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Departmental Performance Report 2012-13

The Parks Canada Charter

Our Mandate

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Our Role

We are guardians of the national parks, the national historic sites and the national marine conservation areas of Canada

We are guides to visitors from around the world, opening doors to places of discovery and learning, reflection and recreation.

We are partners, building on the rich traditions of our Aboriginal people, the strength of our diverse cultures and our commitments to the international community.

We are storytellers, recounting the history of our land and our people—the stories of Canada.

Our Commitments

To protect, as a first priority, the natural and cultural heritage of our special places and ensure that they remain healthy and whole.

To present the beauty and significance of our natural world and to chronicle the human determination and ingenuity which have shaped our nation.

To celebrate the legacy of visionary Canadians whose passion and knowledge have inspired the character and values of our country.

To serve Canadians, working together to achieve excellence guided by values of competence, respect and fairness.

Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

Chief Executive Officer’s Message

Section I: Organizational Overview

Section II: Analysis of Programs and Sub-Programs by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Endnotes

Minister’s Message

Minister Leona Aglukkaq

As the Minister responsible for the Parks Canada Agency, I am pleased to present to Canadians this 2012-13 Performance Report. The report describes the Agency’s contributions to important outcomes for Canadians, such as a clean and healthy environment, and a vibrant Canadian culture and heritage.

Most Canadians and visitors to Canada know and appreciate Parks Canada for the many opportunities it provides to experience the places and events that define this country. Having just celebrated its first century of service in 2011, Parks Canada’s places continue to inspire Canadians as well as significantly contribute to the Canadian economy through the stimulation of tourism and resulting employment in communities across the nation.

Major achievements in commemorating and enhancing knowledge of our cultural heritage this past year included the designation of Grand-Pré National Historic Site, in Nova Scotia, as the 16th UNESCO World Heritage Site in Canada, and the designation of Canada’s first heritage lighthouses under the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act. Parks Canada also led the multi-partner expedition in search of the lost Franklin vessels, making tangible progress in the search as well as helping to chart a new corridor to navigate around King William Island. Finally, the Agency played a central role in commemorating the events of the War of 1812.

Parks Canada continued to play a strong role on the world stage, as it led the development of The Ecological Restoration for Protected Areas: Principles, Guidelines, and Best Practices released by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2012.

Progress was made on the expansion of Canada’s network of protected areas over the past year. Key accomplishments were the announcements of Canada’s 44th national park, the Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve in the Northwest Territories, and the expansion of Gulf Islands National Park Reserve in British Columbia. Also significant was the allocation of funding to Canada’s first National Urban Park in the Greater Toronto Area’s Rouge Valley, and the tabling of legislation to formally protect Sable Island under the Canada National Parks Act.

During the last year, Parks Canada continued to build engaging links with our natural and cultural heritage, and to inspire the next generation to connect with our special places and safeguard our land, our stories and our legacy. I encourage everyone to experience, and take inspiration from, Canada’s remarkable heritage.

Original version was signed by

The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Chief Executive Officer’s Message

Chief Executive Officer for Parks Canada, Alan Latourelle

I am pleased to submit this Performance Report, showcasing Parks Canada’s achievements for fiscal year 2012-13. Over the course of the year, Parks Canada team members continued the proud tradition of responsible stewardship of our country’s most special natural and historic places.

Providing opportunities for Canadians to understand and appreciate their rich history is fundamental to the Agency’s mandate. Last year’s commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 was a Government priority and a key focus for Parks Canada. To mark the anniversary, the Agency hosted many successful events, including spectacular re-enactments at national historic sites such as the Halifax Citadel, Signal Hill and Fort George.

Parks Canada also paid tribute to many of the places, events and people that comprise this country’s rich heritage. The Agency commemorated Mile Zero in St. John’s, Newfoundland, where Terry Fox began his Marathon of Hope. Other commemorations celebrated the Calgary Stampede, the Grey Cup and world-renowned pianist Glenn Gould.

We also take pride in our continued actions to address threats to the ecological integrity of Canada’s natural treasures. At Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, for example, efforts to remove invasive species were undertaken in order to preserve the world’s largest breeding population of ancient murrelets. Other examples include the restoration of habitat for the pink verbena, an endangered flower, found in the sand dunes of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and the return of Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic salmon to rivers in Fundy National Park, New Brunswick.

With the support of our innovative partners, we launched a number of initiatives designed to engage larger numbers of Canadians, particularly young Canadians, in our natural and historic places. Edifica, for instance, is a new mobile application that enables users to access fascinating facts about hundreds of Canada’s cherished places. Another mobile application—Learn to Camp—makes it easier to plan and enjoy a camping trip to our special places. We extended two successful youth initiatives: My Parks Pass and the Coolest School Trip contest. The Agency introduced new accommodation options – oTENTiks, which enables visitors to enjoy many of the comforts of home while experiencing the great outdoors.

I am proud of the Parks Canada team’s continued professionalism and unwavering commitment to the important mandate entrusted to us on behalf of Canadians.

Original version was signed by

Alan Latourelle
Chief Executive Officer
Parks Canada Agency

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

The Parks Canada Agency protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrityi of these places for present and future generations. National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas, of which Parks Canada is the proud steward, offer to Canadians the opportunity to live meaningful experiences and to personally connect with these heritage places. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and neighbouring communities.

Mandate

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Vision

Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Responsibilities

Parks Canada is a separate Government of Canada Agency and derives its responsibilities from the following legislation:

  • Parks Canada Agency Act;
  • Canada National Parks Act;
  • Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act;
  • Historic Sites and Monuments Act;
  • Heritage Railway Stations Protection Act;
  • Historic Canal Regulations pursuant to the Department of Transport Act;
  • Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act; and
  • Species at Risk Act.

The Agency’s Chief Executive Officer reports directly to the Minister of the Environment.

Parks Canada manages national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas on behalf of Canadians. Parks Canada is a proud steward of these heritage places and protects and presents them for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations of Canadians.

As the first national park service in the world, Parks Canada has and continues to play a vital role in the development of a system of national parks representative of the diversity of natural regions and landscapes of Canada. Similarly, national marine conservation areas represent Canada’s marine regions spanning its three oceans and the Great Lakes. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to protect ecological integrity. In regards to national marine conservation areas, the Agency works to foster the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources while protecting key features.

Parks Canada strives to ensure the system of national historic sites–comprised of places, persons and events of national historic significance–reflects the country’s rich history. Each national historic site tells its own story and contributes to our understanding of Canada as a whole. The system is developed in collaboration with Canadians to define important aspects of Canada’s history and contributes to the recognition and celebration of significant anniversaries, like the bicentennial of the War of 1812.

Today, national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas offer to Canadians a variety of recreational activities and learning experiences as well as unique opportunities to personally connect with these heritage places. There are more than 20 million person-visits annually to the heritage places administered by Parks Canada.

In addition, some of Parks Canada’s programs are focused on recommending nominations for formal heritage designations by the Government of Canada and, where mandated, providing support for the conservation and presentation of designated properties that are managed by others. These include national historic sites, heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, federal heritage buildings, archaeological sites, the gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, and Canadian heritage rivers. Parks Canada shows leadership in the conservation of built heritage through Parks Canada’s National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program, a contribution program for non-federally-owned national historic sites and through its administration of the Canadian Register of Historic Places, an online, searchable database of historic places designated by all levels of government in Canada.

Parks Canada also contributes to international heritage conservation through its leadership and participation in international conventions, programs, and agreements, notably as State Member for the World Heritage Convention and for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Parks Canada is Canada’s national focal point for the Programme of Work on Protected Areas under the Convention on Biological Diversity and plays a leadership role for the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property.

More information on Parks Canada’s mandate and responsibilities is available on its websiteii.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

Figure for Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

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Note: As illustrated in the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities, Program Alignment Architecture was previously known as the Program Activity Architecture; Programs were previously Program Activities, sub programs were sub activities and sub sub programs were known as sub sub activities. The terminology has been changed throughout this Departmental Performance Report to reflect new nomenclature required by Treasury Board Secretariat.

Organizational Priorities

Priority Typeiii Program
Establishing National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas Ongoing Heritage Places Establishment
Summary of Progress
Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve, Canada’s 44th national park, was established in 2012. In addition, Parks Canada continued to make demonstrable progress toward establishing national parks in four unrepresented terrestrial natural regions through its work on the Qausuittuq (Bathurst Island), Mealy Mountains, Thaidene Nene (East Arm of Great Slave Lake) and Manitoba Lowlands proposals. Parks Canada also made demonstrable progress in establishing national marine conservation areas in three unrepresented marine regions with the Lancaster Sound, Southern Strait of Georgia and les Îles-de-la-Madeleine proposals. Through the establishment of national parks and marine conservation areas, additional opportunities are provided to Canadians to connect with their heritage places.

Priority Type Program
Conserving Canada’s Heritage Places Ongoing Heritage Resources Conservation
Summary of Progress
Parks Canada made significant investments in the fourth year of the Action on the Ground initiative - a broad range of active management and restoration projects aimed at addressing priority ecological integrity issues in national parks, which also provide opportunities for Canadians to connect with their heritage places by learning about or participating in conservation activities. Examples of Action on the Ground projects currently underway include: rehabilitating natural flow in water courses; restoring the role of browsingiv and fire in the boreal forest; reintroducing native species and natural processes in grasslands ecosystems; and recovering species at risk in the Garry Oak ecosystem, all of which contribute to improving ecological integrity.

In addition, ongoing work has led to the improvement of the condition of cultural resources of national significance previously rated as poor. The improvement in condition ratings are largely due to conservation work on building foundations, roofs, windows, and fortification walls of Parks Canada’s built cultural resources.

Priority Type Program
Increasing Visitation Previously committed to Visitor Experience
Summary of Progress
Parks Canada undertook targeted and innovative initiatives to enhance the appeal of Canada’s natural and historic treasures as accessible travel destinations for Canadians to explore and enjoy. These initiatives included special events at national historic sites to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, an extension of the freeze on admission fees, participation at travel trade shows, and continued diversification of overnight accommodations, technology applications, and a new onsite youth experience program. Parks Canada’s efforts helped boost visitation to 20.6 million in 2012-13, a 3 percent increase over 2011-12.

Priority Type Program
Increasing Canadians’ Connection with Parks Canada Places Previously committed to Public Appreciation and Understanding
Summary of Progress
Working with partners and supporters, Parks Canada brought the spirit, wonder, and experiences of Canada’s natural and historic treasures to Canadians through a variety of broadcast projects, urban outreach events, family and youth-oriented contests, and social media applications. Parks Canada’s presence in the day-to-day lives of Canadians helped keep the overall level of support for the Agency’s activities stable in 2012-13.

Priority Type Program
One Team, One Vision, One Voice Ongoing Internal Services
Summary of Progress
In 2012-13, Parks Canada implemented several important change-management initiatives that leveraged the talent and engagement of its team members and its separate employer status to effectively manage a period of Agency change to ensure an integrated and collaborative approach to achieving Agency priorities. Parks Canada also strengthened the performance management program for employees in two ways: first, through the combined assessment of leadership attributes and developmental opportunities to leverage the talent of its team members and second, by placing more emphasis on dialogue between employees and supervisors to maximize team engagement. For Parks Canada, a cornerstone of engagement continues to be through the recognition of its team members’ accomplishments toward the achievement of the Agency Vision, as demonstrated through the prestigious CEO Awards.

Priority Type Program
Asset Management Ongoing Heritage Resources Conservation

Visitor Experience

Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Summary of Progress
As part of its overall asset management strategy, Parks Canada is finalizing a national review of its built asset portfolio, which will result in updated asset data related to inventory, asset condition, current replacement values, and estimates of deferred work. As a result, the Agency will be better positioned to ensure resources are allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.

