Entering the former residence of two of Canada’s most important Prime Ministers is like stepping into the inner sanctum of our country’s political history. For over fifty years this Second Empire mansion in downtown Ottawa was at the heart of Canadian political life, serving as the residence of both Sir Wilfrid Laurier and the Rt. Hon. William Lyon Mackenzie King. Here they entertained dignitaries and politicians while often conducting the business of state.

Featured things to do

Live History Theatre – A Séance in Time

Join King, his medium, his military adviser, and his household staff as they prepare to contact the other side during a harvest moon séance.

Guided tours: Two Prime Ministers, One Home

Take a guided tour of the opulent former residence of two prime ministers of Canada: Sir Wilfrid Laurier and William Lyon Mackenzie King.

Getting here

335 Laurier Avenue East
Ottawa ON K1N 6R4

Hours of operation

Closed from October 10, 2017 until May 18, 2018.

Complete schedule
Contact the site for rentals or special events.

Fees

Free admission in 2017. Other fees still apply.
Detailed fees list

Contact us

Telephone: 613-992-8142
Toll-free: 1-888-773-8888
Email: Laurier-House@pc.gc.ca

Sites nearby

  • Rideau Canal National Historic Site

    An historic 19th century military waterway linking rivers and lakes across Eastern Ontario’s countryside, the Rideau Canal is now a popular natural playground, perfect for boating, paddling, fishing, camping, hiking and cycling the canal’s wooded pathways.

  • Thousand Islands National Park

    Granite islands speckle the St. Lawrence River in a transition zone between Canadian Shield and Adirondack Mountains. Explore by boating, paddling, or hiking. Awesome Thousand Islands National Park awaits, a few hours from Toronto or Montreal.

  • Bellevue House National Historic Site

    Follow staff in period costume on a tour of Bellevue House. Hear stories about Canada’s first prime minister, who made history here in the 1840s. Feel a Lake Ontario breeze in an heirloom garden. 

  • Fort Wellington National Historic Site

    At Fort Wellington, one of the fortified posts the British built to defend its colonies against American invasion in 1812 and 1838, you can relive this precarious period when the fate of Canada hung in the balance.

  • Battle of the Windmill National Historic Site

    Visit the Battle of the Windmill National Historic site to see one of Canada’s most historically significant windmills, and learn how British redcoat and Canadian loyalists waged a battle to protect Upper Canada from invaders.