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2017-18 Departmental Plan

Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

Chief Executive Officer’s Message

Plans at a Glance

Raison d’être, Mandate and Role: Who We Are and What We Do

Operating Context: Conditions Affecting our Work

Key Risks: Things That Could Affect our Ability to Achieve our Plans and Results

Planned Results: What We Want to Achieve This Year and Beyond

Spending and Human Resources

Supplementary Information

Appendix A: Definitions

Endnotes


Minister’s Message

Photo of The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of the Environment and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Our 2017–18 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what we do and the results we are trying to achieve during the upcoming year. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The title of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve, while continuing to provide transparency on how tax payers’ dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017–18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government’s priorities. I am fully confident that this new report will allow Parliament and Canadians to better monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change to Canadians.

As we celebrate Canada 150 during 2017, I am particularly proud to be the Minister responsible for Parks Canada and its important mandate, which is to protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

With a new year comes new opportunities for Parks Canada to build on its past achievements, connect with Canadians and continue to prudently manage one of the finest and most extensive systems of protected natural and cultural heritage areas in the world. The Government is working to expand and better protect Canada’s system of national parks and national marine conservation areas. These protected areas play an important role to help mitigate the impacts of climate change by protecting and restoring healthy, resilient ecosystems and contributing to the recovery of species at risk. Parks Canada continues to establish new national parks and national marine conservation areas in partnership with Indigenous Peoples, including the proposed Thaidene Nëné national park reserve in the Northwest Territories and the proposed national marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound in Nunavut. To deliver on our promise to protect at least 17% of Canada’s terrestrial and inland waters areas by 2020, the Agency is co-chairing a national effort, with colleagues across all jurisdictions, to develop a cohesive plan for reaching this target.

The Government is committed to protecting the ecological integrity of our national parks as the first priority in all aspects of their management, whilst ensuring Canadians have opportunities to experience and enjoy these special places. We must continue to develop new and innovative programs and services to enable more Canadians, including youth and newcomers, to experience the outdoors and understand, appreciate and enjoy nature. By building connections to nature in these places, we can foster the stewards of tomorrow—people who know and care about our irreplaceable treasures.

As Canada’s largest provider of natural and cultural tourism, Parks Canada’s protected heritage areas form important cornerstones of Canada’s local, regional, and national tourism industry. The Agency protects and presents these national treasures because they are living legacies that tell stories of who we are, including the history, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous Peoples.

2017 will be a truly memorable experience at Parks Canada locations—from free entry to expanded learn-to-camp opportunities, to over 40 Indigenous interpretive experiences delivered in partnership with local Indigenous communities, to bioblitzes held across the country—the opportunities are endless.

The Government of Canada is committed to a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples based on a recognition of rights, respect and partnership. Parks Canada will continue to build collaborative working relationships with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities to advance reconciliation going forward.

Parks Canada has launched an ambitious initiative to unveil and install approximately 400 plaques commemorating persons, places, and events of national historic significance over the next few years. This will help Canadians, including new Canadians and youth, learn more about their communities’ history and Canada’s diverse heritage. In 2017, the Agency is working towards unveiling 150 plaques as part of the Canada 150 celebrations and the 100th anniversary of national historic sites.

Whether you are looking for outdoor adventure, fun for the whole family, or memorable ways to learn about and get closer to nature or our country’s history, Canada’s national parks, national urban park, national historic sites, historic canals and national marine conservation areas have something special to offer everyone.

original signed by

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada


Chief Executive Officer’s Message

Photo of Daniel Watson, Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada Agency

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation in 2017, the Government of Canada invites Canadians to experience nature and learn more about our history. To mark this momentous occasion, admission to all Parks Canada places is free throughout the year. Our Parks Canada team and I are proud to welcome Canadians and visitors from around the world to experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural treasures.

Parks Canada is one of the oldest continuous national parks services in the world, having been established in 1911. The national parks system is recognized as a national treasure – a symbol of Canada’s identity – that must be protected and wisely managed while providing Canadians with opportunities to discover and enjoy it.

Parks Canada is proud of its leadership in conservation. Through its Conservation and Restoration Program, Parks Canada will continue to address priority ecological integrity issues and to contribute to the recovery of species at risk through a variety of projects such as the restoration of Cap-des-Rosiers coastal shoreline in Forillon National Park, and the reintroduction of Plains Bison in Banff National Park.

Our national historic sites and cultural resources reflect the rich history and diversity of our nation and provide an opportunity for Canadians to understand, appreciate and enjoy their heritage. Parks Canada is investing in the preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of our national historic sites to protect our heritage and strengthen their appeal as destinations to celebrate our nation's achievements. By preserving and recording archaeological sites under threat like the ones found at the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site, this rich heritage will not be lost. Parks Canada’s expanded National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places provides an additional $20 million over two years to help protect and preserve non-federally owned national historic sites, heritage lighthouses and heritage railway stations, thus supporting local economies and tourism.

Parks Canada is continuing its efforts to reach a new generation of stewards of our natural and cultural heritage. Through urban outreach programs, Campus Clubs, the popular Learn to Camp initiative, social media initiatives, and international collaborations like #NatureForAll, Parks Canada is connecting youth, new Canadians, and urban families to our country’s national heritage treasures. These efforts are helping Canadians, who may have never before enjoyed the pleasure of a visit to a national park or national historic site, learn about Parks Canada, get outside, connect with nature and history, and appreciate the many benefits that our national system of heritage places provides.

In keeping with the Government of Canada commitment to reconciliation, Parks Canada will continue to engage Indigenous partners to strengthen their connection to traditionally used lands and waters, expand the presentation and commemoration of the history and cultures of Indigenous Peoples, and increase economic opportunities related to Indigenous tourism at heritage places.

Parks Canada is entering its third year of implementing an unprecedented infrastructure investment of over $3 billion in improvements to cultural heritage, visitor experience, waterway and highway assets across Canada. We are preserving irreplaceable cultural heritage from coast to coast, including projects at the Halifax Citadel, Fort George and the Fortress of Louisbourg national historic sites and at locks on heritage canals. We are renewing and improving visitor facilities across the country including at Jasper National Park, Fathom Five National Marine Park and the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park to ensure safe, high-quality experiences. This investment will help protect and preserve our treasured places, while supporting local economies, contributing to growth in the tourism sector, and strengthening their appeal as destinations to celebrate our nation.

As Canada marks the 150th anniversary of Confederation and the 100th anniversary of national historic sites, I encourage all Canadians and visitors from around the world to come and join us for this yearlong celebration. Our Parks Canada team of dedicated professionals is waiting to welcome you.

original signed by

Daniel Watson
Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada Agency


Plans at a Glance

Priority: Asset Investment

In support of the Government of Canada’s priority to develop Parks Canada’s programs and services, the Agency is investing over $3 billion over five years to improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage buildings and structures. This investment will help to address the loss of irreplaceable built heritage of national significance, renew visitor facilities, improve canal and townsite infrastructure and ensure highways that pass through heritage places are safe and accessible for travellers. With these improvements, Parks Canada can continue to welcome Canadians and visitors to its heritage places so that they can appreciate, experience and learn more about their natural and cultural heritage.