Risk Analysis

Each year, Parks Canada reviews and updates its Corporate Risk Profile. In 2012-13, the Agency maintained three key corporate risks identified in 2011-12: Competitive Position, Environmental Forces and Asset Management, and added Natural Disasters as its fourth key corporate risk. A summary of these risks and their mitigation measures were included in the Agency’s 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Parks Canada’s efforts at mitigating its key corporate risks are presented in the following table and narrative section.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture Link to Organizational Priorities
Competitive Position
Parks Canada’s programs, services and experience offer may be less attractive, or of less interest to Canadians compared to alternative leisure activities and interests.
The key response to this risk continues to be proactive media relations, event planning, and product enhancement to raise awareness of Canada’s national treasures, nurture interest in them, and inspire Canadians to visit them. As a result of these efforts, visitation increased 3 percent to 20.6 million in 2012-13 (over 2011-12). The Agency was also the recipient of two tourism industry awards. Strategic Outcome

Visitor Experience

Public Appreciation and Understanding
Increasing visitation

Increasing Canadians’ Connection with Parks Canada Places
Environmental Forces
The Agency’s ability to maintain or improve overall ecological integrity in national parks and meet legal requirements related to species at risk may be hindered by environmental forces, such as biodiversity loss, exotic/invasive species, as well as climate change, and shoreline erosion, which also pose a risk to maintaining commemorative integrity in national historic sites.
The key response to this risk continues to be the implementation of the Action on the Ground initiative, which includes projects for the recovery of species at risk.

Shoreline erosion continues to be mitigated through on-going research to find the most effective means of limiting its effect and through such actions as salvage archaeology and implementing Coastal Conservation Plans.
Heritage Resource Conservation Conserving Canada’s Heritage Places
Natural Disasters
Natural disasters may impair or destroy critical infrastructure and/or assets of national historic significance, leading to significant unforeseen expenses and potentially, serious injury or loss of life.
The key response to this risk continues to be to:
  • increase capacity to support the development of emergency and business continuity plans through a stronger national security program;
  • ensure that operational requirements regarding emergency events are attached to leases and licenses with partners, share information on risk and hazards with partners and promote risk reduction in decision-making, particularly in asset investment;
  • allocate resources for inspections of high-risk assets and for highest priority risk areas such as highways and waterways; and
  • implement a new investment planning cycle and process that will facilitate the establishment of investment priorities, the allocation of funds to highest priority projects and the monitoring of capital investments.
Heritage Resources Conservation

Visitor Experience

Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Asset Management
Asset Management
Aging infrastructure and inadequate levels of recapitalization and maintenance, particularly for high risk contemporary assets could result in failure of assets which could compromise public safety, hinder Parks Canada’s ability to deliver on its mandate, and damage the Agency’s reputation.
The Agency is responding to this risk by finalizing a national asset review which will result in updated asset information, enabling the Agency to focus resources on highest priority investment requirements.

Parks Canada also continues to implement a new investment planning cycle and process that will facilitate the establishment of investment priorities, the allocation of funds to highest priority projects and the monitoring of capital investments.

The Agency continues to invest in dam safety reviews on 39 high risk dams. These reviews provide detailed assessments of condition, functionality and recapitalization requirements. This information is necessary to ensure ongoing public safety and compliance with direction from the Canadian Dam Association.
Heritage Resources Conservation

Visitor Experience

Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Asset Management

Competitive Position

Parks Canada is not alone in offering places of natural and historic interest to Canadians. With competing urban attractions and tourism campaigns aimed at luring Canadians away to international locales, the risk is that Parks Canada’s products and service offer becomes less competitive when compared to other natural and historic attractions and/or leisure destinations, resulting in fewer Canadians choosing to visit national heritage places over the long term. Fewer visitors reduces the resources available to Parks Canada to reinvest in programs and services.

In 2012-13, dedicated teams of Parks Canada staff helped mitigate this risk by continuing proactive media relations, event planning and product enhancement. The Agency leveraged the Government of Canada’s commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 with media coverage, onsite events, and urban outreach. It nurtured youth and family-oriented programs introduced during its 100th anniversary (2011-12), continued a freeze on admission fees to stimulate a desire to visit, and continued the implementation of the Agency’s brand in all activities. New technology tools were launched to connect with new markets, the Agency collaborated with media personalities to extend its reach into urban markets, and it participated in key travel trade shows. Parks Canada developed a framework to prioritize efforts consistently with its brand and support competitive positioning, while also continuing to contribute to the Federal Tourism Strategy to enhance the competitive advantage of Canadian tourism destinations.

Proactive activities had positive impacts for Parks Canada in 2012-13. Website traffic increased from the previous year (up 14 percent), as did the Agency’s social media followers (up 228 percent). Visitation to Parks Canada places was also higher (up 3 percent) than it was in 2011-12. These positive trends suggest that the interest in and desire to visit Parks Canada places that was inspired in 2011-12 during its centennial celebrations has been effective in increasing Canadians connection with their treasured places in 2012-13.

Environmental Forces

Parks Canada recognizes that its ability to maintain or improve ecological integrity in national parks and meet legal requirements related to species at risk may be hindered by external environmental forces such as climate change, invasive species and habitat loss or degradation. These environmental forces are the results of various complex processes with significant inter-relationships including globalization, urbanization and industrial development. To mitigate this risk in 2012-13, Parks Canada continued to implement the Action on the Ground initiative, including projects to restore ecological processes and connectivity, to control invasive and hyper-abundant species and to reintroduce species at risk. The Agency also continued site-based action planning for species at risk in 14 protected heritage areas. In July 2012, the Parks Canada Interim Directive on Implementation of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012 was approved to ensure that the Agency focuses its efforts on assessing projects with the greatest risk for significant adverse environmental effects. Parks Canada also continued to participate in environmental assessments for major projects adjacent to protected heritage areas, which may have potential negative impacts.

Shoreline erosion poses a risk to maintaining commemorative integrity. It continues to cause the loss of cultural resources associated with certain national historic sites managed by Parks Canada. Some of the most damaging effects of shoreline erosion are most prominent at national historic sites where in-situ cultural resources are located near active bodies of water, such as the Fortress of Louisbourg (Atlantic Ocean), York Factory (Hayes River), and Navy Island (Niagara River). This has worsened over time due to effects such as melting permafrost and stronger than usual storms. Management responses, such as salvage archaeology and additional research on effective methods to reduce erosion, continue to be the key responses to this risk. For the Fortress of Louisbourg, a Coastal Conservation Plan has also been developed and is being implemented.

Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters continue to increase in both frequency and severity in Canada. Parks Canada has dealt with the impacts of a number of severe weather events in recent years including floods, avalanches, mudslides, ocean surges and major storms. For example in 2012, $5 million was required to repair damage sustained at six national parks in Western Canada including parts of the Trans Canada Highway. These events impose unforeseen expenses on Parks Canada. They can also significantly impact the Agency’s revenue generating capacity as affected roads and facility closures can lead to decreased visitation.

To mitigate the Natural Disasters risk in 2012-13, Parks Canada began to undertake measures to strengthen its security program to further support the development of emergency and business continuity plans. Parks Canada continued to ensure that roles and responsibilities for responding to emergency events were included in licenses and leases with high-risk commercial operators (e.g. ski hills, outfitters), and neighbouring jurisdictions. Parks Canada provided information (i.e. emergency planning information for flood response) to its partners including provincial and law enforcement agencies to ensure a coordinated response in the event of a natural disaster. Parks Canada decommissioned some assets in geographical areas at risk, and conducted hydrological assessments prior to asset investment in flood prone areas. Additionally, Parks Canada dedicated $15.6 million dollars over three years (2012-13 to 2014-15) to complete Dam Safety Reviews of 39 high-risk dams. These reviews assess the impacts that would be associated with the most severe flood that could reasonably be expected to occur at a particular location, which informs the development of corresponding emergency preparedness and response plans.

Asset Management

As one of the largest federal custodians, Parks Canada manages a diverse and widespread portfolio of assets with a current replacement value of more than $15 million. Maintenance and recapitalization challenges, particularly for high risk categories of assets such as dams, bridges and highways, could result in asset closures or significant reductions in levels of service. Parks Canada’s asset management policy framework mitigates these risks by providing operational units with clear direction and guidance that promotes value for money and sound stewardship. In this context, Parks Canada’s focus remains on public safety, compliance with legislated requirements, due diligence practices as well as on the management of reliable information for decision-making and reporting on performance.

As part of its overall asset management strategy, Parks Canada is finalizing a national review of its built asset portfolio which includes the significant portfolios of the Trans-Canada and provincially-number highways and heritage canals. This comprehensive review will result in updated data related to the overall asset inventory including condition ratings, current replacement values, and estimates of deferred work. As a result, the Agency will be better positioned to ensure resources are allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.

Capital investments in dams and water retaining structures continued to be informed in accordance with the Directive for Dam Safety Program of Parks Canada Dams and Water-Retaining Structures. In 2012-13, Parks Canada initiated targeted assessments of 39 high-risk dams, including site inspections, to obtain essential information on dam conditions and safety hazards. As each dam safety review is completed, the newly acquired information is used by the Agency to strategically prioritize any related capital investments to ensure effective management of water levels and public safety.

Parks Canada, in accordance with Treasury Board Policy on Investment Planning – Assets and Acquired Services, initiated an Agency-wide investment planning process to ensure capital investments are directed to address the highest corporate priorities and most significant risks. Once fully implemented, this process will build on the effectiveness and sustainability of Parks Canada’s asset management program by strengthening the Agency’s ability to maintain and improve its built assets in a manner that continues to ensure public safety and promote heritage conservation, visitor enjoyment and socio-economic benefits.

Summary of Performance

Financial Resources – Total Agency ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending)
648,228 651,528 781,701 630,548 20,980

The Agency’s planned spending represents the amount approved by Parliament through the Main Estimates plus approximately $3 million received for Canada’s Fast-Start financing under the Copenhagen Accordv, which was known at the time of publishing the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities. In addition, throughout the year, new and renewed funding added a total of $130.2 million to Planned Spending, increasing the Total Authorities to $781.7 million. The main items contributing to this increase were new funding for the establishment of the Rouge National Urban Park, renewed funding for the Species at Risk program, funds carried over from 2011-12 and additional funding received for the costs of maternity and severance benefits. The Total Authorities also reflect the reduction related to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures. In addition, the Agency is absorbing salary increases as announced in Budget 2010 as well as economic increases related to inflation. The actual spending of $630.5 million is $21 million lower than the planned spending. This is mainly due to the implementation of projects which is explained in more detail under the explanation of significant variances following the Performance Summary Tables.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents-FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
4,511 3,924 587

Parks Canada utilized 3,924 FTEs in 2012-13. The decrease of 587 FTEs or 13 percent over the initial planned estimate of 4,511 FTEs is primarily due to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Performance Summary Table ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places area enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–13) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
1: Heritage Places Establishment 15,751 15,751 47,392 17,475 42,319 14,874 14,168 21,686 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
2: Heritage Resources Conservation 160,995 163,965 172,078 155,839 172,284 146,399 158,761 215,947 A clean and healthy environment
3: Public Appreciation and Understanding 46,151 46,481 39,963 39,030 60,017 52,373 52,880 50,823 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
4: Visitor Experience 239,852 239,852 235,484 236,799 262,766 239,572 262,897 347,803 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
5: Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure 113,933 113,933 132,512 88,212 152,219 91,783 104,365 162,422 A safe and secure Canada
Sub-Total 576,682 579,982 627,429 537,355 689,605 545,001 593,071 798,680

Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)
Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)
Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
Internal Services 71,546 71,546 66,299 59,896 92,096 85,547 84,941 87,036
Sub-Total 71,546 71,546 66,299 59,896 92,096 85,547 84,941 87,036

Total Performance Summary Table ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcome and Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)
Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
648,228 651,528 693,728 597,251 781,701 630,548 678,012 885,716
Total 648,228 651,528 693,728 597,251 781,701 630,548 678,012 885,716

Explanation of Significant Variances between Planned and Actual Spending

Actual spending for Heritage Resources Conservation is $17.6 million lower than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is related to the implementation of projects such as Action on the Ground, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, and a smaller than expected fire season in 2012-13. These funds will continue to be available for use in 2013-14 to invest in these initiatives.

Actual spending for Public Appreciation and Understanding is $5.9 million higher than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is a result of funding carried over from 2011-12, but not reflected in the planned spending figure presented in the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities. These funds have been reinvested in 2012-13 for the Trans-Canada Trail and the events related to the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.

Actual spending for Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure is $22.2 million lower than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is mainly due to work related to the twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway near Banff National Park being completed in 2013-14.

