Economic Impact of Parks Canada

Executive Summary


Download a printable version of the report (PDF 1.3 MB)

Parks Canada makes a substantial economic contribution to Canada’s economy.  Through the spending of the organization and the visitors to Parks Canada’s National Parks, National Historic Sites and National Marine Conservation Areas, a significant and widespread economic impact is felt throughout the country.

In 2008/09 Parks Canada’s organizational spending and visitor spending totalled $3.3 billion.  Of this amount, visitor spending accounted for $2.7 billion and $587 million was spent by Parks Canada on the three program areas.  The overall national economic impacts derived from the spending attributed to Parks Canada on the Canadian economy are:

Gross Domestic Product      $2,988 million
Labour Income                    $1,925 million
Employment                         41,720 fulltime equivalents
Tax Revenue                        $218 million

National impacts by program area in 2008/09 were:

Parks Canada Program

Economic Impact

Gross Domestic Product (millions)

Labour Income (millions)

Employment (FTE)

Tax Revenue
(millions)

National Parks

$2,405.0

$1,518.4

32,757.7

$161.7

National Historic Sites

$440.1

$317.7

6,660.2

$45.6

National Marine Conservation Areas

 

$142.7

 

$88.9

 

2,302.3

 

$10.6

     TOTAL

$2,987.8

$1,925.0

41,720.2

$217.9

With visitors accounting for 81.8% of total spending, it is reasonable to expect visitor spending to have the greater impact.  In fact, visitor spending generates 75.5% of the GDP impacts; 75.8% of employment impacts and 62.5% of the tax impact.

Spending by non-Canadian visitors to Parks Canada locations – $1.2 billion – represents 45% of all visitor spending.  The impacts generated by this non-Canadian visitor spending contributes to Canada’s balance of international payments and creates a GDP impact nationally of $967 million and adds $57.5 million to tax revenues.


 

Note: To read the PDF version you need Adobe Acrobat Reader on your system.

If the Adobe download site is not accessible to you, you can download Acrobat Reader from an accessible page.

If you choose not to use Acrobat Reader you can have the PDF file converted to HTML or ASCII text by using one of the conversion services offered by Adobe.