Priority: Conservation Gains

Parks Canada will support the Government of Canada’s priorities to expand the national parks system by advancing two national park proposals; increase the protection of Canada’s marine and coastal areas to five percent by 2017 and 10 percent by 2020 by advancing at least four national marine conservation proposals; and enhance Canada’s first national urban park. Through its Conservation and Restoration Program, Parks Canada will undertake priority natural resource conservation and restoration actions that contribute to the government’s priority of a clean environment and result in tangible and measurable conservation outcomes that build public support for park management as informed by scientific evidence and Indigenous knowledge. Parks Canada will continue planning and monitoring to identify threats of climate change and to develop best practices and adaptation measures. Currently, the Agency is assessing how monitoring approaches may be adjusted to report on these impacts and is considering climate change projections in its monitoring thresholds.

Parks Canada is responsible for ensuring that irreplaceable heritage buildings and structures are protected and passed on to future generations and that Canadians continue to experience our rich history and heritage. In 2017–18, conservation gains will be made mostly through infrastructure investments for the improvement of the condition of cultural resources located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas. In addition, Parks Canada will be undertaking significant measures to ensure that one of the largest collections of historical and archaeological objects in North America is conserved and protected in a sustainable manner for future generations.

Parks Canada will continue to work with Indigenous partners to ensure that the management of its natural and cultural resources integrates Indigenous traditional knowledge and respects Indigenous values and perspectives. Together, these efforts to conserve Canada’s natural and cultural heritage will also contribute to the Government of Canada’s priority to increase Canadians’ ability to experience, appreciate, and learn about their heritage.

Priority: Canada 150

Canada 150, the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, will engage Canadians across the country, including Indigenous Peoples, in events and celebrations that will reinforce pride and attachment to Canada, maximize opportunities for economic benefits and leave a lasting legacy. In 2017, as part of celebrations, entry will be free to all national parks, national historic sites, and national marine conservation areas, as well as lockage on canals. This gift from the Government of Canada to all Canadians is an unparalleled opportunity for Parks Canada to reach more Canadians and help them enjoy their national heritage places. In turn, visitors to Parks Canada places will have a unique opportunity to explore and connect with these treasures. Parks Canada will offer special programming including celebrations to commemorate the 100th anniversary of national historic sites, which also occurs in 2017.

Priority: Connecting Canadians and Visitors to Heritage Places

To fulfill the Government of Canada’s priority to have more Canadians experience and learn about the environment and their heritage places, Parks Canada will develop and innovate its programs and services. In 2017 and beyond, the Agency will implement strategies to ensure targeted audiences such as youth, newcomers and urban audiences are inspired to visit and connect. Canadians from across the country and visitors from around the world will visit Parks Canada places in 2017 as a result of free admission and develop a stronger connection to Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. Beginning in 2018, entry to Parks Canada places will be free for children under the age of 18. To further engage new Canadians, Parks Canada will continue to offer new citizens complimentary admission to Parks Canada’s destinations for one year. Parks Canada will also work with Indigenous communities to share their cultures and values through authentic experiences at Canada’s heritage places.

Parks Canada is tailoring experiences to a changing demographic, by offering diverse accommodation and shorter stays, and enhancing programs and activities for youth and families, with the goal of connecting Canadians to Canada’s heritage places in 2017 and beyond. These efforts by Parks Canada create a greater appreciation of conservation and contribute to tourism in communities across Canada, supporting the Government of Canada’s priority to stimulate economic growth in hundreds of communities across Canada.

For more information on Parks Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned Results” section of this report.


Raison d’être, Mandate and Role: Who We Are and What We Do

Raison d’être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for the Parks Canada Agency. Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrityi of these places for present and future generations. Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas, of which Parks Canada is the proud steward, offer Canadians opportunities to visit, experience and personally connect with these heritage places. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with a number of partners, including Indigenous Peoples, stakeholders and neighbouring communities.

Mandate and Role

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Vision

Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Responsibilities

As the first national park service in the world, Parks Canada is responsible for including representative examples of Canada’s natural regions in a system of national parks.ii The system, which is 77 percent complete, represents the diversity of natural regions and landscapes in Canada. Forty-six national parks represent 30 of Canada’s 39 terrestrial natural regions and protect 328,198 square kilometres of Canada’s lands. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to maintain or restore ecological integrity, and to provide Canadians with opportunities to discover, appreciate and enjoy their natural heritage.

The Rouge National Urban Parkiii—the first of its kind in Canada—provides a unique opportunity to connect urban Canadians to their natural and cultural heritage and protects the park’s natural ecosystems and cultural landscapes, as well as maintaining its native wildlife and the health of those ecosystems.

Through the National Program of Historical Commemoration, the Government of Canada has designated 980 national historic sites, of which 171 are administered by Parks Canada, 696 persons of national historic significance, and 480 events of national historic significance. These designations are essential to present our stories and significant places and reflect who we are as Canadians. Parks Canada brings to life the key moments of Canada’s history at the national historic sites it administers through special programming that offers unique opportunities for visitors to personally connect with and experience these places.

The system of national marine conservation areasiv is 17 percent complete and protects approximately 15,740 square kilometres of Canada’s marine and Great Lakes ecosystems. The country’s four national marine conservation areas represent five of Canada’s 29 marine regions. The Agency works to ensure the ecological sustainability of national marine conservation areas which includes protecting its key features for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians, visitors and coastal communities.

Parks Canada’s nine heritage canalsv support commercial and recreational boating, and the Agency’s role includes water management as well as the management of bridge and dam infrastructure for the benefit of Canadians.

In 2015-16, Parks Canada welcomed more than 23 million people to the heritage places it administers with a focus on enabling visitors to enjoy these places on their own terms.

Parks Canada manages eight heritage designation and protection programs in support of other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, Indigenous groups and Canadian communities. These programs reflect the Government of Canada’s commitment to the commemoration and conservation of heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, federal heritage buildings, federal archaeology, Canadian heritage rivers, and UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The Parks Canada National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places (formerly known as the National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program) is a contribution program to encourage and support the protection and presentation of non-federally-owned national historic sites, heritage railway stations and heritage lighthouses.

Internationally, the Agency represents Canada as State Party to UNESCO’s World Heritage Convention and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and through participation in other international organizations, conventions and agreements.

More information on Parks Canada’s mandate and responsibilities is available on its website.vi

For more general information about the Agency, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the Agency’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.vii


Operating Context: Conditions Affecting our Work

National parks, national historic sites, and national marine conservation areas represent the very best of Canada, including the history, culture and living legacy of Indigenous Peoples. The Government of Canada is committed to a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples based on reconciliation, recognition of rights, respect and partnership. Parks Canada demonstrates leadership both nationally and internationally in its relations with Indigenous partners, working with over 300 Indigenous communities across the country in the management of Parks Canada’s heritage places. Twenty-nine heritage places are currently managed cooperatively with Indigenous groups. The Agency is committed to reconciliation and will continue to engage and consult with Indigenous partners and organizations in the coming year.

Promising Pathways, a Parks Canada guide to working with Indigenous partners, fosters a spirit of collaboration in the management of heritage places. In addition, Parks Canada is working with Indigenous communities to expand the presentation and commemoration of the histories and cultures of Indigenous peoples.

Parks Canada has operations across Canada. With responsibility for the management and administration of 46 national parks, Rouge National Urban Park, four national marine conservation areas and 171 federal national historic sites, including nine historic canals, Parks Canada employees and resources are active in hundreds of communities and remote locations from coast to coast to coast.

The support and collaboration of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities, as well as provincial and territorial governments, are essential to Parks Canada’s ability to create or expand national parks and establish new national marine conservation areas. In addition, the requirement for national marine conservation areas to balance protection and ecologically sustainable use, brings in a greater range of stakeholders to consider and work with. Bringing all of these elements together and moving forward in a harmonious and positive way requires time and respectful discourse.