Actual Spending for Internal Services is $14 million higher than 2012-13 planned spending. This is mainly due to funding received throughout the year but not reflected in the planned spending.

Expenditure Profile

The following chart depicts the Agency’s spending trend over a six-year period. For the period from 2010-11 to 2012-13, Actual Spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For the period from 2013-14 to 2015-16, planned spending reflects approved funding to support the Agency’s Strategic Outcome.

Spending Trend

Graph - Spending Trend

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As seen in the graph above, Parks Canada’s actual spending decreased by $207.7 million from 2010-11 to 2011-12, following completion of Canada’s Economic Action Plan.

In 2012-13, the Agency implemented new streamlining and efficiency measures and supported its staff through significant change. As a result, actual spending was $47.5 million less than 2011-12, and these funds were carried forward into 2013-14 for project delivery.

Planned spending in 2013-14 increases by $63.2 million over actual spending in 2012-13. This is primarily a result of the carry forward of unspent funds from 2012-13 as the Agency implemented new streamlining and efficiency measures. In addition, the Agency absorbed salary increases as announced in Budget 2010 as well as economic increases related to inflation.

Planned spending for 2014-15 and 2015-16 reflect the impact of the full reductions attributable to the implementation of new streamlining and efficiency measures and do not include any provision for funds carried forward from previous years.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Parks Canada’s organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II)vi.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets.

Parks Canada Agency ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. Parks Canada Agency contributes to the following FSDS 2010–2013 themes as denoted by the visual identifiers and associated programs below.

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Theme III: Protecting Nature

  • Program 1: Heritage Places Establishment
  • Program 2: Heritage Resources Conservation
  • Program 3: Public Appreciation and Understanding
  • Program 4: Visitor Experience

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 4 Icon - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint Beginning with Government Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government

  • Program: Internal Services

During 2012–13 Parks Canada Agency considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, Agency initiatives were found to have positive environmental effects on the 2010–2013 FSDS goals and targets in Themes III – Protecting Nature and IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. Further information on the results of the SEA(s) is available on the Parks Canada websitevii.

For additional details on Parks Canada Agency’s activities to support sustainable development and the SEA process, please see Section II of the DPR and the Parks Canada website.viii For complete details on the FSDS, please visit Environment Canada’s departmental websiteix.

Section II: Analysis of Programs and Sub-Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The Parks Canada Agency has one Strategic Outcome as identified in the table below. All programs, sub programs and sub sub programs support this one Strategic Outcome.

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places area enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of national parks with maintained or improved overall ecological integrity. Maintain or improve the overall ecological integrity in all national parks from March 2008 to March 2013. Overall ecological integrity in all national parks has been maintained from March 2008 to March 2013.
Overall average of commemorative integrity rating. Improve the overall average commemorative integrity rating from 6.0/10 in March 2008 by March 2013. As of March 2013, the overall average commemorative integrity rating had improved to 7.1/10.
Percentage of Canadians that report a personal connection to Parks Canada administered places. 65% of Canadians report a personal connection to Parks Canada administered places by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.

Performance Indicators, Target Dates and Performance in 2012-13

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature 1. Maintain or improve the overall ecological integrity in all national parks from March 2008 to March 2013x

The Agency assesses ecological integrity by examining indicators that represent the major ecosystems of a park, such as forests, grasslands and tundra. Each indicator is assessed for its ecological condition (good, fair or poor) and the trend in that condition (improving, stable or declining). Collectively, these assessments provide a basis for understanding the overall ecological integrity of a national park.

Overall ecological integrity in all national parks has been maintained from March 2008 to March 2013. The percentage of assessed ecosystems in good or fair condition remains high, 92 percent in 2009 and 91 percent in 2013. The percentage of assessed ecosystems that have stable trends or improving ecological integrity trends also remained virtually the same during that period, 55 percent in 2009 and 57 percent in 2013.

2. Improve the overall average commemorative integrity rating of national historic sites of 6.0/10 in March 2008 by March 2013.

As of March 2013, Parks Canada achieved an overall average commemorative integrity rating of 7.1 out of 10. This rating has remained stable since the 2011-12 reporting year, noting that two sites were newly reported in 2012-13. Scores improved at one national historic site and remained the same for the second site for which re-evaluations were completed in 2012-13, resulting in an overall stable commemorative integrity rating.

Parks Canada has gradually improved and maintained its overall average commemorative integrity rating over the past five years, from 6.4 in 2008-09, to 6.5 in 2009-10, 6.8 in 2010-11, 7.1 in 2011-12, and stabilizing in 2012-13 at 7.1 (based on 134 evaluations). These steady improvements reflect the on-going priority to invest in conservation work at national historic sites where the need is greatest, and in better communicating to Canadians the importance of these sites in the history of Canada.

For more information on the results of the 2012-13 re-evaluations and the five year trend for impairment of commemorative integrity, please visit the Parks Canada Website.xi

3. Sixty-five percent of Canadians report a personal connection to Parks Canada administered places by March 2014.

Through its 2011-12 National Survey of Canadians,xii Parks Canada learned that the percentage of Canadians who have a sense of personal connectionxiii to Canada’s natural and historic places was 59 percent, an increase of four percent over the baseline of 55 percent in 2008-09. Parks Canada is making progress towards its performance target for 2014, when it will next conduct its National Survey of Canadians. Interim progress indicators reveal that overall awareness levels of Parks Canada remained stable in 2012-13, and stable compared to levels achieved in 2011-12 (during the Agency’s centennial). Visitation also increased in 2012-13, a positive change to the downward trend Parks Canada has been experiencing in recent years.

Parks Canada benefitted from working with partners in 2012-13 to bring the Parks Canada experience to Canadians where they live, work and play, to inspire Canadians to visit their natural and historic treasures, and to nurture pride and support for heritage conservation in Canada.

The results suggest that Parks Canada’s presence and actions are helping more Canadians connect with and embrace the value of their national treasures.

Program 1: Heritage Places Establishment

Description

This program includes systems planning, completing feasibility studies, research, consulting with stakeholders and the public, negotiating with other governments and Aboriginal organizations and obtaining Ministerial approval, resulting in established national parks and national marine conservation areas and designated national historic sites of Canada and other heritage places. Canada’s national parks and national marine conservation areas, as well as the persons, places and events of national historic significance to Canada are symbols to the world and are part of the fabric of the nation. Preservation of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and making it available to Canadians for discovery and enjoyment is of key importance. Establishing heritage places is essential to enhancing pride, encouraging stewardship and giving expression to our identity as Canadians, and involving Canada in the internationally shared objective of protecting and commemorating the best of the world’s natural and cultural heritage.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
15,751 15,751 42,319 14,874 877

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents-FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
77 65 12

Performance Results
Expected Result
Represented regions in the systems of national parks and national marine conservation areas; the system of national historic sites represents the breadth and diversity of Canada’s history.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Number of represented terrestrial natural regions in the system of national parks. Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2007 to 29 of 39 by March 2013. 28
Percentage of yearly commemorations for under-represented themes in Canada’s history. 33% of yearly commemorations are for under-represented themes in Canada’s history. 43%
Number of represented marine regions in the system of national marine conservation areas. Increase the number of represented marine regions from 3 in October 2007 to 5 of 29 by March 2013. 5

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Programming in this area contributes to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 2010–2013
FSDS Goal FSDS Performance Indicator FSDS Target FSDS Performance Status
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection.

Maintain productive and resilient ecosystems with the capacity to recover and adapt; and protect areas in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Percentage of ecosystems where the majority of ecosystem components are assessed as healthy. Target 6.2: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat

Park Protected Habitat.

Maintain or improve the overall ecological integrity in all national parks from March 2008 to March 2013.
Established Naats’ihch’oh National Park Reserve (NWT).

Tabled Bill S 15 in the Senate to formally protect Sable Island National Park Reserve (Nova Scotia) under the Canada National Parks Act.

Made demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in four unrepresented terrestrial natural regions: East Coast Boreal (Mealy Mountains proposal), Western High Arctic (Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island proposal), Northwestern Boreal Uplands (Thaidene Nene in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake proposal), and Manitoba Lowlands (Manitoba Lowlands proposal).

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Increasing the representation of terrestrial natural and marine regions

The national parks system currently consists of 44 parks representing 28 of the 39 terrestrial natural regions. One national park was created in 2012-13, Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve in the Northwest Territories. Parks Canada worked towards increasing the number of represented terrestrial natural regions to 29 by furthering the Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island and Mealy Mountains proposals, which are currently in the negotiation phase. Once final establishment agreements are signed, 30 of 39 regions will be represented.

The national marine conservation area system currently consists of four operational marine areas representing five of the 29 marine regions. With the establishment of the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site in June 2010, Parks Canada met its target of increasing the number of represented marine natural regions from three to five by March 2013, as Gwaii Haanas represents both the Hecate Strait and the Queen Charlotte Shelf marine regions in the Pacific Ocean region.

Commemoration of under-represented themes in Canada’s history

Of the 27 commemorations of persons, places and events of national significance that took place in 2012-13, 12 were related to under-represented themes in Canada’s history, accounting for 43 percent of the total number of commemorations and exceeding the target of 33 percent. For more details on commemorations, please visit the Parks Canada website.xiv

By exceeding its target, Parks Canada continues to ensure the system of national historic sites reflects Canada’s rich history. Heritage designations are proposed by Canadians, are relevant to Canadians, and help to foster a strong sense of connection in their hearts and minds, helping to ensure that these places are protected in ways that allow present and future generations to enjoy them.

Variances in P1 - Heritage Places Establishment

Variances in FTEs are primarily due to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Sub Program - National Park Establishment and Expansion

Description

This program involves the completion of the national parks system in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. Canada is divided into 39 distinct natural regions based on unique physiographic and vegetative characteristics and Parks Canada’s goal is to have at least one national park representative of each natural region. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of Canada’s natural diversity, and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience understand and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9,459 8,932 527

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
29 22 7
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.

Performance Results
Expected Result
National parks are created in unrepresented regions and some existing national parks are completed or expanded.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national parks. Make demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in 3 unrepresented regions each year. 4
Number of national parks expanded. Expand 1 national park by March 2013. 1
Number of unfinished national parks with increased targeted land holdings. Increase the targeted land holdings in 3 unfinished national parks within available resources. 1

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In addition to the establishment of Naats’ihch’oh National Park Reserve (Northwest Territories) and the tabling in the Senate of Bill S15 to formally protect Sable Island National Park Reserve (Nova Scotia) under the Canada National Parks Act, Parks Canada made demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in four unrepresented natural regions: East Coast Boreal in Newfoundland and Labrador (Mealy Mountains proposal), Western High Arctic in Nunavut (Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island proposal), Northwestern Boreal Uplands in the Northwest Territories (Thaidene Nene in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake proposal) and Manitoba Lowlands in Manitoba (Manitoba Lowlands proposal). Details on the progress made on these proposals, as well as other current proposals can be found on the Parks Canada website.xv

Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve adjoins Nahanni National Park Reserve (which was significantly expanded in 2009) and together, the Nahanni and Nááts’ihch’oh national park reserves protect about 86 percent of the entire South Nahanni watershed. The creation of Nááts’ihch’oh effectively completes the Nahanni expansion project.

Gulf Islands National Park Reserve saw its land base increase in 2012, with the acquisition of over 100 hectares of new protected lands on Pender, Saturna and Prevost islands.

Parks Canada’s continued progress on park establishment can be attributed to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with local residents and groups that have the strongest interest and involvement in its work. The establishment of national parks also requires building trust through a high level of engagement on the part of provincial governments and Aboriginal peoples.

Sub Program - National Historic Site Designations

Description

This program involves the implementation of The National Historic Sites of Canada System Plan. Designations under the National Historic Sites System Plan safeguard and chronicle the determination and ingenuity of Canadians and the contributions they have made. The long-term strategy is to enhance the commemoration of places, persons, and events of national historic significance. Implementation of the plan involves Parks Canada, the public, who make most of the nominations for designation, the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which reviews all submissions and recommends the designation of places, persons and events, and the Minister of the Environment, who makes the final designations. The System of National Historic Sites respects the significance and irreplaceable historical legacy reflecting Canada’s values and identity.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
3,227 3,048 179

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
44 33 11
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.

