patterns -
Land use maps, roads, densities, population densities

Habitat fragmentation -
Patch size inner patch distance for interior
Effect of increased habitat fragmentation on nest predation of
forest nesting birds in the Greater Gros Morne Ecosystem

Pollutants -
Sewage, petrochemicals, etc.
Long range transportation of toxics
Monitoring for the long range transport of airborne pollutants
An analysis of environmental contamination by road salt at two salt storage depots in Gros Morne

Climate -
Weather data
Frequency of extreme events
Monitoring ecological integrity at Gros Morne via changes to park
landforms (Geoindicators)

Other -
Park specific issues
Gros Morne Mountain human use monitoring project
The Long Range Traverse - monitoring of campsite impacts
Status of the mountain fern on the Long Range Highlands

A State of Protected Heritage Areas Report which reports on stressors affecting ecological integrity is carried out every two years.
 

KEY INDICATORS FOR MEASURING STATE OF CONSERVATION
6b Agreed upon key indicators

No key indicators for measuring the state of conservation of the site's World Heritage values have been agreed upon.
Future development of key indicators
There is no current plan to develop indicators specifically for the recognized World Heritage values. Development of the monitoring programs described in 6a will be sufficient.
 

RESULTS OF PREVIOUS REPORTING EXERCISES
6c State Party actions in response to World Heritage Committee recommendations

In 2000, the World Heritage Center received a letter concerning the effects of clearcutting in the Main River watershed, adjacent to the World Heritage Site. The forestry company that had havesting rights in the area began a new planning process the same year. In response to this activity, a "Connectivity Working Group" was formed in January 2001, bringing together stakeholders to develop scientifically-based solutions that ensure Gros Morne National Park remains ecologically connected to its broader landscape. In March 2001, the forestry company announced an end to clear cutting in the Main River Watershed and several months later, in May, the Minister of Canadian Heritage approved the designation of the Main River as a Canadian Heritage River. Parks Canada has informed the World Heritage Centre that it continues to work cooperatively with adjacent land managers in a way that respects constitutionally-defined jurisdictions to ensure the ecologial integrity of the park.
 

To the top

7 CONCLUSIONS

WORLD HERITAGE VALUES
7a Main conclusions regarding the state of the property's World Heritage Values

The park was inscribed on the World Heritage List under criteria N(i) and N(iii). The rocks of Gros Morne National Park illustrate the process of continental drift as it relates to the eastern coast of North America, and contributes to the scientific community's knowledge and understanding of plate tectonics. Its spectacular landscape is an area of exceptional natural beauty. The park has sufficient size and integrity to protect the key features in perpetuity. These World Heritage values are being maintained.
 

MANAGEMENT AND FACTORS AFFECTING SITE
7b Main conclusions regarding the management of and factors affecting the property

Gros Morne National Park is managed using a combination of national and provincial regulations. A park management plan is in place and there are plans to develop a new management plan within the next two to three years. The plan will outline the management of the park in a way that ensures ecological integrity and provide high quality visitor experiences.

There is an active research and monitoring program in place that is used as an early warning system to identify changes in the park's geological and biological components and is critical to the park's adaptive management. Forestry on adjacent lands has been identified as a potential threat to the integrity of the park; however, the park is working with local forestry companies to ensure the ecological integrity of the greater Gros Morne National Park ecosystem.
 

PROPOSED FUTURE ACTION(S)
7c Approved future actions

Parks Canada will continue work to have Gros Morne National Park proclaimed as a national park under the protective legislation of the Canada National Parks Act (2000).

A new park management plan will be developed within the next two to three years, which outlines management strategies that will ensure the ecological integrity of the park.

Annual Business Planning will be used at the field unit level to address: the strategic objectives presented in the field unit's management plans; the national strategic directions of Parks Canada; and any concerns that may arise from periodic evaluations.

The Engaging Canadians Strategy is Parks Canada's strategy for external communications. It is designed to inform, influence and involve stakeholders and the public in the protection and presentation of special places. The strategy will be used by the field unit to assist all levels of the park organization in planning, prioritizing and undertaking activities in the development and delivery of communications targeted to external audiences in support of the agency's mandate.
 

RESPONSIBLE IMPLEMENTING AGENCY(IES)
7d Agency(ies) responsible for implementing actions

Agency Name: Parks Canada
Name: Bird, Chip
Title: Field Unit Superintendent, Newfoundland West & Labrador Field Unit
Address: P.O. Box 130
City: Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland and Labrador
Postal Code: A0K 4N0
Telephone: 709 458-2417
Fax Number: 709 458-2059
Email: chip.bird@pc.gc.ca
 

TIMEFRAME FOR IMPLEMENTATION
7e Timeline for implementation of actions

Gros Morne proclaimed as a national park: Uncertain
New park management plan: Start work 2004/2005
Sustainable Business Planning: Ongoing
Engaging Canadians Strategy: Ongoing
 

NEEDS FOR INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE
7f Anticipated Requests for International Assistance

It is not anticipated that International Assistance, through the World Heritage Fund, will be requested.
 

ACTIONS STATE PARTY INTENDS TO REQUEST FROM WORLD HERITAGE COMMITTEE
7g Potential Decisions for the World Heritage Committee

  • Proposed new Statement of Significance, where previously missing