Climate change and other environmental forces challenge the integrity of ecosystems and the condition of Parks Canada’s cultural resources and contemporary infrastructure. Shoreline erosion at national historic sites, the introduction of invasive species at national parks, impacts on biodiversity and the ability of species to adapt to variations in the ecosystem are all examples of the effects of climate change. The increasing severity and frequency of disturbances such as storms, floods and avalanches also impact Parks Canada infrastructure, such as highways and bridges.

Parks Canada must protect its natural and cultural heritage places while encouraging visitation to ensure that these special places remain relevant in the hearts and minds of Canadians.

From 2003 to 2012, Parks Canada experienced nearly a decade of declining visitation when fewer Canadians felt connected to their heritage places. The Agency has invested significant effort in reversing this trend and encouraging Canadians to experience and engage with Parks Canada places.

Our country is changing. We are more diverse than ever before, and one in five Canadians was born outside of Canada. We are more urban than ever before, and 80 percent of Canadians now live in urban areas. Our population is growing older and, for the first time in our history, seniors outnumber youth under the age of 15. While Parks Canada has a committed base of visitors who are over the age of 50 and live in rural areas, the generation following has a weaker connection to our country’s heritage places. They also have different expectations for their vacation and recreational experiences, and they use media and telecommunications in different ways. To engage the next generation of Canadians in their natural and cultural heritage, Parks Canada must use modern market analysis and social science to design and offer new and innovative visitor experiences and use new approaches to promotion to reach new audiences. These efforts will help to establish a new generation of stewards for these special places and contribute to tourism economies in communities across the country.

Free admission in 2017 could lead to an increase in visitors at some Parks Canada places, which could result in longer line-ups and challenges in booking campgrounds, and compromise visitor experiences. Furthermore, overcrowding at popular heritage places could have impacts on natural and cultural resources. Parks Canada strives to ensure that visitors continue to be satisfied with services offered. While there are some locations that already experience consistently high visitation, there are nonetheless others that can welcome more visitors. Working to balance visitation across the Parks Canada network will help to ensure that more Canadians have memorable experiences at Parks Canada places while managing high rates of visitation at some places. Moreover, during Canada 150, Parks Canada remains committed to maintaining its role as a world leader in conservation and in preserving the ecological integrity and cultural resources of these treasured places, now and for future generations.

Parks Canada manages a complex portfolio of built assets valued at approximately $17.5 billion. Highways maintained by Parks Canada serve as critical socio-economic corridors enabling the flow of people and commercial goods. Along with heritage canals, highways additionally serve as vital links connecting Canadian communities.

The overall condition of Parks Canada’s asset portfolio has been in decline for years. This deterioration has slowed since 2014 as a result of an infrastructure investment of over $3 billion by the Government of Canada enabling Parks Canada to rehabilitate a significant portion of it's built asset inventory. However, the Agency’s ability to maintain its built asset portfolio in accordance with industry standards, enabling program and service delivery for the long-term, remains an issue.

The collection of timely, quality data along with modernized information systems are essential for evidence-based decision making and reporting. Parks Canada requires new and integrated systems. For example, the current lack of accurate and reliable information on the status of many of the cultural resources managed by Parks Canada will be addressed by completing the development of a Cultural Resource Management Information System. This system will enhance reporting capabilities and inform evidence-based cultural resource management decisions.


Key Risks: Things That Could Affect our Ability to Achieve our Plans and Results

Key Risks

Environmental Forces Adaptation and Response

Parks Canada’s heritage places may be vulnerable to environmental forces including changes to climate (global warming, increased sea levels), physical environment (air quality, water quality, ocean acidification and connectivity), biodiversity (ecosystem processes, increased number of species at risk, hyperabundant species and invasive species) and habitat loss. Environmental forces also impact the timing and frequency of naturally occurring phenomena such as wildfires, floods, avalanches, landslides, hurricanes, storm surges, blizzards and hail. Such events have the potential to affect Parks Canada’s operations and Canadians in communities within and around parks and sites and cause serious harm to the safety, health, welfare, property or environment of people.

Due to the rapid change in climate experienced in many parts of the world, but particularly noticeable in the extreme northern regions of Canada, Parks Canada may not be able to ensure the conservation of all cultural resources under its responsibility. The commemorative integrity of certain national historic sites may be impacted as cultural resources and related heritage value are threatened by rapid and unpredictable environmental changes.

Built Asset Condition and Long-term Sustainability

Parks Canada’s 2016 Asset Report Card reported that 47 percent of the Agency’s built assets were in poor to very poor condition. The overall condition of Parks Canada’s asset portfolio has been in decline for years. This deterioration has slowed since 2014 as a result of an unprecedented investment by the Government of Canada. The Agency’s Investment Plan 2015–16 to 2019–20 summarizes these planned investments and the concrete actions taken to position and prepare the Agency to deliver this substantial infrastructure rehabilitation program.

However, the Agency’s ability to maintain its built asset portfolio in accordance with industry standards, enabling program and service delivery for the long-term, remains a key risk for the Agency. The lack of funding required to maintain its more than 17,000 built assets puts the Agency at risk of not being able to fulfill its mandate. For example, this could inhibit the Agency’s ability to maintain its built heritage portfolio thereby risking the disappearance of significant and irreplaceable examples of Canada’s cultural heritage. Similarly, Parks Canada’s limited means to invest in aging visitor facilities, puts at risk the Agency’s ability to deliver and evolve Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians are able to experience their national parks and learn more about the environment and their heritage, not only today, but into the future.

Connecting With Canadians

There is a risk that failure by the Agency to adjust or respond to increased visitation in 2017 may result in negative visitor experiences and impact Canadians’ ability to meaningfully connect with their natural and cultural heritage. Parks Canada faces the challenge of welcoming an increased number of visitors from Canada 150 free admission and events. As well, changes in the economy, such as a decline in the exchange rate for the Canadian dollar, could expand domestic tourism. The Agency’s promotions, outreach, communications, and visitor experience offers targeting Canada’s changing population will also attract new audiences.

External Development Pressures

Parks Canada’s efforts to fulfill its responsibilities related to the ecological integrity of national parks, the ecologically sustainable use of national marine conservation areas and the commemorative integrity of national historic sites are influenced by external pressures such as increased urban and rural development, land conversion, resource extraction, and transportation and utilities corridors in proximity to existing or proposed heritage places. The impacts of these pressures include the loss or impairment of the ecological and cultural values of heritage places, impacts on species at risk and a diminished sense of connection to place.

As the most significant sources of these pressures originate from outside Parks Canada lands, collaboration with other federal departments, provinces and territories, Indigenous groups, industry, local communities, landowners and other stakeholders in the conservation of heritage places is essential to help the Agency fulfill its mandate.

Indigenous Peoples’ Reconciliation

Parks Canada’s actions towards reconciliation may not fully satisfy the rights and interests of Indigenous Peoples and other Canadians. Identified actions must be implemented in consultation and collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and be respectful of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report and specifically Call to Action 79. Furthermore, in anticipation of the significant efforts of the government to address reconciliation, Indigenous groups and communities may not possess sufficient resources to respond to the increase in requests for engagement and consultation. Parks Canada will be required to work with other federal departments to ensure that engagement and consultation is undertaken in a coordinated manner.

RisksRisk Response StrategyLink to the Department’s ProgramsLink to Mandate Letter Commitments or to Government wide and Departmental Priorities
Environmental Forces Adaptation and Response

The magnitude and rapid pace of environmental changes, including climate change may affect Parks Canada’s ability to maintain the integrity of its ecosystems, cultural resources and infrastructure.