Performance Results
Expected Result
Places, persons and events designated are commemorated and communicated to Canadians.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Results
Research reports are submitted for the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada’s consideration for each eligible place, person and event nominated by the public. One research report is submitted for the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada’s consideration for each eligible place, person and event nominated by the public. 27 research reports were submitted in support of new nominations.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Every year, new subjects of potential national historic significance are nominated for consideration, and research reports for those subjects that meet the basic criteria are prepared for consideration by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC)xvi.

In 2012-13, Parks Canada met its target by submitting 27 research reports to the HSMBC in support of nominations for places, persons and events of national historic significance.

The nomination of the Grey Cup reflects Parks Canada’s ability to align commemorations with key anniversaries. The commemoration of the Grey Cup in time for its 100th anniversary demonstrates that Parks Canada remains nimble and responsive to the commemoration and communication of places, persons and events of national historic significance, while providing increased opportunities for Canadians to enjoy their rich history.

Parks Canada continues to attribute much of its success in this area to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with the many Canadians engaged in the nomination process, as well as to the rigour and effectiveness of its evaluation process. In fostering public participation and the integrity of the evaluation process, Parks Canada continues to meet its expected result of having designated places, persons, and events commemorated and communicated to Canadians.

Sub Program - National Marine Conservation Area Establishment

Description

This program involves the expansion and ultimate completion of the national marine conservation areas system in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan entitled Sea to Sea to Sea. Canada is divided into 29 distinct marine regions based on unique oceanographic and biological characteristics and Parks Canada’s goal is to protect and conserve a representative example of each of the 29 regions. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of the diversity of Canada’s oceans and Great Lakes and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience, understand, and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and, consultations; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1,685 1,591 94

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
1 6 (5)

Performance Results
Expected Result
National marine conservation areas are created in unrepresented regions.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Results
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national marine conservation areas. Make demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas in 2 unrepresented regions (yearly). 3

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada exceeded its goal of making demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas by making important progress in three unrepresented marine regions: Lancaster Sound in Nunavut (Lancaster Sound proposal); Strait of Georgia in British Columbia (Southern Strait of Georgia proposal); and Magdalen Shallows in Quebec (les Îles-de-la-Madeleine proposal). Further details on progress in establishing national marine conservation areas in unrepresented regions can be found on the Parks Canada website.xvii

Underlying Parks Canada’s ability to make progress towards the establishment of new national marine conservation areas is the fact that other governments and Aboriginal organizations have also embraced the need to contribute to the conservation of Canada’s marine heritage. In September 2011, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers approved in principle a National Framework for Canada’s Network of Marine Protected Areas that provides direction for the design of the national network of marine protected areas. The establishment of new national marine conservation areas will assist a range of governments in delivering on this national framework.

As with national park establishment, much of Parks Canada’s success with national marine conservation area establishment can be attributed to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with local residents and groups that have the strongest interest and involvement in its work.

Sub Program - Other Heritage Places Designations

Description

This sub program involves commemorating or designating federal heritage buildings, Canadian Heritage Rivers and heritage railway stations. Parks Canada is the lead federal agency for the implementation of the World Heritage Convention in Canada, and plays a role in other international programs such as UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere program. World Heritage Sites represent natural and cultural heritage of outstanding universal value and Biosphere Reserves put into practice principles of sustainable development and serve as sound examples in conservation and education. Parks Canada works with other government departments, other levels of government and a wide range of partners to increase the number of these designations in Canada.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1,380 1,303 77

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
3 4 (1)

Performance Results
Expected Result
Heritage places not administered by Parks Canada are identified.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Average number of federal buildings evaluated to identify buildings with historic value. On average over 3 years, evaluate 400 federal buildings per year to identify buildings that have an historic value. On average over the past 3 years, 413 federal buildings per year were evaluated for historic value.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada exceeded its three year target of 400 by evaluating 413 federal buildings, on average, over the past three years through the work of Parks Canada’s Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office (FHBRO).

The main focus of this program is the work of the FHBRO. Under the Treasury Board Policy on Management of Real Property, departments must ensure that buildings 40 years of age or older are submitted to Parks Canada’s Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office for evaluation to determine their heritage character. Also, under the Parks Canada Agency Act, it is in the national interest that Parks Canada protects the heritage character of federal heritage buildings. The FHBRO meets this mandate by managing the evaluation of federal buildings, advising on the heritage conservation of federal heritage buildings and guiding custodians on requirements for disposing of federal heritage buildings.

The number of evaluations completed by FHBRO on federally-owned buildings which turn 40 years of age is declining on an annual basis. This is the result of a decline in new construction.

Program 2: Heritage Resources Conservation

Description

This program includes maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity in national parks through protection of natural resources and natural processes; ensuring the commemorative integrity of national historic sites managed by Parks Canada and influencing the commemorative integrity of those managed or owned by third parties; the protection and management of cultural resources under the administration of Parks Canada; and the sustainable use of national marine conservation areas including protection of unique marine ecosystems. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The protection of Canada’s most special natural and cultural resources ensures that current and future generations will enjoy a system of protected heritage areas.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
160,995 163,965 172,284 146,399 17,566

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
1,180 951 229

Performance Results
Expected Result
Management actions result in improvements to ecological integrity indicators in national parks, and the state of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) in national historic sites is improved.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Number of national parks with one improved ecological integrity indicator. 20 national parks improve one ecological integrity indicator by March 2015. To be reported in 2015.
Percentage of national historic sites where the condition of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) are rated as poor that are improved. 70% of the national historic sites where the condition of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) rated as poor are improved within 5 years of original assessment. 100%

(2 of 2 sites with poor condition ratings in 2007-08 were improved).

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Programming in this area contributes to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 2010–2013
FSDS Goal FSDS Performance Indicator FSDS Target FSDS Performance Status
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection.

Maintain productive and resilient ecosystems with the capacity to recover and adapt; and protect areas in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Percentage of ecosystems where the majority of ecosystem components are assessed as healthy. Target 6.2: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat

Park Protected Habitat.

Maintain or improve the overall ecological integrity in all national parks from March 2008 to March 2013.
Overall ecological integrity in all national parks has been maintained from March 2008 to March 2013. The percentage of assessed ecosystems in good or fair condition remains high, 92% in 2009 and 91% in 2013. The percentage of assessed ecosystems that have stable trends or improving ecological integrity trends also remained virtually the same during that period, 55% in 2009 and 57% in 2013. For more information, please visit Environment Canada’s websitexviii.

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Improving ecological integrity

In 2012-13, through its Action on the Ground initiative, Parks Canada continued to invest significantly in active management and ecological restoration efforts to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted southern national parks. Monitoring continued to be a priority for the Agency for reporting on the health of parks and for science-based decision making with regards to improving ecological integrity. Examples of issues being addressed through Action on the Ground include: rehabilitation of freshwater lakes in La Mauricie National Park; control of hyper-abundant moose and restoration of black spruce forest in Terra Nova National Park; reintroduction of Blanding’s turtles in Kejimkujik and of bison and black-footed ferrets in Grasslands national parks; control of invasive species in Gulf Islands National Park Reserve; and restoration of the balance of a wolf-elk food web in Riding Mountain National Park.

Improving condition of cultural resources of national significance

Parks Canada has conducted a site-level re-assessment of the three elements of commemorative integrity at national historic sites that had received a poor rating in 2007. The performance indicator and target for this program is concerned with the resource condition element of the re-evaluations.

By 2012-13, focussed heritage conservation work on buildings and structures under threat improved the 2007-08 condition rating for both Grosse-Île and the Irish Memorial and Fort McNab (100 percent). For more details, please visit the Parks Canada website.xix

Since 2007, when the reassessment of sites with poor ratings in commemorative integrity elements began, 67 percent (10 of 15) of the sites that had a poor rating for the Condition of Cultural Resources element have improved that rating.

Supplemental and focussed funding (e.g. Canada’s Economic Action Plan) made a significant difference in Parks Canada’s ability to improve the overall condition of the cultural resources under its responsibility.

Variances in P2 - Heritage Resources Conservation

Variances in FTEs are primarily due to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Actual spending for Heritage Resources Conservation is $17.6 million lower than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is related to the implementation of projects such as Action on the Ground, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, and a smaller than expected fire season in 2012-13. These funds will continue to be available for use in 2013-14 to invest in these initiatives.

Sub Program - National Parks Conservation

Description

Parks Canada has responsibilities under the Canada National Parks Act to protect and conserve nationally significant representative natural areas on behalf of the people of Canada for their benefit, education and enjoyment and to ensure national parks are maintained and made use of as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. National Parks Conservation includes maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity through: ecological research and monitoring to gain a better understanding of the state of health, natural ecological processes and biodiversity of parks; and the impact of stressors on ecosystems. Protection and conservation occurs through scientific research, planning, reporting, public consultation, negotiation with stakeholders and others to influence actions that occur on lands located adjacent to protected heritage areas, cooperative management agreements, adaptive management and restoration of ecosystem processes and biodiversity. Protection and conservation also occurs through specific activities such as prevention, law enforcement, and fire management. This program also includes activities to manage cultural resources in parks and townsites, and environmental management to reduce the environmental impact of operations, townsites and highways.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
99,662 88,985 10,677

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
747 634 113

Performance Results
Expected Result
Ecosystem conservation is improved through active management and the condition of priority heritage buildings administered by Parks Canada in townsites is maintained or improved.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of active management targets to improve ecological integrity that are met. 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015. 23% of active management targets have been met.
Percentage of townsite priority heritage buildings conservation targets that are met. 100% of townsite priority heritage buildings conservation targets are met. 83%

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Natural Resource Conservation

In 2012-2013, through the Action on the Ground initiative, Parks Canada continued to implement active management and restoration projects to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted southern national parks. For details, please visit the Parks Canada website.xx

Improvements in ecological integrity may be realized in one of three ways by: improving the condition of the indicator (e.g. fair to good); improving the trend of the indicator (e.g. declining to stable); or by meeting active management targets (e.g. ratio of native grasses to exotic grasses improved by 15 percent in the restoration area). Though Parks Canada’s long term goals revolve around the status and trend of indicators, the success of an intervention is assessed by the achievement of these active management targets. To date, 23 of 99 targets have been met. For the other 76 targets, steady progress is being made towards completion.

Parks Canada continued to reintroduce fire as a necessary process in support of the maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity, with 13 prescribed burns carried out in 8 national parks. In addition, the Agency coordinated suppression efforts for 87 wildfires affecting 21 national parks to ensure public safety and to protect infrastructure in and around national parks.

In 2012-2013, the Agency completed recovery documents for 10 species at risk and posted them on the Species at Risk Public Registry. Parks Canada has completed 93 percent of the 76 recovery documents for which it is responsible. Parks Canada is now turning to a new phase of the Species at Risk Act implementation, focusing on action planning and the implementation of recovery actions. Since 2011-2012, Parks Canada has initiated site-based action plans for 14 protected heritage areas.

Townsite Priority Heritage Buildings

The townsite heritage buildings conservation target was established in 2006 for 52 priority heritage buildings owned by Parks Canada within seven townsite communitiesxxi. At that time, 48 percent of townsite heritage buildings were in good or fair condition, 19 percent were in poor condition, and 33 percent were unrated. Since 2006, the Agency has undertaken significant improvements and condition assessments on a majority of these heritage assets. By 2012, 83 percent were in good or fair condition, 15 percent were in poor condition and 2 percent remained unrated. Investment in the 8 heritage buildings in poor condition and the remaining condition assessments will remain an Agency priority to ensure the condition of priority heritage buildings administered by Parks Canada in townsites is maintained or improved.

