Aboriginal Affairs Secretariat (AAS)

Working Together: Our Stories

Best Practices and Lessons Learned in Aboriginal Engagement

Parks Canada wishes to acknowledge and thank the many Aboriginal partners and communities that it is fortunate to work with for their generous contribution and collaboration.

Métis Interpreter Bev Weber explaining traditional Métis art to Jaylyn Anderson (4 yrs old). Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site of Canada Métis Interpreter Bev Weber explaining traditional Métis art to Jaylyn Anderson (4 yrs old). Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site of Canada
© Parks Canada
Qapik Attagutsiak being interviewed by her daughter, Parks Canada staff Kataisee Attagutsiak. Workshop on Places of Ecological and Cultural Significance for Sirmilik National Park of Canada, Borden Peninsula, Nunavut Qapik Attagutsiak being interviewed by her daughter, Parks Canada staff Kataisee Attagutsiak. Workshop on Places of Ecological and Cultural Significance for Sirmilik National Park of Canada, Borden Peninsula, Nunavut.
© Parks Canada / Micheline Manseau
Craig Benoit of Miawpukek First Nation explains the defining features of Boreal Felt Lichen to Terra Nova National Park of Canada staff Janet Feltham and Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada staff Kirby Tulk Craig Benoit of Miawpukek First Nation explains the defining features of Boreal Felt Lichen to Terra Nova National Park of Canada staff Janet Feltham and Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada staff Kirby Tulk.
© Parks Canada / Robin Tulk

Compiled by:
Aboriginal Affairs Secretariat
Parks Canada Agency
Gatineau, Quebec

NO. CAT. R62-419/2011
ISBN 978-1-100-53286-8

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Chief Executive Officer of Parks Canada Agency, 2011