The Agency is responding to this risk by:
  • undertaking applicable assessments, planning and monitoring to identify potential threats to or at heritage places, and taking action to mitigate those impacts, where possible;
  • undertaking ecological restoration projects focused on improving ecological integrity or advancing towards recovery targets for priority species at risk;
  • applying the lessons learned related to climate change adaptation acquired in Canada’s North to other national parks;
  • developing and sharing of best practices for monitoring condition of cultural resources in all protected heritage places;
  • continuing to implement measures to protect contemporary and built heritage assets such as using resilient designs and construction materials; and
  • continuing to review emergency and business continuity plans and providing Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training.

1.2 Heritage Places Conservation

1.4 Visitor Experience

1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

  • Government of Canada priority for a clean environment and sustainable economy (support)
  • Enhance protection of Canada’s endangered species by responding quickly to the advice of scientists and completing robust species-at-risk recovery plans in a timely way (support)
  • Help restore Canada’s reputation for environmental stewardship (support)
Built Asset Condition and Long-term Sustainability

There is a risk that the Agency will not be able to maintain the condition of its built asset portfolio to support the delivery of Parks Canada’s mandate.

The Agency is responding to this risk by:
  • finalizing a long-term sustainability plan based on current asset portfolio information and valuations;
  • advancing Parks Canada’s Strategic Asset Management Plan and associated priority initiatives that will aim to optimize life cycle costs associated with the ongoing operation, maintenance and renewal of the Agency’s asset portfolio; and
  • continuing to improve the corporate asset information system to ensure that comprehensive, accurate, and timely information on assets is available to support decision making at all levels of the organization.
1.2 Heritage Places Conservation

1.4 Visitor Experience

1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Internal Services

  • Develop Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians can experience our National Parks and learn more about our environment and heritage (lead)
Connecting With Canadians

There is a risk that failure by the Agency to adjust or respond to increased visitation in 2017 may result in negative visitor experience and impact Canadians’ ability to meaningfully connect with their natural and cultural heritage.

The Agency is responding to this risk by:
  • promoting less visited locations within popular heritage places and across the Parks Canada network, to better distribute rising visitation; and
  • continuing to strengthen quality visitor experience training to provide front-line staff with the tools needed to manage increased visitation in 2017.
1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

1.4 Visitor Experience

Internal Services

  • Make admission for all visitors to National Parks free in 2017, the 150th anniversary of Confederation (lead)
  • Through an expanded Learn to Camp Program, ensure that more low- and middle-income families have an opportunity to experience Canada’s outdoors (lead)
  • Develop Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians can experience our National Parks and learn more about our environment and heritage (lead)
  • Work with nearby communities to help grow local eco-tourism industries and create jobs (support)
External Development Pressures

Development pressures may affect Parks Canada’s ability to maintain the integrity of its ecosystems and cultural resources.

The Agency is responding to this risk by:
  • undertaking ecological restoration projects to build ecosystem resilience;
  • assessing impacts to cultural resources and implementing corrective mitigation measures;
  • strategic participation in existing external development related processes, including environmental assessments; and
  • engaging local and national authorities, and partner groups, where practicable, to reduce or eliminate the negative impacts of development projects pressures on the ecological or commemorative integrity of existing heritage places, when development occurs nearby or is adjacent to heritage places.
1.1 Heritage Places Establishment

1.2 Heritage Places Conservation

1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

1.4 Visitor Experience

  • Develop Canada’s National Parks system (lead)
  • Increase the proportion of Canada’s marine and coastal areas that are protected (support)
Indigenous Peoples’ Reconciliation

There is a risk that Parks Canada’s actions towards reconciliation may not fully satisfy both the rights and interests of Indigenous Peoples and other Canadians.

The Agency is responding to this risk by implementing a reconciliation framework composed of three pillars:
  • strengthening Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters in a manner that respects Aboriginal rights and treaty rights in all heritage places;
  • expanding presentation and commemoration of Indigenous histories and cultures in Parks Canada’s heritage places and programs, including responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report, Call to Action #79; and
  • increasing economic opportunities related to Indigenous tourism in heritage places and raising the profile of Indigenous tourism products across the network of heritage places.
1.1 Heritage Places Establishment

1.2 Heritage Places Conservation

1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

1.4 Visitor Experience

1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Internal Services

  • Commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples, based on recognition of rights, respect, cooperation, and partnership (support)

Planned Results: What We Want to Achieve This Year and Beyond

Programs

Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment

Description

This program aims to establish heritage places in order to conserve Canada’s natural and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations, thus fostering a strong sense of connection to our natural and cultural heritage. This program also supports Canada’s involvement in the internationally shared objective of protecting and commemorating the best of the world’s natural and cultural heritage. By establishing national parks and national marine conservation areas in each of Canada’s natural terrestrial and marine regions, this program ensures the protection and presentation of representative examples of Canada’s natural diversity. Likewise, the designation and commemoration of historic places, persons and events in communities across Canada ensures our history remains a living legacy for all Canadians. Establishment or designation is achieved through feasibility assessments, public nominations, research, consultation with Indigenous Peoples, stakeholders and the general public, negotiations with other governments and Indigenous organizations, recommendations from advisory bodies and fulfilment of legislative requirements. This process results in established national parks and national marine conservation areas and designated national historic sites, persons and events and other heritage places.

Planning Highlights
National Park and National Marine Conservation Area Establishment

Parks Canada is working to expand the national parks system, and to protect marine and coastal areas in national marine conservation areas as a contribution to the government’s commitment to protecting five percent of the marine environment by 2017, and 10 percent by 2020. A fundamental principle underscoring this work is the need to involve provincial and territorial governments and Indigenous Peoples in feasibility assessments and negotiation of national park and national marine conservation area establishment agreements.

In 2017, Parks Canada will confirm a final boundary and negotiate and sign the necessary establishment agreements with the Government of the Northwest Territories and Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation, and an Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Northwest Territories Métis Nation leading to the establishment, development and operation of a national park reserve in the Thaidene Nëné area located in the East Arm of the Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories. Parks Canada will also confirm and announce a final boundary and commencement of negotiations of an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Qikiqtani Inuit Association for a national marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound in Nunavut.

The Agency will also conclude existing and ongoing feasibility assessments for a proposed national park in the Interlake region of the Manitoba Lowlands natural region of the national parks system, and for proposed national marine conservation areas in the Southern Strait of Georgia area of British Columbia and the Magdalen Islands located offshore of Quebec. Lastly, the Agency will launch and support feasibility assessments for new proposals for national marine conservation areas in unrepresented marine regions including for a site in eastern James Bay that both Parks Canada and the Cree Nation Government agree would represent this region and form the basis of a cooperative management arrangement, and for a site in southern Hudson Bay.

Should the feasibility assessments for the proposed national park in Manitoba and the four unrepresented marine regions listed above prove successful, negotiation of the necessary establishment agreements would be the next step. Conversely, should any of these proposals falter, Parks Canada has the authority to invest in other sites that would contribute to the improved representation of terrestrial or marine regions.

Designation and Commemoration of Historic Places, Persons and Events

Parks Canada supports the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC) in its role to advise the Minister on the designation of historic places, people and events. Many of these designations have yet to be commemorated by means of a bronze plaque. To this end, Parks Canada has launched an ambitious initiative to unveil approximately 400 plaques over the next few years of which 150 will be unveiled in 2017 as part of the Canada 150 celebrations. This initiative will help Canadians, including new Canadians and youth, discover more about their communities’ history and Canada’s diverse heritage.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Parks Canada will do more to mark and present the historic achievements and contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The Agency is planning regional engagement with Indigenous partners in 2017 to set the stage to expand the presentation of Indigenous histories and cultures through the National Program of Historical Commemoration and to determine the most meaningful forms of commemoration. This will include working with Indigenous partners to develop and implement a national plan and strategy for commemorating residential school sites and increasing Indigenous representation on the HSMBC and within the Secretariat that supports the Board.