Sub Program - National Marine Conservation Areas Sustainability

Description

Parks Canada has responsibilities under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act to protect and conserve representative marine areas for the benefit, education and enjoyment of the people of Canada and the world. These areas are to be managed and used in an ecologically sustainable manner that meets the needs of present and future generations without compromising the structure and function of the ecosystems with which they are associated. The management of marine conservation areas involves agencies other than Parks Canada that have legislated mandates respecting activities such as fishing and marine navigation, activities that will continue subject to shared understandings that respect the principle of ecologically sustainable use. National Marine Area Sustainability includes ecological research and monitoring to gain a better understanding of the state of health, natural ecological processes and biodiversity of national marine conservation areas. These areas are managed through scientific research, planning, reporting, public consultation, negotiation with other involved management agencies, stakeholders and others to influence actions that occur in areas adjacent to protected heritage areas, cooperative management agreements, adaptive management and restoration of ecosystem processes and biodiversity. Conservation also is achieved through specific activities such as public education, compliance, and law enforcement.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
2,430 2,170 260

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
11 12 (1)

Performance Results
Expected Result
TBD
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
TBD TBD n/a

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, progress was made on the development of a policy framework to inform the management of national marine conservation areas. This framework will include guidance with regards to: ecologically sustainable use; monitoring and reporting; and zoning. Once this framework is in place, it will help to inform expected results and performance expectations for this program.

Sub Program - National Historic Sites Conservation

Description

This program reflects Parks Canada’s mandate to ensure the commemorative integrity of national historic sites on Parks Canada lands. It includes the inventorying and evaluation of resources to determine cultural and historic value; the consideration of historic value in actions affecting cultural resources; and the monitoring and review of ongoing activities. Key activities reflect the management regime for national historic sites: preparation of commemorative integrity statements, evaluations of the state of commemorative integrity, management planning, and conservation actions to improve the condition of cultural resources, the effectiveness of communications, and practices which support good cultural resource management.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
55,842 49,859 5,983

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
394 283 111

Performance Results
Expected Result
The condition of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) administered by Parks Canada is maintained or improved.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of historic objects of national significance (level 1) are maintained in good or fair condition. 90% of historic objects of national significance (level 1) are maintained in good or fair condition by March 2013. 87.5%
Percentage of national historic sites where the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance (level 1) that are in poor condition are improved. 60% of national historic sites where the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance (level 1) that are in poor condition are improved within 5 years of original assessment. 64%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of March 31, 2013, 87.5 percent of historical objects of national significance, where the condition is known, have been maintained in good or fair condition. Parks Canada’s continuing efforts to evaluate the heritage value of historical objects within its collection will improve data to support this target.

By March 31, 2013, Parks Canada surpassed its target with nine of 14 (64 percent) national historic sites having improved the poor condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance, within five years of the original assessment. This result represents cumulative data for all sites which received a poor rating for the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance through a commemorative integrity evaluation.

Parks Canada is working to improve its ability to systematically assess and consistently report on the condition of cultural resources of national significance in a more streamlined and sustainable manner.

Sub Program - Other Heritage Places Conservation

Description

This program involves providing advice and recommendations on appropriate conservation measures to owners/operators of national historic sites not administered by Parks Canada and for other protected heritage areas (Federal Heritage Buildings, Heritage Railway Stations, Gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, Canadian Heritage Rivers). Parks Canada lends its protection expertise and contributes to ensuring that global heritage and biodiversity are protected and Canada’s significant examples of national or international natural and cultural heritage are safeguarded for current and future generations. Parks Canada’s involvement in World Heritage and the Man and Biosphere program are governed by international conventions to which Canada is a signatory.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
6,031 5,385 646

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
28 22 6

Performance Results
Expected Result
Parks Canada programs support the conservation of cultural resources at historic places administered by others.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Percentage of Parks Canada advice that promotes the conservation of significant cultural resources at historic places administered by others and is targeted to areas most in need. 100% of Parks Canada’s advice promotes the conservation of significant cultural resources at historic places administered by others and is targeted to areas most in need. 100%

Sub Sub Program - National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing

Description

Parks Canada has directly engaged Canadians in helping to preserve non-federally administered national historic sites by contributing funds toward conservation and presentation projects on a cost-shared basis to a maximum of one million dollars. Parks Canada supports a limited number of cost-share agreements to assist with modest conservation projects for emergency stabilization or repairs, at sites experiencing growing threat or impairment. Eligible recipients are non-profit organizations, Aboriginal organizations, and provinces, territories and municipalities. Individuals and for-profit corporations are ineligible.

Performance Results
Expected Result
Funded cost-share projects in the conservation of national historic sites not owned by the government.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Percentage of cost-sharing agreements that contribute to the conservation of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) within national historic sites administered by others. 100% of cost-sharing agreements contribute to the conservation of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) within national historic sites administered by others. 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada focuses its efforts to help other administrators of historic places through its cost-sharing program where it provides funds and advice to promote conservation of cultural resources of national significance.

In 2012-13, Parks Canada’s National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program entered into contribution agreements with fourteen National Historic Sites of Canada in order to contribute to the conservation of these important Canadian cultural resources. All of the agreements (100 percent) were completed successfully. These projects were selected from all applicants based in part on the level of threat to the nationally significant resources and all work under the agreements was carried out in accordance with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada (Printable Document, PDF, 5.1 Mb), thus ensuring the commemorative integrity of the sites.

Lessons learned include more timely notification to successful applicants to enable work to be completed within the one year funding timeframe. More information is available in the Evaluation of Parks Canada’s Cost-Sharing Program completed in 2012-13.

Program 3: Public Appreciation and Understanding

Description

This program aims to increase Canadians’ understanding, appreciation, support and engagement with respect to the natural and historical heritage of Parks Canada administered places. This is accomplished by reaching Canadians at home, at leisure, at school and in their communities through relevant and effective communication and public outreach education initiatives as well as by engaging many stakeholders and partners in the development and implementation of the Agency’s future direction.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
46,151 46,481 60,017 52,373 (5,892)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
414 349 65

Performance Results
Expected Result
Canadians appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada and support their protection and presentation.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of Canadians that appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada. 60% of Canadians appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.
Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada. 80% of Canadians support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada has maintained relatively stable levels of support (68 percent in 2011-12; 67 percent in 2008-09 - baseline) and appreciation (51 percent in 2011-12; 53 percent in 2008-09 – baseline) over a three-year period based on the National Survey of Canadians.xxiv This stability is considered an accomplishment, particularly when many things compete for the time and attention of Canadians. The next survey is planned for 2014.

Connecting with Canadians in their communities by facilitating opportunities for them to learn about and be inspired by their natural and historical heritage is important for fostering appreciation and support of Canada’s heritage places. Parks Canada’s success at fostering appreciation and support is shared with dedicated partners and stakeholders.

In 2012-13, Parks Canada built on the success of its centennial year’s activities to create initial connections and increase support among Canadians for what the Agency does on their behalf. Parks Canada leveraged the Government of Canada’s commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 to proactively target urban audiences with outreach and media initiatives.

Parks Canada recognizes that it is the cumulative, long-term impact of its public presence and public interactions that are critical to helping the Agency reach its objectives. Moving forward, a constant, proactive, and consistent approach that reflects Parks Canada’s brand continues to be viewed as being critical to nurturing initial connections with Canadians, building awareness, and providing opportunities for public involvement.

Variances in P3 - Public Appreciation and Understanding

Variances in FTEs are primarily due to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Actual spending for Public Appreciation and Understanding is $5.9 million higher than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is a result of funding carried over from 2011-12, but not reflected in the planned spending figure presented in the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities. These funds have been reinvested in 2012-13 for the Trans-Canada Trail and the events related to the War of 1812.

Sub Program - Public Outreach Education and External Communications

Description

Public outreach education and external communications focuses on facilitating opportunities for Canadians to understand and learn the natural and historical heritage of Parks Canada’s administered places. These opportunities are provided through targeted initiatives, responsive and relevant to audiences’ needs and interests informed by social science research. Public and media relations form the cornerstone of the external communications activities, maximising positive coverage in news and mass media, and mobilising public opinion for Parks Canada’s mandate and activities. Public outreach education mobilises a diversity of learning contexts available to Canadians in their homes, schools and communities, and results in initiatives such as: exhibits featuring Parks Canada places in urban museums, zoos and aquariums; curriculum resources for schools or adult education; learning opportunities on the Web, in print media, through television, films and new media. The reach and relevance of these initiatives are enhanced through collaborations with audiences, stakeholders and partners.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
33,685 37,955 (4,270)
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
294 252 42

Performance Results
Expected Result
Canadians learn about the heritage of Parks Canada’s administered places and understand that these places are protected and presented on their behalf.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased percentage of Canadians that consider that they learned about the heritage of Parks Canada’s administered places. Increase the percentage of Canadians that consider that they learned about the heritage of Parks Canada’s administered places by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.
Increased percentage of Canadians that understand that nationally significant places that are administered by Parks Canada are protected and presented on their behalf. Increase the percentage of Canadians that understand that nationally significant places that are administered by Parks Canada are protected and presented on their behalf by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada established baselines for its performance targets through the 2011-12 National Survey of Canadians.xxv The survey revealed that 42 percent of Canadians consider they learned about the heritage of Parks Canada’s administered places, and that 90 percent understand that these places are protected and presented on their behalf. The Agency is continuing its efforts to increase these percentages by 2014.

Bringing Parks Canada to where Canadians live, work, and play and facilitating opportunities for them to learn about and be inspired by their natural and historical heritage is important for fostering an understanding of why these places are protected and presented on behalf of Canadians. In 2012-13, Parks Canada undertook a number of proactive and targeted outreach and media initiatives, such as:

  • participation in prominent urban festivals, including Canada Day (Ottawa, ON), Winterlude (Ottawa, ON) and Nuit Blanche (Montréal, QC);
  • launching a second annual “Canada’s Coolest School Trip Contest” in collaboration with Canadian Geographic Education, Nature Canada, Historica-Dominion Institute, and Air Canada; and
  • working together with Bienenstock Natural Playgrounds, Toronto Community Housing, ParticipACTION, and Coca-Cola to rejuvenate a downtown Toronto community park.

Parks Canada also reached Canadians through:

  • extensive coverage in English and French newspapers, news broadcasts, radio stations, and magazines;
  • a new archaeology-based Twitter feed (@PCArchaeology) designed to help Canadians connect with the work of the Agency’s underwater and terrestrial archaeology teams; and,
  • an issue of Canadian Geographic featuring Nahanni National Park Reserve.

Parks Canada has learned that inspiring Canadians to learn about heritage places requires a proactive approach involving a diverse mix of platforms, content, venues, and partners, in order to reach Canadians in ways that are meaningful to them.

Sub Program - Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

Description

The support and involvement of Parks Canada’s stakeholders and partners is essential to Parks Canada’s program delivery and continued relevance. Parks Canada’s stakeholders represent all sectors of Canadian society, and include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in the Agency’s actions and direction. Stakeholder engagement activities ensure that Canadians’ needs and priorities are clearly expressed to the Agency and that these interests inform and influence Parks Canada’s actions and direction. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities at all levels of the organization and in ways that are relevant to them, such as the Minister’s Round Table on Parks Canada; formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Parks Canada also has partnering arrangements with a broad range of organizations to further shared goals and objectives. Partners in the not-for-profit sector include other government departments, NGOs, various academic institutions as well as cooperating associations (also known as “Friends of” organizations). Parks Canada also has some strategic partners in the for-profit sector. Stakeholder and partner engagement supports results in all programs and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
12,796 14,418 (1,622)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
120 97 23

Performance Results
Expected Result
Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada’s administered places.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased percentage of stakeholders and partners that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada’s administered places. Increase the percentage of stakeholders and partners that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada’s administered places by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.
Increased percentage of stakeholders and partners that feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada’s activities. Increase the percentage of stakeholders and partners that feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada’s activities by March 2014. To be reported in 2014.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada established baselines for its performance targets through the 2009-10 Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Surveyxxvi. The survey revealed that 82 percent of stakeholders and partners support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada’s administered places, and that 41 percent feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada’s activities. The Agency is continuing its efforts to increase these percentages by 2014.

To reach and engage Canadians in the discovery, appreciation and support for Canada’s natural and historic places, Parks Canada realizes that it needs to work closely with partners. To extend and maximize its reach in 2012-13, Parks Canada collaborated with a diverse mix of partners on initiatives based on mutual and complimentary objectives to bring the stories, wonder and experiences of Parks Canada’s places to Canadians in a multitude of exciting ways.

Parks Canada has learned that there is substantial value and benefit in integrating Parks Canada content into and leveraging the programs and platforms of others. This lesson has fostered new and exciting opportunities.

