There are plenty of safe places to walk and snowshoe at Lake Louise. But not all sign-posted destinations are safe for travel. Some trails pass through dangerous avalanche terrain from November to June. Watch for the signs below and never enter avalanche terrain without a beacon, probe, shovel and avalanche training. Get outside, have fun and be safe!

Stop here | Learn moreWhere to go | Trail report

Plain of Six Glaciers | Lake Agnes and Mirror Lake | Saddleback Pass | Louise Falls


Stop here

Avalanche warning sign If you see this sign, you are about to enter avalanche terrain. © Parks Canada

Avalanches are possible from November until June and you could be buried or injured. If you see this sign, you are about to enter avalanche terrain. Do not proceed unless you have avalanche training and a transceiver, probe and shovel.

There are often tracks beyond these signs left by equipped parties – this does not indicate that the trail is safe.

 

 


Avalanche zones at Lake Louise

Avalanche zones on Mt. Fairview at Lake Louise Watch for this avalanche zone on Mt. Fairview on the left side of Lake Louise past the boat house. © Parks Canada

Mount Fairview

Left side of Lake Louise
November to June annually

Watch for this avalanche zone on Mt. Fairview on the left side of Lake Louise past the boat house. It may also be accessed beyond the Fairview Lookout. This is an impressive natural feature but please enjoy it from afar.

For your safety and the safety of others, do not stand under this slide path or walk across it. 

 


The “Teahouse” Trails

Map of avalanche zones on the Avalanche hazards on the "Teahouse" Trails at Lake Louise © Parks Canada

Plain of Six Glaciers & Lake Agnes including Mirror Lake
November to June annually

These very popular summer hikes are not safe for travel in the winter unless you have avalanche training and equipment.

The avalanche zones on both trails are clearly marked. Keep in mind that tracks left by others do not mean that the trail is safe. You don’t know how informed previous travellers were or what the conditions may have been at the time. Note: The teahouses are closed in winter. When trails begin to clear in May check the trail report for current conditions. Your safety is your responsibility.  

 


Saddleback Pass

November to June annually

Watch for a marked avalanche zone on the trail to Saddleback Pass. This trail climbs the southeast flank of Mount Fairview and crosses a prominent avalanche slide path along the way. The avalanche zone is clearly marked. Do not enter it without avalanche training and equipment.

Keep in mind that tracks left by others do not mean that the trail is safe. You don’t know how informed previous travellers were or what the conditions may have been at the time. Your safety is your responsibility.


Louise Falls

Ice climbers on Louise Falls at the back of Lake Louise.
A frozen Louise Falls at the back of Lake Louise © Parks Canada

This impressive waterfall is clearly visible from the Lake Louise Lakeshore trail at the back of the lake. The waterfall freezes in the winter and is a popular ice climbing destination. Enjoy the view but please avoid standing directly under Louise Falls, especially in the spring. Falling ice can be a hazard at this location.


Learn how to travel safely in avalanche country

Many excellent programs exist to help you learn to travel safely in avalanche country. Visit Avalanche Canada for a list of programs and an online introductory primer.

Get outside, have fun and be safe!