Parks Canada will also present Indigenous perspectives and voices through Stories of Canada, an innovative approach to improve how history is presented at heritage places with the goal of responding to demographic shifts in the population. Stories of Canada aims to encompass best practices in communicating compelling stories to modernize the way Canadians connect with their past. The Story of Confederation and the Story of Conservation, in line with this new approach, are currently under development and planned for release in 2017 as part of Canada 150 celebrations.

As a leader in conservation, Parks Canada will continue to manage a suite of heritage designation and protection programs that support other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, Indigenous groups and Canadian communities in commemorating and protecting heritage places such as lighthouses, railway stations, and Canadian rivers. These programs enhance the commemoration of important cultural and natural heritage resources that, taken together, illustrate our rich and diverse history.

As Canada’s representative to the World Heritage Committee, Parks Canada manages the process to update Canada’s Tentative List for UNESCO World Heritage Sites to identify future candidates for inscription on the World Heritage List. It is anticipated that up to 10 new sites will be added to Canada’s Tentative List in 2017. The Agency will also play a leadership role in the nominations of Pimachiowin Aki, Klondike/T’rondek, and Writing-on-Stone/Aisinai’pi for possible inscription at the World Heritage Committee meetings in 2018 and 2019.

Planned Results
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetDate to
Achieve
Target
2013-14
Actual
Results
2014-15
Actual
Results
2015-16
Actual
Results
The systems of national parks and national marine conservation areas are representative of Canada’s natural terrestrial and marine regions. Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks and national marine conservation areas. 4 By March 2018 7
(Target: 3 by March 2014)
5
(Target: 3 by March 2015)
6
(Target: 4 by March 2016)
Heritage places, persons and events are considered for national or international designation. Percentage of eligible heritage places, persons, and events reviewed annually for designation. 95% Annually n/a* n/a* 100%
*New performance indicator implemented in 2015–16.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
12,574,855 12,574,855 10,910,165 13,743,275
The decrease in planned spending from 2017–18 to 2018–19 is primarily due to a one-time planned spending item in 2017–18 related to the ongoing work to expand the Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve. The increase in 2019–20 is primarily due to planned spending in regards to land transfers for Rouge National Urban Park.

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
39 39 39

Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation

Description

This program aims to protect and conserve the natural and cultural resources of all heritage places managed by Parks Canada, as well as the agricultural resources in the national urban park; and to fulfill responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada or mandated through federal legislation. Protection and conservation activities in a national urban park, national parks, national marine conservation areas, heritage canals and Parks Canada-administered national historic sites ensure that these heritage places are maintained and used in ways that leave them unimpaired for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Planning Highlights
Natural Heritage Conservation

The Agency’s performance in 2015–16 in maintaining or improving 90 percent of the ecosystems in national parks was the result of scientific analysis, evidence-based management and engaging Canadians in the work of conservation. In 2017–18, Parks Canada will continue to monitor the ecological state of national park ecosystems, to restore damaged ecosystems and recover species at risk on a priority basis through the national Conservation and Restoration Program and other park-based initiatives. A particular focus for the Agency will be to mitigate significant environmental impacts to park ecosystems due to increased visitation arising from Canada 150 celebrations or the implementation of infrastructure projects. Parks Canada’s law enforcement program makes a significant contribution to the maintenance and restoration of ecological integrity. Park wardens will continue to undertake prevention and law enforcement activities to protect wildlife and ecosystems and contribute to on-the-ground restoration efforts.

Pathway to Canada Target 1

By 2020, at least 17 percent of terrestrial areas and inland water, and 10 percent of coastal and marine areas, are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

Alberta Parks and Parks Canada are co-leading the terrestrial areas component of this biodiversity target. Much of the progress is expected to come from beyond the traditional protected area networks including Indigenous Conservation Areas, industry-supported efforts and private stewardship.

With partners, Parks Canada will aim to increase its ability to identify potential cumulative effects, track their impacts and use best mana gement practices to contain them.

In 2017–18, the Agency will continue to work with other federal departments, Indigenous Peoples and stakeholders on policy to govern national marine conservation areas, which will contribute to meeting Canada’s targets for marine conservation. Parks Canada will also continue to work on piloting a national monitoring program which will enable the Agency to better understand the state of the national marine conservation area system and more effectively manage these areas.

Parks Canada is committed to meeting its performance target of maintaining or improving park and marine ecosystems through these initiatives and by applying the full range of protection activities from gaining knowledge (both scientific and Indigenous), to improved public information, creative engagement with Indigenous Peoples and stakeholders, and respectful enforcement of the law.

Cultural Heritage Conservation

Once a piece of our history is gone, it is gone forever, which is why the protection of cultural resources requires constant vigilance. Parks Canada undertakes regular assessment and monitoring of the condition of cultural resources and will continue this important exercise by undertaking commemorative integrity assessments, which evaluate the extent to which a national historic site retains its heritage value. Parks Canada will also continue to identify and monitor threats related to climate change, such as shoreline erosion, and develop best practices, along with mitigation and adaptation measures.

The Government of Canada is investing an additional $20 million over two years in Parks Canada’s National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places. This increased financial assistance will support the protection and presentation of nationally recognized heritage places not administered by the federal government, while strengthening the tourism sector and supporting the economy.

As part of the federal infrastructure funding, Parks Canada will continue its investment to improve the condition of cultural resources of national significance at its heritage places such as Carleton Martello Tower, Lower Fort Garry and Fort Rodd Hill national historic sites. In addition, Parks Canada’s cultural heritage professionals (archaeologists, built heritage advisors and other experts) will continue to support the protection of cultural resources in infrastructure investment projects. This work includes the completion of cultural resource impact analyses to identify and mitigate potential threats to cultural resources.

Parks Canada is responsible for one of the largest collections of historical and archaeological objects in North America and will undertake various actions to better protect the heritage value of these cultural resources. Parks Canada is developing a strategy for preventive conservation, a cost-effective, evidence-based and sustainable approach to identify and reduce potential hazards to cultural resources.

Preserving information related to cultural resources under Parks Canada’s care is also essential for their protection and presentation. In 2017–18, Parks Canada will advance the development of a single database to bring together critical information relating to cultural resources to facilitate evidence-based decision making, reporting and presentation.

Parks Canada also supports the conservation of cultural heritage under the responsibility of other government departments through the Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office. The Agency will continue to work closely with custodian departments to complete an increased number of reviews of interventions as a result of the many federal infrastructure projects currently underway across the government.

Parks Canada will also continue to respond in a timely fashion to the World Heritage Centre for State of Conservation reports concerning the status of Canadian World Heritage sites.

Planned Results
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetDate to
Achieve
Target
2013-14
Actual
Results
2014-15
Actual
Results
2015-16
Actual
Results
National park and national marine area conservation is maintained or improved. Percentage of indicators in national park monitoring plans for which condition is maintained or improved. 90% Annually n/a* n/a* 90%
Cultural resources of national significance at targeted heritage places are maintained or improved. Number of targeted heritage places where cultural resources of national significance are maintained or improved. 137 By March 2018 n/a** 55
(Target: 55 by March 2015)
44
(Target was 60 by March 2018)
Condition of heritage assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% By March 2020 n/a* n/a* 14%
(On track)
*New performance indicator implemented in 2015–16.
**New performance indicator implemented in 2014–15.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
219,566,624 219,566,624 202,358,026 181,708,195
Parks Canada is investing more than $3 billion over five years to improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage buildings and structures. The variation in planned spending reflects the nature and timing of infrastructure projects to address the loss of irreplaceable built heritage of national significance.