Program 4: Visitor Experience

Description

This program supports the opportunities provided for more than 20 million person visits that are made annually to Canada’s national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience is the sum total of a visitor’s personal interaction with the protected heritage place that helps them create meaning and establish connection with the place. The experience begins with awareness of the site, followed by planning the visit, travelling to and welcoming and orientation upon arrival. During the visitor’s time on site, it includes participation in recreational and interpretive activities and the use of accommodation, trails, facilities, services and supporting infrastructure. This is followed by departure and the post-visit relationship. Investments in the different stages of the visitor experience cycle facilitate opportunities for enjoyment and learning, leading to a sense of personal connection and the continued relevance of Canada’s protected heritage places for Canadians.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
239,852 239,852 262,766 239,572 280

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
2,085 1,812 273

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of personal connection to the places visited.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Source: Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Programxxix in 2012-13.
Average percentage of visitors that consider the place is meaningfulxxvii to them. On average, 85% of visitors at all surveyed locations consider the place meaningful to them. 85%
Average percentage of visitors that are satisfiedxxviii with their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed locations are satisfied with their visit. 95%
Average percentage of visitors that are very satisfied with their visit. On average, 50% of visitors are very satisfied with their visit. 68%

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 3 Icon - Protecting Nature Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada met or exceeded its performance targets related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed locations who considered the place they visited meaningful to them, and who were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit.xxx

The Agency used the lessons learned from the success of its centennial celebrations in 2011-12 and applied them to its 2012-13 operations. The Agency worked to have promotion occur earlier in the year and in a more consistent format to inspire Canadians to consider Canada’s natural and historic places as destinations of choice when planning holidays. Trip planning publications were updated to reflect new engagement opportunities, and to highlight activities offered for youth and families. Parks Canada hosted special events at places across the country, introduced new activities, and continued activities and programs to enhance visitor experience, and to facilitate the creation of personal connection with Parks Canada places. Of note, Parks Canada was recognized with the 2012 International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA) Canada’s Leadership Award.

The awe of the natural environment, the significance engrained in the fabric of the place, the opportunities to indulge interests, pride in Canada’s conservation efforts, family traditions, and the desire to recapture past memories are among the many reasons and/or experiences that leave enduring impressions of Canada’s natural and historic treasures in the hearts and minds of Canadians. Parks Canada must appeal to a wide range of interests, needs, and expectations resulting in meaningful and satisfying experiences.

Variances in P4 - Visitor Experience

Variances in FTEs are primarily due to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Sub Program - Market Research and Promotion

Description

This program aims at improving the knowledge and understanding of visitor and potential visitor needs and expectations through social science research to improve the quality, timeliness and effectiveness of decision-making about Parks Canada’s service and product offer. This includes monitoring and conducting research on the changing social landscape, to understand and respond to emerging and evolving trends in tourism, recreation, leisure and society and to understand Canadian attitudes toward, and knowledge of, protected heritage areas. Also included are domestic and international tourism promotion activities conducted to inform and attract visitors through targeted communications and through industry relationship building.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
22,256 22,230 26

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
176 142 34

Performance Results
Expected Result
Canadians visit Parks Canada administered places.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Source: Parks Canada’s visitor statistics for 2012-13.
Number of visits at Parks Canada administered places. 22.4 million visits at Parks Canada administered places by March 2015. 20.6 million as of March 31, 2013.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada made significant progress towards this target in 2012. Visitation to Canada’s treasured places was 20.6 million in 2012-13, an increase of three percent over last year. Compared to 2011-12, overall visits to national parks increased one percent, while visits to national marine conservation areas and national historic sites increased six percent and five percent, respectively. The positive overall growth in visitation is the first Parks Canada has experienced in four years. The results suggest that the cumulative impact of Parks Canada’s research-informed approaches and initiatives, and its industry relations are helping to reverse the previous downward trend in visitation.

Parks Canada places are important components of Canada’s tourism industry, bringing economic benefits to many communities across the country. In 2012-13 the Agency was recognized in the Atlantic region for its efforts to encourage visitation and personal connections with nature and history. Parks Canada was honoured with the 2012 People’s Choice Award for Tourism Operator of the Year (Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site) in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

Parks Canada recognizes that there are Canadians who have yet to visit Canada’s natural and historic places and to experience what millions of people who love and cherish these places already know. To inspire Canadians to visit their national heritage places, Parks Canada will continue to take a strategic and proactive approach to promote Canada’s natural and historic places and the products, services and experiences they offer.

Sub Program - National Parks Interpretation

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national park they are visiting and its natural and cultural resources, and understand their significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as guided walks and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
11,869 11,855 14

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
148 112 36

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national parks learned from experience and active participation.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Source: Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Programxxxi in 2012-13.
Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the place. On average, 60% of visitors at surveyed national parks consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the place. 60%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada met its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national parks who considered that they learned about the natural heritage of the place.xxxii On average, 60 percent of visitors felt they learned about the heritage of the national park they were visiting. Furthermore, seven in 10 (71 percent) of visitors were satisfied with the learning activities available to them in 2012-13. Printed material, interpretation panels, and one-on-one interaction with staff were cited as the most important ways in which visitors to national parks learned about the place.

Learning through experience and active participation helps people develop personal connections with the national parks they visit. Parks Canada recognizes that the interests of Canadians are varied as are the ways people learn and want to experience a place. Some people prefer learning on their own through passive activities, while others prefer to learn through interactions with others. Therefore, the Agency provides visitors with a mix of opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national park they are visiting. Quality interpretative information, guided walks, and demonstrations continued to be provided in 2012-13. Trip planning publications were updated to highlight activities available for youth and families. Parks Canada also continued its popular “Xplorers” program at national parks. Intended for children aged six to 11 years of age and their families, the program involves games, puzzles and prizes, and is designed to be a fun and interactive way for children to learn about, explore and discover Parks Canada’s natural places.

Parks Canada has learned that learning is personal. Visitors determine what they take away from the experience and what tools are important to them in learning something new about the place they are visiting. It is therefore Parks Canada’s responsibility to facilitate a mix of meaningful opportunities to accommodate a diverse mix of visitors.

Sub Program - National Parks Visitor Service Offer

Description

This program supports the more than 12 million visits that are made annually to Canada’s national parks by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national park aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, campgrounds, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
110,691 110,562 129

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
966 847 119

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Source: Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Programxxxiii in 2012-13.
Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit. 93%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target for enjoyment. On average 93 percent of visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit.xxxiv Furthermore, over 81 percent of visitors to surveyed national parks were happy with the quality of activities, 85 percent with the quality of services, 82 percent with the value for entry fee, 98 percent with staff courteousness and 96 percent with service in the language of their choice. These results show positive contributions to the overall expected result of the visitor experience program which aims to personally connect visitors to the places they visit.

To encourage discovery and enjoyment of Canada’s national parks, Parks Canada undertook a number of targeted initiatives in 2012-13:

  • Updated trip-planning publications to include activities offered for youth and families;
  • Offered alternative overnight accommodations, such as yurts, tepees, rustic cabins and all-inclusive camping;
  • Hosted special events;
  • Hosted “Learn to Camp” sessions, which provided families, new Canadians and others, a safe place to learn the technical skills and fun associated with camping;
  • Launched the “Learn to Camp” Smartphone Application;
  • Continued its partnership with the Historica-Dominion Institute and Nature Canada to provide free-entry for Grade 8 and secondary 2 students; and
  • Partnered with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship to offer new Canadians a free entry pass, valid for one year.

Parks Canada continues to recognize that a consistent base offer that appeals to a diverse range of Canadians is necessary to sustain growth in visitation. Also, to ensure continued success, the Agency must offer high quality programs and services and make it easy for Canadians to plan their visit to them. Targeted promotion, quality programs and services, and easy trip planning tools will help inspire Canadians to come and enjoy a national park as part of their vacation plans or weekend adventures in the years to come.

For more information on Visitor Service Offers at Parks Canada’s protected places, please see the Evaluation of Parks Canada’s Visitor Service Offer.xxxv

Sub Program - National Historic Sites Interpretation

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national historic site they are visiting and its cultural resources, and understand their national historical significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as period animation and guided tours and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
33,302 33,264 38

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
343 298 45

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites learned from experience and active participation, and the understanding of the significance of national historic sites is improved.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Source: Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Programxxxvi in 2012-13.
Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place. On average, 85% of visitors at surveyed national historic sites consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place. 87%*
Percentage of the communication element of commemorative integrity rated as poor that is improved. 75% of the communication element of commemorative integrity rated as poor is improved within 5 years of the original assessment. No commemorative integrity evaluations were conducted in 2012-13.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national historic sites who considered that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place.xxxvii On average, 87 percent of visitors felt they learned about the heritage of the national historic site they were visiting. Furthermore, nine in 10 (88 percent) of visitors to national historic sites were satisfied with the learning activities available to them. Exhibits, interpretation panels, self-guided tours, and one-on-one interaction with staff were cited as the most important means by which visitors to national historic sites learned about the place.

Parks Canada recognizes that the interests of Canadians are varied as are the ways people learn and want to experience a place. Some people prefer learning on their own through passive activities, while others prefer to learn through interactions with others. Therefore, the Agency provides visitors with a mix of opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national historic sites they are visiting. Quality interpretative information, guided walks and demonstrations continued to be provided in 2012-13. Trip planning publications were updated to highlight activities available for youth and families. Parks Canada continued its popular “Xplorers” program at select national historic sites. Intended for children aged six to 11 years of age and their families, the program involves games, puzzles and prizes, and is designed to be a fun and interactive way for children to learn about, explore, and discover Park’s Canada’s cultural places. The GPS-based interactive learning tool “Explora” also continued to be available at select national historic sites.

Learning through experience and active participation helps people develop personal connections with the national historic sites they visit. Parks Canada has learned that learning is personal. The visitor determines what they take away from the experience and what tools are important to them in learning something new about the place they are visiting. It is therefore Parks Canada’s responsibility to facilitate a mix of meaningful opportunities to accommodate a diverse mix of visitors.

Sub Program - National Historic Sites Visitor Service Offer

Description

This program supports the more than 9 million visits that are made annually to Canada’s national historic sites by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national historic site aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
58,832 58,763 69

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
441 401 40

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Source: Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Programxxxviii in 2012-13.
Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. 97%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national historic sites who enjoyed their visit.xxxix On average, 97 percent of visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. Furthermore, about 91 percent of visitors to surveyed national historic sites in 2012-13 were happy with the quality of activities, 93 percent with the quality of services, 93 percent with the value for entry, 98 percent with staff courteousness and 98 percent with service in the language of their choice.

To encourage discovery and enjoyment of Canada’s national historic sites, Parks Canada undertook a number of targeted initiatives in 2012-13:

  • Updated trip-planning publications with activities offered for youth and families;
  • Hosted special events, many inspired by the War of 1812;
  • Hosted “Learn to Camp” sessions at a number of historic sites, an activity normally associated with parks. These events provided families, new Canadians and others interested in camping, a safe place to learn the technical skills involved and a chance to experience the fun associated with camping while surrounded by history;
  • Continued its partnership with Historica-Dominion Institute and Nature Canada to provide free entry for Grade 8 and secondary 2 students; and
  • Partnered with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship to offer new Canadians a free entry pass, valid for one year.

Visitors to national historic sites enjoy their visit, but to ensure continued success, Parks Canada must offer high quality programs and services and make it easy for Canadians to plan their visit to them. Proactive promotion, quality programs and services, and easy trip planning tools will help inspire Canadians to come and enjoy a national historic site as part of their vacation plans in the years to come.

For more information on Visitor Service Offers at Parks Canada’s protected places, please see the Evaluation of Parks Canada’s Visitor Service Offer.xl

Sub Program - National Marine Conservation Areas Interpretation

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national marine conservation area they are visiting and its marine natural and cultural resources, and understand their significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as guided tours and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1,107 1,105 2

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
2 2 -

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas learned from experience and active participation.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
TBD TBD n/a

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada’s national marine conservations areas program is in the development phase. Currently, there are only two national marine conservation areas with a fully developed interpretation offer: Saguenay-St. Lawrence and Fathom Five national marine parks. There are no results for this program in 2012-13 as neither marine park was surveyed.

