The landscape and wildlife of the 18,890 sq km national park is seen by those privileged few willing to travel 170 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle. The landscape features rolling hills, three major rivers, steep canyons, waterfalls, rare Bluenose west caribou and the continent’s fiercest predators.

Getting here

PO Box 91
Paulatuk NT X0E 1N0

Hours of operation

Open year-round
Visitor services are available, from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm

Fees

Free admission in 2017. Other fees still apply.
Detailed fees list

Contact us

Telephone: 867-580-3233
Email: Inuvik.info@pc.gc.ca

Discover Parks Canada in 2018!

Parks Canada invites families to explore Canada’s most amazing destinations. Youth admission will be free starting January 2018. Save 20% on Family/Group passes until December 31, 2017.

Order your 2018 Discovery Pass

Sites nearby

  • Pingo Canadian Landmark

    Pingo Canadian Landmark protects a unique arctic landform: ice-cored hills called pingos. Rising out of the flat tundra, these hills provide a distinctive backdrop to the community of Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories.

  • Ivvavik National Park

    Rafters from around the world meet up in Ivvavik National Park. The Firth River slices through canyons and mountain valleys to the Arctic Ocean.  A fly-in base camp offers hikers access to an Arctic landscape of tors, peaks and rolling hills untouched by the last Ice Age. 

  • Aulavik National Park

    Located in Canada’s Northwest Territories, Aulavik is among the country’s most remote national parks. But it rewards adventurers with untouched tundra, pristine rivers, archaeological sites and ample wildlife, from muskoxen to seals and other marine mammals.

  • Saoyú-ʔehdacho National Historic Site

    Saoyú-Ɂehdacho National Historic Site celebrates the traditional lifestyles of the Sahtúgot’įnę – “the people of the Sahtú.” Visitors to Canada’s largest National Historic Site learn about the teaching, healing and spiritual places as conveyed through oral history.