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
920 913 913

Program 1.3: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

Description

This program aims to nurture a sense of pride in and support for Parks Canada-administered places by increasing Canadians’ awareness, appreciation of their value and the various ways to experience them. This is achieved through relevant and effective heritage places promotion initiatives delivered to Canadians, reaching them in their daily lives. Some of these promotion activities are done in collaboration with stakeholders and partners to reach and engage more Canadians.

Planning Highlights

The eighth Minister’s Round Table on Parks Canada was held from January 9 to 27, 2017. It was the largest and most inclusive round table to advise the Minister on the work of Parks Canada ever conducted and empowered all Canadians interested in their national parks, national historic sites, and national marine conservation areas to share their views and perspectives with the government. The Minister will respond to the outcomes of the engagement by Summer 2017.

In 2017, Parks Canada’s promotional efforts will be focused on encouraging Canadians to learn more about their entire network of national protected places. The Agency will encourage Canadians to seek out lesser-known parks and historic sites, enjoy little known hidden gems in its more popular places, and explore shoulder season experiences in spring and fall. Promotions will also encourage advance trip planning and strengthen awareness of safe ways to enjoy natural spaces and historic places.

Also in 2017, Parks Canada will launch an improved website and a new mobile app designed to help new visitors learn about their national parks and historic sites, plan their trip, and share their experiences and memories with others.

Engagement and promotion activities will focus on target markets to showcase iconic locations, experiences and learning opportunities by bringing together market intelligence, product development and promotions, which in turn will help support increased visitation and satisfaction. The Agency will continue to work with partners to increase reach through broadcasting, mass media, social media, and presence at partner venues and key events in major urban centres, including consumer trade shows, festivals and collaborative events with major attractions and cultural institutions. Parks Canada’s web presence will be improved and enhanced with the goal of making it easier for visitors to interact with online content, plan their visit, and learn about Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Parks Canada will aim to increase its profile by leveraging event and promotion opportunities such as anniversaries and celebrations, including celebrations of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation and the 100th anniversary of national historic sites. Individual Canadians and Canadian organizations will be encouraged to become more involved through these celebrations and enhanced volunteer opportunities.

A strategic focus on youth and youth engagement programs, such as The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Youth Ambassador Program, Canada’s Coolest School Trip Contest and the post-secondary Campus Club Network, Students on Ice Program and partnerships with youth organizations will continue to support experience and learning about Canada’s history and natural treasures among this important target audience. The successful My Parks Pass program will be transformed to ensure it remains relevant as free admission will be offered to children under 18 years of age as of 2018.

Parks Canada will continue to develop national strategic partnerships for targeted collaborative activities including program delivery, promotional campaigns, contests, scientific and academic research, learning tools and products and experiences.

Planned Results
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetDate to
Achieve
Target
2013-14
Actual
Results
2014-15
Actual
Results
2015-16
Actual
Results
Canadians support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada. Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada. 80% By March 2018 n/a* n/a** n/a**
As part of Canada 150 celebrations, Canadians will experience and connect with Parks Canada’s administered places through outreach and multimedia initiatives. Increase the reach of Parks Canada’s administered places. 10% By March 2018 n/a*** n/a*** n/a***
*Not a comparable result as new methodology implemented in 2014.
**New methodology implemented in 2014. Results will be available in 2018 when the next National Survey of Canadians is scheduled.
***New performance indicator implemented in 2017–18.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
42,921,405 42,921,405 41,272,778 41,293,450


Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
349 348 348

Program 1.4: Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites administered by Parks Canada, national marine conservation areas, and heritage canals. This program includes a range of activities, services and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation, recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities. The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement.

Planning Highlights

In 2017, Parks Canada will continue to test new approaches to overnight accommodation at Parks Canada places. The Agency’s oTENTik program, which offers soft-walled family accommodation at national parks and historic sites across the country has enjoyed considerable success. However, many couples and target markets such as youth and urban Canadians are seeking interesting and unique accommodation offerings designed for two. Throughout 2017, Parks Canada will test a number of innovative new overnight accommodation offers tailored to the needs and interests of these visitors. The Agency will review the results and assess whether the development of more variety in overnight accommodations will increase the enjoyment of Parks Canada places for these audiences.

Parks Canada places will play a key role in the celebrations to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017. As part of these celebrations, admission to Parks Canada places will be free. Parks Canada will also participate in planned Government of Canada activities to celebrate Canada 150 by hosting signature events at select sites.

In 2017, Parks Canada will also prepare for free admission to Parks Canada places for all visitors under the age of 18, beginning in 2018. By providing free entry to youth, the government is helping to create a future generation of stewards of our country’s greatest heritage treasures.

To further engage new Canadians, Parks Canada will continue its partnership with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship, whereby new Canadian citizens are offered complimentary admission to Parks Canada’s destinations for one year through the Institute’s Cultural Access Pass. This initiative will help to strengthen the connection of new citizens to their country’s natural and cultural heritage.

The popular Learn to Camp Program will also be enhanced to ensure that more Canadian families, urban Canadians, and youth can acquire the skills, knowledge, and confidence to experience Canada’s outdoors and develop personal connections with Canada’s natural heritage. In 2017, Parks Canada will host 30 overnight learn-to-camp events as well as new outreach events, half- and full-day learn-to-camp programs and other activities to help get Canadians outdoors.

To encourage more Canadians, including youth and newcomers, to experience the outdoors and learn about our history, Parks Canada will continue to innovate, expand and diversify the range of programs and services available at its heritage places. Parks Canada will diversify its accommodation offer, develop new technology-based interpretive programs that encourage exploration of the heritage place, and improve online planning tools and reservation capabilities to support trip planning.

In addition, the Agency will implement a strategy to improve collaboration with Indigenous Peoples, communities and businesses in offering a greater number of Indigenous tourism experiences at Parks Canada places.

As part of a federal infrastructure plan, Parks Canada will continue to renew visitor infrastructure such as trails, day-use areas, campgrounds and visitor centres to ensure the quality and reliability of visitor offers, and to respond to changing demands and needs of Canadians. Projects include improvements to camping facilities in La Mauricie, Jasper and Bruce Peninsula national parks and visitor experience assets in Fort Walsh, Fort George, Fortress of Louisbourg and Lachine Canal national historic sites.

Planned Results
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetDate to
Achieve
Target
2013-14
Actual
Results
2014-15
Actual
Results
2015-16
Actual
Results
As part of Canada 150 celebrations, Canadians and international visitors visit and experience Parks Canada's administered places and visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of connection to these places. Increase in the number of visits at Parks Canada administered places. 2% Annually 20.7 million
(Target 22.4 million person-visits)
5% 7%
Average percentage of visitors that consider the place is meaningful to them. 85% Annually 84% 80% 82%
Average percentage of visitors that are satisfied with their visit. 90% Annually 94% 95% 95%
Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. 90% Annually 94% 95% 93%
Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the heritage place. 60% Annually 79% 75% 73%
Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the national historic site. 85% Annually 91% 93% 95%
Condition of visitor experience assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% By March 2020 n/a* n/a* 11%
(On track)
*New performance indicator implemented in 2015–16.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
526,736,042 526,736,042 487,697,643 462,224,297
Parks Canada is investing more than $3 billion over five years to improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage buildings and structures. The variation in planned spending reflects the nature and timing of infrastructure projects to renew visitor facilities.