Sub Program - National Marine Conservation Areas Visitor Service Offer

Description

This program supports the visits that are made to Canada’s national marine conservation areas by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national marine conservation area aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1,795 1,793 2

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
9 10 (1)

Performance Results
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas enjoyed their visit.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas enjoyed their visit. n/a

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada’s national marine conservations areas program is in a development phase. Currently there are only two national marine conservation areas with a fully developed visitor service offer: Saguenay- St. Lawrence and Fathom Five national marine parks. There are no results for this program in 2012-13 as neither marine park was surveyed.

Program 5: Townsite And Throughway Infrastructure

Description

This program involves managing, operating and providing municipal services to five townsite communities within Canada’s national parks. It also involves the operation of provincial and inter-provincial highways and waterways that connect communities and pass through national parks and national historic sites.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
113,933 113,933 152,219 91,783 22,150

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
263 255 8

Performance Results
Expected Result
Condition of contemporary infrastructure for townsites and waterways is maintained or improved, and through highways are open to traffic.
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of townsite contemporary assets that are maintained, and percentage of townsite contemporary assets rated as poor or fair that are improved. The condition of 75% of townsite contemporary assets is maintained, and the condition of 25% of assets rated as poor or fair is improved by March 2013. 80%

15%
Percentage of waterway contemporary assets that are maintained, and percentage of waterway contemporary assets rated as poor or fair that are improved. The condition of 75% of waterway contemporary assets is maintained, and the condition of 25% of assets rated as poor or fair is improved by March 2013. 70%

12%
Number of days of closure of through highways due to asset condition. Zero (0) days of closure of through highways due to asset condition. Zero (0)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Townsite Contemporary Assets

As a result of ongoing investments, the overall condition of townsite contemporary assets has remained relatively stable over the past four years. In 2012-13, Parks Canada invested $1.8 million to maintain or improve the condition of its townsite contemporary assets. As of March 31, 2013, the condition of 80 percent of townsite contemporary assets has been maintained, surpassing the target of 75 percent. The Agency improved the condition of 15 percent of townsite contemporary assets rated as poor or fair.

Waterway Contemporary Assets

The Agency continued to conduct dam safety reviews to assess overall status, condition and functionality, and to identify recapitalization requirements to ensure public safety and compliance with direction provided by the Canadian Dam Association. In 2012-13, Parks Canada invested $6 million to maintain or improve the condition of these assets. As of March 31, 2013, the condition of 70 percent of waterway contemporary assets has been maintained. The Agency also improved the condition of 12 percent of waterway contemporary assets rated as poor or fair.

Highway Contemporary Assets

Parks Canada met its target of zero days of closure of through highways due to asset condition. In 2012-13, Parks Canada invested a total of $54.9 million on highway infrastructure.

For more information on contemporary asset condition or highway investments, please visit the Parks Canada website.xli

The Agency is finalizing a national review of its built asset portfolio which will result in updated data related to the condition of the built asset inventory. The Agency recognizes the importance of ensuring information related to highway asset condition is kept current in order to further inform capital investment decisions and ensure public safety.

Variances in P5- Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure

Actual spending for Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure is $22.2 million lower than the 2012-13 planned spending. This is mainly due to the effective management of the program of work related to the twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway near Banff National Park being completed in 2013-14.

Sub Program - Townsite Management

Description

This program involves the operation of five townsite communities within Canada’s national parks. It includes the provision of municipal services such as drinking water, snow removal, garbage pick-up and disposal, sewage treatment, road and street maintenance, and fire services to support residents and visitors. Townsites are important staging areas for visitors to national parks and national historic sites, home to businesses and residents and administrative centers for Parks Canada’s operations.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9,335 7,520 1,815

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
40 40 -

Performance Results
Expected Result
Townsite targets for growth and sewage effluent quality are met.
Performance Indicator Targets Actual Results
Percentage of townsite targets for legislated limits to growth and for sewage effluent quality that are met. 100% of townsite targets for legislated limits to growth are met. 100%
100% of townsite targets for sewage effluent quality are met. 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada manages and provides a number of municipal and related services to the townsite communities of Field in Yoho National Park, Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park. The focus of the Agency’s performance measurement for these communities is meeting targets for commercial growth limits and sewage effluent quality.

As of March 31, 2013, all townsites within national parks were within the legislated growth limits established for each community. Commercial growth limits for each community are required by the Canada National Parks Act and have been defined and fixed in each community plan. Although the limits are specific to each community, they are based on common principles of modest, controlled growth, impact on community character, provision of essential services and impact on ecological integrity.

Stringent Parks Canada Leadership Targets for sewage effluent quality are applied in Field and Lake Louise while the voluntary targets from the Guidelines for Effluent Quality and Wastewater Treatment at Federal Establishments (1976) are applied in Wasagaming, Waskesiu and Waterton. In 2012-13, 25 of 25 targets were met resulting in 100 percent of townsite targets for sewage effluent quality being met.

Effective January 1, 2015, townsite wastewater treatment facilities will be required to meet new federal targets under Environment Canada’s Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (2013) replacing the voluntary targets set out under the Guidelines. Parks Canada is well prepared to meet these new regulations as well as the more stringent targets identified for Field and Lake Louise under Parks Canada’s Leadership Targets.

Sub Program - Through Highway Management

Description

This program involves the operation, maintenance and repair of provincial and inter-provincial highways and bridges that connect communities and pass through national parks and national historic sites. Parks Canada is responsible for approximately 868 kilometres of provincial and inter-provincial highways, including six sections of the Trans-Canada and Yellowhead highways.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
93,000 74,920 18,080

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
186 167 19

Performance Results
Expected Result
Condition of critical assets on through highways is maintained.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Percentage of critical assets (bridges, culverts and snow sheds) on through highways that are at least in fair condition. 100% of critical assets (bridges, culverts and snow sheds) on through highways are at least in fair condition. 58%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Of the 234 critical assets on through highways (bridges, culverts and snow sheds), 58 percent are in good or fair condition. On average, the Agency undertakes condition assessments for each of its more than 11,000 built assets on five-year cycles. As a result, current information related to the improvement or decline in the condition of the Agency’s asset portfolio reflects the asset’s most recent assessment.

The Agency is finalizing a national review of its built asset portfolio which will result in more accurate and updated data related to the condition of the built asset inventory. The magnitude and complexity of the Agency’s asset base underscores the need for accurate information to inform strategic decision-making that focuses investments on the highest priorities.

Sub Program – Through Waterway Management

Description

This program involves the water control aspect of operations for nine national historic canals/waterways including the Trent-Severn Waterway, the Rideau, Lachine and Chambly canals. This includes more than 650 kilometres of waterway and 25,000 square kilometres of drainage basin.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
11,598 9,343 2,255

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
37 48 (11)

Performance Results
Expected Result
Effective water level management.
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Percentage of water level gauge measurements that are within the prescribed range established to meet legal and/or operational obligations. 90% of water-level gauge measurements are within the prescribed range established to meet legal and/or operational obligations. 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, the water levels were maintained so that waterways were open for 100 percent of the navigation season with no closures.

Parks Canada manages nine heritage canals/waterways: the Trent-Severn Waterway and the Carillon, Chambly, Lachine, Rideau, Saint-Ours, Sault Ste. Marie, Ste. Anne-de-Bellevue and St. Peter’s canals.

Parks Canada regularly monitors water gauge measurements to assess water levels against established standards. This practice helps the Agency to effectively manage the navigation channels so that Canadians can use and enjoy their heritage waterways throughout the navigation season.

The Agency continues to invest in the water management infrastructure of its waterways to maintain reliable navigation. In 2012-13, the Agency invested nearly $6 million to maintain or improve the condition of its waterways assets. In addition, the Government of Canada invested nearly $4 million via Canada’s Economic Action Plan to rebuild dams so that Canadians can continue to use and enjoy the waterways.

Program: Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
71,546 71,546 92,096 85,547 (14,001)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
Note: FTEs, both planned and actual, do not include students.
492 492 -

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme 4 Icon - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint Beginning with Government Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Financial Management Services

The implementation of the Government’s Financial Management Framework, which places increased expectations on reporting and stewardship, is ongoing at Parks Canada. In 2012-13 Parks Canada implemented changes to the Directive on the Management of Expenditures on Travel, Hospitality and Conferences and implemented an event management approval process across the Agency.

In 2012-13, Parks Canada continued to improve its financial management governance framework. The Agency maintained its Management Accountability Framework assessment rating for financial management by virtue of the performance of its financial planning cycle, the quality of the required reports produced during the year and the Agency’s financial system investments adhering to Government of Canada standards. Budget 2012 removed the need for audited financial statements at Parks Canada.

In response to the Treasury Board of Canada’s Policy on Internal Control, Parks Canada continues to document and to assess design effectiveness of the Agency’s processes. This action plan forms part of the Statement of Management Responsibility including Internal Controls over Financial Reporting included in this Performance Report.

Parks Canada actively participated in interdepartmental working groups led by the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada to develop common financial management business processes. In 2012-13 the Agency continued or completed the implementation of a series of automated tools to harmonize financial management business processes within the Agency, including a direct deposit functionality, electronic specimen signature cards and a point-of-sale system for the collection of user fees across most of Parks Canada’s places accompanied by a set of policy instruments to ensure user fee revenue is properly controlled, deposited, and accounted for in an accurate and timely manner.

Management and Oversight Services

Internal Audit

The internal audit function has developed a risk-based approach for prioritizing potential audit projects and is in the process of improving its individual audit engagement planning by more clearly defining the key risks and therefore the audit scope for each project. Audit costs, both time and expenditures, are continually tracked. An independent practice inspection of the function was completed in 2012-2013 and it concluded that the function meets all Treasury Board and Institute of Internal Auditor’s professional practice requirements.

Departmental Security

Parks Canada has made important progress in addressing known deficiencies and improving efficiencies in key security activities. A major achievement in 2012-13 was the approval of the Parks Canada Departmental Security Plan, which provides a departmental security governance structure within Parks Canada; demonstrates alignment with Parks Canada programs; outlines security threats, risks and vulnerabilities; and presents a five-year action plan for improving security. Other achievements include the development of a draft Strategic Emergency Management Plan, draft personnel screening procedures and the establishment of standardized templates and procedures to support threat and risk assessment activities.

Human Resources Management Services

In 2012-13, Parks Canada implemented work-force reductions and restructuring consistent with the Government of Canada’s efforts to return to a balanced budget, streamline government activities and ensure value for Canadians. Separate employer status was leveraged in the development of an accelerated Work Force Adjustment (WFA) process designed to minimize uncertainty, retain a workforce aligned with future organizational needs, and to help ensure that each member of the Parks Canada team was treated with fairness, dignity and respect. Interim staffing policies and processes, local and national WFA committees, and an automated Priority Administration System were created to increase employment opportunities for affected employees. Parks Canada remains diligent in finding employment opportunities within the organization for surplus and layoff status employees.

Change management initiatives were launched focusing on leveraging the talent and engagement of its team members while creating a respectful and effective workplace. Recognizing the engagement risk presented by WFA, regional “One Team, One Vision, One Voice” workshops facilitated by senior management were launched, which fostered deep commitment within the middle management community and alignment to the overall strategic direction of the Agency. Regular communications from the CEO to Parks Canada team members further assisted in implementing change, particularly in terms of helping managers provide effective employee support. To further support transition, a Virtual Team Management learning product was developed and piloted.

Continued advancement towards a cost-effective e-learning environment was made through the development and delivery of an employee support webinar series in 50 sessions across the Agency. Occupational health and safety and delegation of human resources authorities’ e-learning products were also developed. Though the Agency’s Employee Support Strategy during WFA superseded other planned learning initiatives, finalization of a learning strategy focused on blended learning approaches, including e-learning, will resume as a focus for the upcoming year.

Finally, the upgrade of the Agency’s HR information management system was completed. A focus was placed on enhanced process automation, including the Government of Canada integrated Leave Self-Service (LSS) component, which facilitates submission of leave requests in remote situations. The upgrade enables more efficient and effective responses to business requirements, positions the Agency to take advantage of federal government HR systems enhancement initiatives, supports business process re-engineering and the enterprise-wide integration of common human resources business processes.