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2,210 2,151 2,147

Program 1.5: Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Description

This program involves the management of infrastructure for Canadians and provides opportunities for socio-economic benefits to adjacent communities. It is related to the operation, maintenance and improvement of the Trans-Canada and provincially numbered highwaysxiii within national parks and a national historic site; the water management of certain heritage canals; and, the provision of municipal services to certain national park townsites.ix

Planning Highlights

Parks Canada’s Investment Plan for 2015-16 to 2019-20 of over $3 billion represents an unprecedented program of work that will improve the condition of Parks Canada’s built asset portfolio and reduce risk to public safety across its network of heritage places. This investment demonstrates the government’s responsible stewardship of Canada’s protected places.

During this planning period, the Agency will continue implementing federal infrastructure projects to address deferred work and improve the condition of townsite assets, and highway and canal infrastructure. Projects include improvements to highways that pass through Cape Breton Highlands and Gros Morne national parks, as well as to bridges in Yoho National Park. Other projects include work on the water and wastewater facilities in the Lake Louise townsite, and dams on the Rideau Canal and Trent-Severn Waterway national historic sites. These investments will improve the safety and reliability of the infrastructure in townsites, highways and waterways and facilitate higher quality experiences for Canadians and visitors. In undertaking this work, Parks Canada will ensure that all potential impacts to natural and cultural resources are identified by conducting environmental assessments and cultural resource impact analyses to mitigate any potential adverse effects that may result from this work.

Planned Results
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetDate to
Achieve
Target
2013-14
Actual
Results
2014-15
Actual
Results
2015-16
Actual
Results
Condition of heritage canal, highway and townsite assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% By March 2020 n/a* 27%
(Target: 10% by March 2016)
28%
(On track)
*New performance indicator implemented in 2014–15.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
436,520,130 436,520,130 368,145,135 468,543,048
Parks Canada is investing more than $3 billion over five years to improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage buildings and structures. The variation in planned spending reflects the nature and timing of infrastructure projects to address deferred work and improve the condition of townsite assets, highways that pass through heritage places and canal infrastructure.

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
318 317 318

Information on the Parks Canada’s lower-level programs is available on the Parks Canada’s websitex and in the TBS InfoBase.xi

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning Highlights

Management and Oversight Services

Parks Canada will continue to enhance the functionality of its national asset information system to further improve the completeness and quality of built asset information, reporting capabilities and ensure the application of consistent asset management practices across the Agency. System improvements will result in the Agency’s ability to produce asset maintenance and condition information in real-time for the entire built asset inventory, therefore, further improving the Agency’s ability to plan and prioritize investment projects as well as operational and maintenance activities.

Parks Canada’s Investment Plan will be updated and implemented. The plan provides strategic-level information related to the governance, planning, and management of its assets, acquired services and projects, and summarizes planned investments for the five-year period from 2015–16 to 2019-20 in support of corporate priorities. The plan also sets out organizational changes undertaken to strengthen accountability for investment planning and project delivery, processes introduced to streamline operations and maximize efficiency, as well as systems implemented to support timely and accurate monitoring and reporting on investments.

Parks Canada will continue to implement a project management office aimed at strengthening national project management practices, processes and controls, and supporting the delivery of investment projects on time, on budget and with prudence and probity.

Human Resources Management Services

Parks Canada will continue to enhance its human resources service delivery model with the introduction of innovative staffing flexibilities and expanded automated capabilities (E-Services) for streamlining hiring processes, to support the Agency in delivering on the Canada 150 priority. These enhancements will also allow for increased student hiring in support of the government’s Youth Engagement Strategy.

The Agency will continue the development of an Agency-wide people management strategy aligned with current and future strategic, operational and overall government priorities. As well, performance and talent management, competencies and learning strategies will be developed to ensure we have the right talent in the right place at the right time. To support this work, government-wide modernization initiatives (e.g., pay transformation, My GCHR) and reporting functionalities, such as the People Management Dashboard will be leveraged to support the Agency in people management excellence.

Parks Canada will continue to foster a supportive, trusting and respectful work environment requiring the active participation of all employees. A workplace wellness strategy will be developed in the coming year to provide a framework for ongoing corporate initiatives, such as the Healthy and Respectful Workplace Innovation Labs, currently underway, as well as the Agency’s participation in the Public Service Employee Survey 2017–18.

Financial Management Services

Parks Canada will review the current service delivery model to foster an enterprise approach to financial management, and achieve increased consistency and standardization in services across the Agency, by providing leadership and support in all aspects of the Agency’s financial matters.

Information Management Services

Parks Canada will place a focus on effective management and sharing of information through the implementation of modernized information management and data governance strategies and the piloting of GCDOCS, a government-wide solution for records and documents management. It will also implement an Open Government data strategy to demonstrate greater transparency and accountability to Canadians.

Parks Canada will continue to provide Canadians with timely, accurate, open and relevant performance information related to progress against Government of Canada and Agency priorities.

Information Technology Services

Parks Canada will take concrete steps to address its aging IT infrastructure by working with Shared Services Canada to move to the data centre and refresh mission critical infrastructure at the regional data centres. The Agency will also make strategic investments to increase its network capacity as well as develop an Agency-wide connectivity plan. These investments will permit the Agency to leverage new tools and technologies that require broadband access. The Agency will deploy new, enabling office productivity tools to its team members that will leverage the investments made in connectivity, the data centre move and the regional infrastructure refresh.

Real Property Services

A review and modernization of Parks Canada’s commercial leasing program is being initiated in 2017 to identify and implement a fair market value model for commercial leases administered by Parks Canada. The Agency will also continue modernizing its Real Property Framework to ensure a consistent approach to the management of real property, business licensing, special event permitting and staff housing.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
150,584,014 150,584,014 146,855,208 144,522,638


Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2017-18
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2018-19
Planned Full-time Equivalents
2019-20
Planned Full-time Equivalents
1,073 1,072 1,072

Spending and Human Resources

Planned Spending

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

This graph demonstrates data of the Actual and Planned Spending for Parks Canada. A table with data from this graph follows

[Text Version]

Budgetary Planning Summary for Programs and Internal Services (Dollars)
Programs and Internal Services2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Expenditures
2016-17
Forecast Spending
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
1.1 Heritage Places Establishment 21,199,396 17,719,496 18,301,120 12,574,855 12,574,855 10,910,165 13,743,275
1.2 Heritage Places Conservation 137,267,951 163,462,332 200,637,860 219,566,624 219,566,624 202,358,026 181,708,195
1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support 42,872,689 40,743,143 50,563,713 42,921,405 42,921,405 41,272,778 41,293,450
1.4 Visitor Experience 291,314,470 400,413,772 521,850,164 526,736,042 526,736,042 487,697,643 462,224,297
1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management 136,302,253 272,412,103 342,549,586 436,520,130 436,520,130 368,145,135 468,543,048
Subtotal 628,956,759 894,750,846 1,133,902,443 1,238,319,056 1,238,319,056 1,110,383,747 1,167,512,265
Internal Services 92,843,101 141,379,561 149,008,623 150,584,014 150,584,014 146,855,208 144,522,638
Total 721,799,860 1,036,130,407 1,282,911,066 1,388,903,070 1,388,903,070 1,257,238,955 1,312,034,903

For fiscal years 2014–15 and 2015–16, the amounts represent the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For the fiscal year 2016–17, the amounts represent the forecast spending which includes planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Main and Supplementary Estimates.