Real Property Services

Asset Management

As part of its overall asset management strategy, Parks Canada is finalizing a national review of its built asset portfolio, which will result in updated asset data related to inventory, asset condition, current replacement values, and estimates of deferred work. As a result, the Agency will be better positioned to ensure resources are allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.

Parks Canada continues to implement a new investment planning cycle and process that will facilitate the establishment of investment priorities, the allocation of funds to projects and the monitoring of capital investments.

Information Management Services

A Record Keeping (RK) Compliance Implementation Plan was submitted to Treasury Board in August 2012. In accordance with the plan, the exercise to identify Information Resources of Business Value (IRBV) and corresponding information repositories is currently underway. Identifying the information resources that best represents Parks Canada’s accountability for decision making, program and service delivery is a key requirement of the Government of Canada’s Record Keeping Directive to which Parks Canada must comply by March 31, 2015. In order to meet this requirement a comprehensive RK engagement methodology has been developed to guide the Agency through the identification and collection of IRBV information from all of its business units. Once the results of this exercise have been fully compiled, this information will be submitted to Library and Archives Canada (LAC) to obtain the corresponding information disposition authorities.

Led by the Agency’s Evaluation and Audit team a Core Management Information Needs Assessment was completed. The findings from this undertaking are being used to further inform RK work and requirements for the ongoing effective management of corporate information.

Other Administrative Services

Aboriginal Affairs

The Aboriginal Affairs Secretariat at Parks Canada has developed a two day training course on Aboriginal Consultation and Accommodation and, together with the Department of Justice, has delivered it 19 times to a total 312 staff across Canada. The course is intended to give Parks Canada staff the tools and knowledge to initiate and strengthen relationships with Aboriginal partners and maintain the honour of the Crown when fulfilling our legal duty to consult.

Greening Government Operations

Parks Canada is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services Program. The Agency contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS: Green Buildings, Green Procurement, E-Waste, Managed Print, Paper Consumption, Green Meetings and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings and Fleet. For additional details on Parks Canada’s Greening Government Operations activities, please see the List of Supplementary Information Tables in Section III.

Variances in Internal Services

Variances in financial resources are mainly due to funding received throughout the year but not reflected in the planned spending. There is no variance in human resources. As a consequence of the consolidation of National office and Service Centres, resources previously accounted for under other programs are now accounted for under Internal Services. This resulting increase is offset by reductions in resources for internal services, related to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Parks Canada Agency’s unaudited financial statements are prepared in accordance with the Government’s accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards (accrual accounting principles) and, therefore, are different from appropriation-based reporting, which is reflected in Sections I and II of this report. Sections I and II are prepared on a modified cash basis rather than an accrual basis. A reconciliation between the parliamentary appropriations used (modified cash basis) and the net cost of operations (accrual basis) is set out in note 11 of the financial statements.

Parks Canada Agency
Condensed Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013 ($ thousands)
2012–13
Planned Results
2012–13
Actual
2011–12
Actual
(Restated)
$ Change
(2012–13 Planned vs. Actual)
$ Change
(2012–13 Actual vs. 2011–12 Actual)
Total expenses 698,341 655,822 732,295 42,519 (76,473)
Total revenues 115,606 115,315 114,218 291 1,097
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 582,735 540,507 618,077 42,228 (77,570)
Net financial position 1,758,972 1,760,551 1,739,190 (1,579) 21,361


Parks Canada Agency
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013 ($ thousands)
2012–13 2011–12
(Restated)
$ Change
Total net liabilities 162,192 182,862 (20,670)
Total net financial assets 81,333 76,798 4,535
Net debt 80,859 106,064 (25,205)
Total non-financial assets 1,841,410 1,845,254 (3,844)
Net financial position 1,760,551 1,739,190 21,361

Graphs and Analysis

Expenses by Program

Pie Chart - Expenses by Program

[long description]

See note 14 of the financial statements – Segmented Information

In 2012-13, the total expenses were $655.8 million, a $76.5 million (10.4 percent) decrease from 2011-12. The majority of this decrease is explained by the reduction in salaries and employee benefits ($40.9 million) following the implementation of restraint measures. In addition, the overall reduction in the number of projects undertaken during this transition year caused a decrease in professional and special services requirements ($8.4 million). Amortization of tangible capital assets has also decreased by $21.2 million when certain assets became fully amortized after 25 years.

The majority of the expenses consists of salary and employee benefits for $385.9 million (58.8 percent). Visitor Experience and Heritage Resources Conservation Programs account for more than half of the total expenses (56.0 percent).

Variance of $42.5 million with the planned results for 2012-13 can also be explained by the actual decrease in salaries and employee benefits compared to the estimated reduction which was unknown at the time of the preparation of the planned results. In addition, implementation of certain projects during this fiscal year created variances with the planned results for Heritage Resources Conservation and Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure Programs.

Revenues by Major Classification

Pie Chart - Revenues by Major Classification

[long description]

See note 14 of the financial statements – Segmented Information

Total revenues amounted to $115.3 million for 2012-13. Revenues have slightly increased by $1.1 million compared to prior year’s total of $114.2 million. The majority of the revenue is derived from entrance fees and recreational fees, which together represent 72 percent of total revenues.

Revenues from the Visitor Experience Program amounted to $84.6 million, representing 73.4 percent of the total revenues of the Agency.

The variance between actual and planned revenues, of $115.6 million, is $0.3 million.

Assets

Pie Chart - Assets

[long description]

See notes 7, 8 and 9 of the financial statements – Due from Consolidated revenue fund, Inventory of consumable supplies and Tangible capital assets

The assets have not varied significantly during the 2012-13 fiscal year, having increased by $0.7 million. The total value of assets of $1,922.7 million is comprised of financial assets of $81.3 million and non-financial assets of $1,841.4 million.

A decrease of $5.8 million in the net-book value of tangible capital assets is mainly caused by disposals and write-offs during the year. In 2012-13, the amount of asset acquisitions matched the annual amortization costs. Tangible capital assets represent the most important component of the Agency’s financial statements and accounts for 95 percent of the total assets.

Liabilities

Pie Chart - Liabilities

[long description]

See notes 3, 4, 5 and 6b) of the financial statements – Deferred revenue, Lease obligation for tangible capital assets, Employee future benefits and Environmental liability

Total liabilities were $162.2 million at March 31, 2013, decreasing from the balance of $182.9 million at March 31, 2012. The decrease is mainly due to the reduction in the accrued liabilities related to salary benefits and employee future benefits payouts made as part of the implementation of restraint measures.

The Accounts payable and accrued liabilities and the Employee future benefits are the largest components of the liabilities which together represented 75 percent of total liabilities in 2012-13.

Financial Statements

Visit the Parks Canada website to view a full set of the Agency’s unaudited financial statements.

Supplementary Information Tables

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluationsxlii publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

General Inquiries:
Parks Canada National Office
25-7-N Eddy Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
K1A 0M5

General Inquiries:
888-773-8888

General Inquiries (International):
613-860-1251

Teletypewriter (TTY):
866-787-6221

Additional Information

Métis Reconciliation

The Government of Canada is committed to building strong, effective and mutually beneficial working relationships with Métis and other Aboriginal groups. A multi-departmental strategy to implement programs related to the reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights was approved in 2010, led by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and involving Parks Canada, Environment Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Under this strategy, Parks Canada will receive a total of $5.12 millionxliii spread equally over five years; the first year of funding was 2010-11.

Work continued on 15 projects in Western Canada during 2012-2013. Four projects specifically aimed at relationship building and consultation with Métis continued at Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site, Jasper National Park, Wood Buffalo National Park and Grasslands National Park. Other projects focussed on new or improved on-site interpretation of Métis history and culture at several national historic sites including Batoche, Battle of Tourond’s Coulee and Fish Creek, Battle of Seven

Oaks, and The Forks in Winnipeg. New programming was also developed for Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site, for a travelling exhibit about Riel House National Historic Site, and for a trail at Fort Walsh National Historic Site.

To provide the information necessary for the above interpretation projects, a guide to Métis research and resources within Parks Canada was compiled for use by Parks Canada staff. Beyond Fiddles and Sashes was begun during 2012-13 and will be completed in 2013-14.

Proposals for three projects that are national in scope were developed in 2012-13. They include a series of video and photo shoots to record the overall initiative accomplishments in the field, funding for celebrations with Métis partners to be held in the field, and a focus on increased internal awareness of Métis rights by Parks Canada employees.

Endnotes

i Definition of the concept of Ecological Integrity Definition of the concept of Commemorative Integrity

ii Parks Canada website

iii Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing-committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

iv Browsing refers to the action carried out by animals when feeding on the leaves, shoots or fruits of woody plants such as shrubs.

v The Copenhagen Accord is a document that lays out a road map for international commitment to continue to combat climate change. It included commitments by developed countries to scale up financing in the short and long term, with fast-start financing approaching US$30 billion over 2010-12.

vi Public Accounts of Canada 2013

vii Results of Strategic Environmental Assessments

viii Additional details on Parks Canada’s activities to support sustainable development and the SEA process

ix Environment Canada website

x This strategic outcome target is also a target under Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection of the 2010-13 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (Theme III: Protecting Nature) for which Parks Canada has been identified as the federal lead.

xi More information on the results of the 2012-13 re-evaluations, and the five year trend for impairment of commemorative integrity

xii The National Survey of Canadians is a telephone survey of a representative sample of Canadians. The survey was last conducted in February 2012 and 3,786 respondents completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of four percent – the industry standard for telephone surveys today. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence). The next NSC is planned for February/March 2014.

xiii Connection to a place means that an individual feels pride and meaning in a place, sense of caring and has fond memories of it.

xiv More details on commemorations

xv Details on the progress made on park establishment proposals, as well as other current proposals

xvi The mandate of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada is to advise the Government of Canada, through the Minister of the Environment, on the commemoration of nationally significant aspects of Canada’s history.

xvii Details on progress in establishing national marine conservation areas in unrepresented regions

xviii Environment Canada website (Ecological Integrity of National Parks)

xix For more information on the reassessment results for both Grosse-Île and the Irish Memorial, and Fort McNab national historic sites

xx For additional information on Action on the Ground projects and their achievements

xxi The seven townsite communities include: Banff and Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Field in Yoho National Park, Jasper in Jasper National Park, Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park.

xxiv The National Survey of Canadians is a telephone survey of a representative sample of Canadians. The survey was last conducted in February 2012 and 3,786 respondents completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of four percent – the industry standard for telephone surveys today. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence). The next NSC is planned for February/March 2014.

xxv The National Survey of Canadians is a telephone survey of a representative sample of Canadians. The survey was last conducted in February 2012 and 3,786 respondents completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of four percent – the industry standard for telephone surveys today. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence). The next NSC is planned for February/March 2014.

xxvi The Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Strategy is an online survey of a representative sample of Parks Canada’s stakeholders and partners. The survey was last administered in November 2009. In total, 2,538 stakeholders and partners were invited to participate in the study, 781 of whom completed the survey, representing a response rate of 31 percent. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence).

xxvii Meaningful is a subjective measure of personal connection and is based on an individual’s internalization of his or her experiences at a particular heritage place. Experiences important to fostering personal connection vary by visitor.

xxviii Satisfaction is a subjective measure of overall experience. Services, activities, and interactions with staff are among the many things that contribute to a visitor’s level of satisfaction. The mix of factors important to an individual varies by visitor.

xxix Information about Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Program

xxx Visitor Information Program results for visitor satisfaction and meaningfulness of visit

xxxi Information about Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Program

xxxii Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

xxxiii Information about Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Program

xxxiv Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

xxxv Evaluation of Parks Canada’s Visitor Service Offer

xxxvi Information about Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Program

xxxvii Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

xxxviii Information about Parks Canada’s Visitor Information Program

xxxix Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

xl Evaluation of Parks Canada’s Visitor Service Offer

xli More information on contemporary asset condition or highway investments

xlii The Department of Finance’s Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

xliii The Agency received $5.12 million in 2010-11 rather than $4.25 million as previously reported in the 2011-12 Performance Report. The difference is attributed to $4.25 million going to Western and Northern Region projects with the remainder going to National Office projects.