For the period 2017–18 to 2019–20, planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the Agency’s Strategic Outcome and Programs.

The trend of increased spending is primarily due to Parks Canada investing more than $3 billion over five years in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas to address the backlog of deferred work and improve the condition of assets administered by the Agency. Parks Canada also received significant funding in 2016–17 and 2017–18 to invest in the Trans-Canada Highway in Yoho National Park and the Icefields Parkway Trail in Jasper National Park.

The reduction in statutory estimates in 2017–18 is due to the implementation of free admission to Parks Canada places for all visitors in 2017. This reduction is offset by a corresponding increase in voted authorities in 2017–18.

Planned Human Resources

Human Resources Planning Summary for Programs and Internal Services
(Full-time Equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services2014-15
Full-time Equivalents
2015-16
Full-time Equivalents
2016-17
Forecast
Full-time Equivalents
2017-18
Planned
Full-time Equivalents
2018-19 Planned
Full-time Equivalents
2019-20 Planned
Full-time Equivalents
1.1 Heritage Places Establishment 60 50 47 39 39 39
1.2 Heritage Places Conservation 875 873 927 920 913 913
1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support 355 335 362 349 348 348
1.4 Visitor Experience 2,070 2,064 2,190 2,210 2,151 2,147
1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management 293 291 321 318 317 318
Subtotal 3,653 3,613 3,847 3,836 3,768 3,765
Internal Services 571 1,030 1,089 1,073 1,072 1,072
Total 4,224 4,643 4,936 4,909 4,840 4,837

The trend of increased full-time equivalents is primarily due to Parks Canada investing more than $3 billion over five years in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas to address the backlog of deferred work and improve the condition of assets administered by the Agency. There is also a one-time increase in full-time equivalents in 2016–17 due to the hiring of additional summer students as part of the Young Canada Works program.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Parks Canada’s organizational appropriations consult the 2017–18 Main Estimates.xii

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Parks Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Parks Canada’s website.xiii

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2018 (Dollars)
Financial Information2016-17
Forecast Results
2017-18
Planned Results
Difference
(2017-18 Planned Results
Minus 2016-17 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 724,075,000 715,295,000 (8,780,000)
Total revenues 123,000,000 81,000,000 (42,000,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 601,075,000 634,295,000 33,220,000

Expenses for 2017–18 are planned at $715 million ($724 million in 2016–17). The difference of $9 million can be explained by a decrease in expenses due to shifts in spending towards asset betterments that are capitalized, rather than asset maintenance that is expensed.

Revenues for 2017–18 are planned at $81 million ($123 million in 2016–17). The difference of $42 million can be explained by a decrease in revenues due to free admission to all Parks Canada places in 2017.


Supplementary Information

Corporate Information

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Daniel Watson, Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial Portfolio: Environment and Climate Change Canada

Enabling Instruments:

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1998

Reporting Framework

Parks Canada’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017–18 appears below:

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

  • 1.1 Program: Heritage Places Establishment
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: National Park Establishment
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Area Establishment
    • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: National Historic Site Designation
    • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Other Heritage Places Designation

  • 1.2 Program: Heritage Places Conservation
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: National Park Conservation
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: National Urban Park Conservation
    • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: National Marine Area Conservation
    • 1.2.4 Sub-Program: National Historic Site Conservation
    • 1.2.5 Sub-Program: Other Heritage Places Conservation

  • 1.3 Program: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
    • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Heritage Places Promotion
    • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Partnering and Participation

  • 1.4 Program: Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.1 Sub-Program: National Park Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.2 Sub-Program: National Urban Park Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.3 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Area Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.4 Sub-Program: National Historic Site Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.5 Sub-Program: Heritage Canal Visitor Experience

  • 1.5 Program: Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management
    • 1.5.1 Sub-Program: Townsite Management
    • 1.5.2 Sub-Program: Highway Management
    • 1.5.3 Sub-Program: Heritage Canal Management

  • Internal Services

Supporting Information on Lower-level Programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Parks Canada websitexxiv and in the TBS InfoBase.xxv

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Parks Canada website.xxvi

  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million
  • Upcoming evaluations over the next five fiscal years
  • Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year
  • User fees and regulatory charges

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.xxvii This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Parks Canada National Office

30 Victoria Street Gatineau, Quebec Canada J8X 0B3

General Inquiries

888-773-8888

General Inquiries (International)

819-420-9486

Teletypewriter (TTY)

866-787-6221

Website: www.parkscanada.gc.ca

Email: information@pc.gc.ca


Appendix A: Definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (Résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (Cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work towards achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (Architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.


Endnotes

i Definition of Ecological Integrity, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/np-pn/ie-ei.aspx; Definition of Commemorative Integrity, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/pc/guide/guide/commemorative_1_0/commemorative_1_1.aspx

ii The System of National Parks of Canada, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/np-pn/cnpn-cnnp/index/carte-map.aspx

iii Rouge National Urban Park, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/on/rouge/index.aspx

iv The System of National Marine Conservation Areas of Canada, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/amnc-nmca/cnamnc-cnnmca/index/carte-map.aspx

v Heritage canals include the Trent-Severn Waterway, the Rideau and Sault-Ste.-Marie canals in Ontario, the Carillon, Chambly, Lachine, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue and Saint-Ours canals in Quebec, and the St. Peters Canal in Nova Scotia.

vi Parks Canada website, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/index.aspx

vii The Minister’s mandate letter, http://pm.gc.ca/eng/mandate-letters

viii Highways managed by Parks Canada consist of 1,151 two-lane kilometres of highways, including 360 two-lane kilometres of the Trans-Canada Highway through Banff, Yoho, Glacier, Mount Revelstoke and Terra Nova national parks, 791 two-lane kilometres of highways through eight provinces and one territory, including the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island, and 235 highway bridges.

ix Townsite communities include Field in Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Alberta, Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta. Two other townsites, Banff and Jasper, are self-governed since 1990 and 2002 respectively. Parks Canada retains authority for community plans and by-laws in Banff, and for community plans, land-use planning and development in Jasper.

x Supporting Information on Lower-level Programs, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/pc/plans/rpp/rpp2017-18/index.aspx#supporting-information-lower-level-programs

xi TBS InfoBase, https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/edb-bdd/index-eng.html#start

xii 2017-18 Main Estimates, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hgw-cgf/finances/pgs-pdg/gepme-pdgbpd/index-eng.asp

xiii Parks Canada Agency’s Future-Oriented Statement of Operations, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/agen/dp-pd/dp-pd.aspx

xiv Parks Canada Agency Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-0.4/

xv Canada National Parks Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-14.01/

xvi Rouge National Urban Park Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/annualstatutes/2015_10/page-1.html

xvii Historic Sites and Monuments Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-4/

xviii Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-7.3/index.html

xix Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-1.3/index.html

xx Historic Canal Regulations, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/sor-93-220/

xxi Heritage Railway Stations Protection Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3.5/

xxii Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3.4/

xxiii Species at Risk Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-15.3/

xxiv Supporting Information on Lower-level Programs, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/pc/plans/rpp/rpp2017-18/sec09/llp-pni_e.aspx

xxv TBS InfoBase, https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/edb-bdd/index-eng.html#start

xxvi Supplementary Information Tables, http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/pc/plans/rpp/rpp2017-18/sec09/ts-st.aspx

xxvii Report on Federal Tax Expenditures, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp