Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2017, and all information contained in these statements rests with the management of the Parks Canada Agency. These financial statements have been prepared by management using the Government's accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management's best estimates and judgment, and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Agency's financial transactions. Financial information submitted in the preparation of the Public Accounts of Canada, and included in the Agency's Departmental Results Report, is consistent with these financial statements.

Management is also responsible for maintaining an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are properly authorized and recorded in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and other applicable legislation, regulations, authorities and policies.

Management seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements through careful selection, training and development of qualified staff; through organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility; through communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards, and managerial authorities are understood throughout the Agency; and through conducting an annual risk-based assessment of the effectiveness of the system of ICFR.

The system of ICFR is designed to mitigate risks to a reasonable level based on an ongoing process to identify key risks, to assess effectiveness of associated key controls, and to make any necessary adjustments.

A risk-based assessment of the system of ICFR for the year ended March 31, 2017 was completed in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Control and the results and action plans are summarized in the annex.

The effectiveness and adequacy of the Agency's system of internal control is reviewed by the work of internal audit staff, who conduct periodic audits of different areas of the Agency's operations, and by the Audit Committee, which oversees management's responsibilities for maintaining adequate control systems and the quality of financial reporting.

The financial statements of the Agency have not been audited.

Daniel Watson

Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada
August 28, 2017

Sylvain Michaud

Chief Financial Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada
August 28, 2017

Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)

Table 1 as at March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Liabilities 2017 (Note 17)
2016
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 4) 164,178 150,619
Environmental liability (Note 5) 50,638 37,237
Deferred revenue (Note 6) 34,932 30,244
Lease obligations for tangible capital assets (Note 7) 2,831 3,184
Employee future benefits (Note 8) 10,306 11,347
Total liabilities 262,885 232,631
Financial assets
Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 172,265 164,779
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 9) 22,210 13,079
Total financial assets 194,475 177,858
Net debt 68,410 54,773
Non-financial assets
Prepaid expenses 2,558 2,995
Inventory (Note 10) 8,595 8,724
Tangible capital assets (Note 11) 2,760,958 2,312,428
Total non-financial assets 2,772,111 2,324,147
Net financial position (Note 12) 2,703,701 2,269,374

Contingent liabilities and contractual obligations (Notes 13 and 14)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Daniel Watson

Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada
August 28, 2017

Sylvain Michaud

Chief Financial Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada
August 28, 2017

Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position (Unaudited)

Table 2 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Expenses 2017 Planned Results 2017 (Note 17)
2016
Parks Canada Programs
Heritage Places Establishment 17,149 12,161 16,908
Heritage Resources Conservation 131,730 157,882 151,903
Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support 47,358 48,360 44,161
Visitor Experience 274,007 324,077 286,947
Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management 70,883 89,671 78,180
Internal Services 141,002 167,748 148,637
Total expenses 682,129 799,899 726,736
Revenues
Entrance fees 60,468 68,972 69,737
Recreational fees 25,484 33,693 29,128
Rentals and concessions 25,051 28,008 25,552
Other operating revenues 6,140 7,508 8,460
Townsites revenues 2,812 3,253 3,345
Staff housing 3,115 3,233 3,253
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (70) (84) (83)
Total revenues 123,000 144,583 139,392
Net cost from continuing operations 559,129 655,316 587,344
Government funding and transfers
Net cash provided by Government   1,032,416 832,026
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund   7,486 60,614
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 15)   49,727 46,367
Transfer of the transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears   (3) (111)
Transfer of assets from other government departments   17 5,389
Total government funding and transfers   1,089,643 944,285
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers   (434,327) (356,941)
Net financial position - Beginning of year   2,269,374 1,912,433
Net financial position - End of year   2,703,701 2,269,374

Segmented information (Note 16)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Statement of Change in Net Debt (Unaudited)

Table 3 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (434,327) (356,941)
Change due to tangible capital assets
Acquisitions and improvements to tangible capital assets 557,746 458,630
Amortization of tangible capital assets (96,908) (85,238)
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (1,030) (956)
Net loss on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments (11,295) (5,176)
Transfer from other government departments 17 5,389
Total change due to tangible capital assets 448,530 372,649
Change due to inventory (129) 385
Change due to prepaid expenses (437) 397
Net increase in net debt 13,637 16,490
Net debt - Beginning of year 54,773 38,283
Net debt - End of year 68,410 54,773

The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)

Table 4 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Operating activities
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 655,316 587,344
Non-cash items:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (96,908) (85,238)
Net loss on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments (11,295) (5,176)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 15a) (49,727) (46,367)
Transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears 3 111
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:
Increase in accounts receivable and advances 9,131 4,955
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses (437) 397
Increase (decrease) in inventory (129) 385
Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities (13,559) (58,172)
Increase in deferred revenue (4,688) (11,176)
Decrease in employee future benefits 1,041 20
Increase in environmental liability (13,401) (13,065)
Cash used in operating activities 475,347 374,018
Capital investing activities
Acquisitions and improvements to tangible capital assets 557,746 458,630
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (1,030) (956)
Cash used in capital investing activities 556,716 457,674
Financing activities
Payments on lease obligations 353 334
Cash used in financing activities 353 334
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 1,032,416 832,026

The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited) for the year ended March 31

1. Authority and objectives

In December 1998, Parks Canada Agency (the Agency) was established under the Parks Canada Agency Act as a departmental corporation and acts  as an agent of Her Majesty in Right of Canada. The Parks Canada Agency is a separate entity listed under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and reports to the Minister of the Environment. The Agency is not subject to the provisions of the Income Tax Act.

The Agency's mandate is to protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations. In carrying out its mandate, the Agency delivers the programs set out in the Agency's legislation and authorities.

The authorities for the programs for which Parks Canada is responsible are mainly derived from the Parks Canada Agency Act , the Canada National Parks Act , the Rouge National Urban Park Act , the Historic Sites and Monuments Act , the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act, the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act, the Historic Canal Regulations pursuant to the Department of Transport Act, the Heritage Railway  Stations Protection Act , the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act , and the Species at Risk Act.

The programs include:

Heritage Places Establishment:
This program aims to establish heritage places in order to conserve Canada’s natural and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations, thus fostering a strong sense of connection to our natural and cultural heritage. This program also supports Canada’s involvement in the internationally shared objective of protecting and commemorating the best of the world’s natural and cultural heritage. By establishing national parks and national marine conservation areas in each of Canada’s natural terrestrial and marine regions,   this program ensures the protection and presentation of representative examples of Canada’s natural diversity. Likewise, the designation and commemoration of historic places, persons and events in communities across Canada ensures our history remains a living legacy for all Canadians. Establishment or designation is achieved through feasibility assessments, public nominations, research, consultation with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders and the general public, negotiations with other governments and Indigenous organizations, recommendations from advisory bodies and fulfilment of legislative requirements. This process results in established national parks and national marine conservation areas, and designated national historic sites, persons and events and other heritage places.
Heritage Places Conservation:
This program aims to protect and conserve the natural and cultural resources of all heritage places managed by Parks Canada, as well as the agricultural resources in the national urban park; and to fulfill responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada or mandated through federal legislation. Protection and conservation activities in a national urban park, national parks, national marine conservation areas, heritage canals and Parks Canada-administered national historic sites ensure that these heritage places are maintained and used in ways that leave them unimpaired for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.
Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support:
This program aims to nurture a sense of pride in and support for Parks Canada-administered places by increasing Canadians’ awareness, appreciation of their value and the various ways to experience them. This is achieved through relevant and effective heritage places promotion initiatives delivered to Canadians, reaching them in their daily lives. Some of these promotion activities are done in collaboration with stakeholders and partners to reach and engage more Canadians.
Visitor Experience:
This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites administered by Parks Canada, national marine conservation areas, and heritage canals. This program includes a range of activities, services and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on- site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation, recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities. The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement.
Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management:
This program involves the management of infrastructure for Canadians and provides opportunities for socio-economic benefits to adjacent communities. It is related to the operation, maintenance and improvement of the Trans-Canada and provincially numbered highways within national parks and a national historic site; the water management of certain heritage canals; and, the provision of municipal services to certain national park townsites.
Internal Services:
Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Services; and Acquisition Services.

2. Summary of significant accounting policies

These financial statements have been prepared using the Government's accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a) Parliamentary authorities

The Agency is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary authorities. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the Agency   do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 3 provides a reconciliation between the bases of reporting. The planned results amounts in the “Expenses” and “Revenues” sections of the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position are the amounts reported in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities . Planned results are not presented in the “Government funding and transfers” section of the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Change in Net Debt because these amounts were not included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities .

(b) Net cash provided by Government

The Agency operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Agency is deposited to the CRF, and all cash disbursements made by the Agency are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements, including transactions between departments of the Government.

(c) Due from the CRF

Amounts due from or to the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Agency is entitled to draw from the CRF without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

(d) Revenues

Entrance fees, recreational fees, rental and concessions, townsites, staff housing and other operating revenues are recognized in the year in which the goods or services are provided by the Agency.

Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenue. These revenues are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.

Funds that have been received are recorded as deferred revenue, provided the Agency has an obligation to other parties for the provision of goods, services or the use of assets in the future.

Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event that gave rise to the revenue takes place.

Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge the Agency's liabilities. While the Agency is expected to maintain accounting control, it has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues. As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government of Canada and are therefore presented in reduction of the Agency's gross revenues.

(e) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis:

  • Transfer payments are recorded as expenses when authorization for the payment exists and the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or the entitlements established for the transfer payment program. In situations where payments do not form part of an existing program, transfer payments are recorded as expenses when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements. Transfer payments that become repayable as a result of conditions specified in the contribution agreement that have come into being are recorded as a reduction to transfer payment expense and as a receivable.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are accrued as the benefits are earned by employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, employer contributions to the health and dental insurance plans, legal services and workers' compensation are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost. A corresponding amount is credited directly to the Net financial position.

(f) Employee future benefits

Pension benefits:
Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer pension plan administered by the Government. The Agency's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require the Agency to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
Severance benefits:
Employees entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment earn these benefits as services necessary to earn them are rendered. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

(g) Accounts receivable

Accounts receivable are stated at the lower of cost and net recoverable value. A valuation allowance is recorded for accounts receivable where recovery is considered uncertain.

(h) Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities that may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(i) Environmental liability

Environmental liabilities consist of estimated costs related to the remediation of contaminated sites as well as estimated costs related to obligations associated with the retirement of tangible capital assets and other environmental liabilities.

Contaminated Sites:

A liability for remediation of contaminated sites is recognized when all of the following criteria are satisfied: an environmental standard exists, contamination exceeds the environmental standard, the government is directly responsible or accepts responsibility, it is expected that future economic benefits will be given up and a reasonable estimate of the amount can be made. The liability reflects the Agency’s best estimate of the amount required to remediate the sites to the current minimum standard for its use prior to contamination. When the cash flows required to settle or otherwise extinguish a liability are expected to occur over extended future periods, a present value technique is used. The discount rate applied is taken from the government’s consolidated revenue fund monthly lending rates for periods of one year and over which is based on the Government's cost of borrowing. The discount rates used are based on the term rate associated with the estimated number of years to complete remediation. For remediation costs with estimated future cash flows spanning more than 25 years, the Government of Canada's 25-year Consolidated Revenue Fund lending rate is used as the discount rate.

The recorded environmental liabilities are adjusted each year, as required, for present value adjustments, inflation, new obligations, changes in management estimates and actual costs incurred.

If the likelihood of the Agency’s responsibility is not determinable, a contingent liability is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. If measurement uncertainty exists, it is also disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(j) Inventory

Inventory consists of consumable supplies. Inventory is valued at cost using the average cost method. If there is no longer any service potential, inventory is valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

(k) Tangible capital assets

(i) Tangible capital assets (excluding land)

All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. The Agency does not capitalize intangible assets, collections and archaeological sites.

Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

Capital Assets Class
Amortization Period

Buildings

25-50 years

Fortifications

50-100 years

Leasehold improvements

Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement

Leased tangible capital assets

Term of lease or economic life of the property if the lease contains a bargain purchase option

Landscaping and improvement

10-40 years

Roads

40 years

Bridges

25-50 years

Canals and marine facilities

25-80 years

Utilities

20-40 years

Vehicles and equipment

3-15 years

Exhibits

5-10 years

Assets under construction are recorded in the applicable capital asset class in the year that they become available for use and are not amortized until they become available for use.

(ii) Land
Acquired lands are recorded at historical cost. Crown lands acquired as a result of Confederation or the subsequent joining of a province or territory are recorded at a nominal value. Donated lands are recorded at their estimated market value at time of acquisition.

(l) Measurement uncertainty

The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, environmental liabilities, the liability for employee future benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year  they become known.

Environmental liabilities are subject to measurement uncertainty as discussed in Note 5 due to the evolving technologies used in the estimation of the costs for remediation of contaminated sites or asset retirements, the use of discounted present value of future estimated costs, and the fact that not all sites have had a complete assessment of the extent and nature of remediation or retirement. Changes to underlying assumptions, the timing of the expenditures, the technology employed, or the revisions to environmental standards or changes in regulatory requirements could result in significant changes to the environmental liabilities recorded.

3. Parliamentary authorities

The Agency receives most of its funding through annual parliamentary authorities. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Agency has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used

Table 5 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 (Note 17)
2016
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 655,316 587,344
Revenues received pursuant to section 20 of the Parks Canada Agency Act 144,583 139,392
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (96,908) (85,238)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (49,727) (46,367)
Net loss on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments (11,295) (5,176)
Increase in vacation pay and compensatory leave (1,274) (472)
Decrease in employee future benefits 1,041 20
Increase in environmental liability (13,401) (13,065)
Refund of prior years' expenditures 1,575 1,328
Increase (decrease) in New Parks and Historic Sites Account 43 (365)
Other 708 (172)
Total items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities (169,238) (149,507)
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Acquisitions and improvements to tangible capital assets 557,746 458,630
Salary overpayments 2,617 -
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (1,030) (956)
Decrease in lease obligation for tangible capital assets 353 334
Increase (decrease) in inventory (129) 385
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses (437) 397
Transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears 3 111
Other 1,909 -
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities 561,032 458,901
Current year authorities used 1,191,693 1,036,130

(b) Authorities provided and used

Table 6 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Authorities provided:
Vote 1 - Program expenditures 1,252,025 986,023
Vote 5 - New Parks and Historic Sites Account 500 500
Statutory amounts:
Expenditures equivalent to revenue received pursuant to section 20 of the Parks Canada Agency Act 166,348 163,136
Contributions to employee benefit plans 50,864 50,198
Total authorities 1,469,737 1,199,857
Less:
Authorities available for future years 275,791 160,995
Lapsed authorities 2,253 2,732
Current year authorities used 1,191,693 1,036,130

4. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

Table 7 for the year ended March 31
The following table presents details of the Agency’s accounts payable and accrued liabilities:
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Accounts payable - Other government departments and agencies 25,054 31,736
Accounts payable - External parties 104,320 97,506
Total accounts payable 129,374 129,242
Accrued liabilities 34,804 21,377
Total accounts payable and accrued liabilities 164,178 150,619

5. Environmental liability

The government has developed a “Federal Approach to Contaminated Sites" , which incorporates a risk-based approach to the management of contaminated sites. Under this approach the Government has inventoried the contaminated sites on federal lands that have been identified, allowing them to be classified, managed and recorded in a consistent manner. This systematic approach aides in the identification of the high risk sites in order to allocate limited resources to those sites which pose the highest risk to the environment and human health.

The Agency has identified a total of 235 sites (235 sites in 2015-16) where contamination may exist and assessment, remediation and monitoring may be required. Of these, the Agency has assessed 91 sites (87 sites in 2015-16) where action is possible and for which liability of $33,739,995 ($23,993,167 in 2015-16) has been recorded. This liability estimate has been determined after the sites are assessed and is based on environmental experts reviewing the results of site assessments, and proposing possible remediation solutions.

In addition, a statistical model based upon a projection of the number of sites that will proceed to remediation and upon which current and historical costs are applied is used to estimate the liability for a group of unassessed sites. As a result, there are 122 unassessed sites (100 sites in 2015-16) where a liability estimate of $16,898,177 ($13,243,359 in 2015-16) has been recorded using this model.

These two estimates combined, totalling $50,638,172 ($37,236,526 in 2015-16) represents management’s best estimate of the costs required to remediate the sites to the current minimum standard for its use prior to contamination, based on information available at the financial statement date.

Of the remaining 22 sites (48 sites in 2015-16), no liability for remediation has been recognized. Some of these sites are at various stages of testing and evaluation and if remediation is required, liabilities will be reported as soon as a reasonable estimate can be determined. For other sites, the Agency does not expect to give up any future economic benefits (there is likely no significant environmental impact or human health threats). These sites will be re-examined and a liability for remediation will be recognized if future economic benefits will be given up.

The following table presents the total estimated amounts of these liabilities by nature and source, the associated expected recoveries and the total undiscounted future expenditures as at March 31, 2017, and March 31, 2016. When the liability estimate is based on a future cash requirement, the amount is adjusted for inflation using a forecast CPI rate of 2%.  Inflation is included in the undiscounted amount. The Government of Canada  lending rate applicable to loans with similar terms to maturity has been used to discount the estimated future expenditures. The March 2017 rates range from 0.89% for 2 year term to 2.55% for a 25 or greater year term.

Table 8 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Nature and Source Number of Sites 2017 Estimated Liability 2017 Estimated Total Undiscounted Expenditures 2017 Number of Sites 2016 Estimated Liability 2016 Estimated Total Undiscounted Expenditures 2016
Former Mineral Exploration Sites 1 4 3,791,169 3,907,206 4 3,801,748 3,874,055
Military & Former Military Sites 2 1 148,456 153,000 1 147,200 150,000
Fuel Related Practices 3 30 7,443,295 7,700,353 23 3,619,268 3,688,104
Landfill/Waste Sites 4 106 17,817,638 18,728,903 102 13,234,040 13,485,743
Engineered Asset/Air & Land Transportation 5 2 346,446 357,050 2 360,908 367,772
Marine Facilities/Aquatic Sites 6 6 1,409,716 1,493,522 5 1,235,971 1,259,478
Office/Commercial/Industrial Operations 7 44 17,109,419 17,700,231 34 12,440,928 12,677,546
Other 8 20 2,572,033 2,664,893 16 2,396,463 2,442,042
Totals 213 50,638,172 52,705,158 187 37,236,526 37,944,740
Table 7 note 1

Contamination associated with former mine activities, e.g. heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, etc. Sites often have multiple sources of contamination.

1

Table 7 note 2

Contamination associated with the operations of military and former military sites where activities such as fuel handling and storage activities, waste sites, metals/PCB-based paint used on buildings resulted in former or accidental contamination, e.g. petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals.  Sites often have multiple sources of contamination.

2

Table 7 note 3

Contamination primarily associated with fuel storage and handling, e.g. accidental spills related to fuel storage tanks or former fuel handling practices, e.g. petroleum hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and BTEX.

3

Table 7 note 4

Contamination associated with former landfill/waste site or leaching from materials deposited in the landfill/waste site, e.g. metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, BTEX, other organic contaminants, etc.

4

Table 7note 5

Contamination associated with the operations of engineered assets such as airports, railways and roads where activities such as, fuel storage/handling, waste sites, firefighting training facilities and chemical storage areas resulted in former or accidental contamination, e.g. metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, BTEX and other organic contaminants. Sites often have multiple sources of contamination.

5

Table 7 note 6

Contamination associated with the operations of marine assets, e.g. port facilities, harbours, navigation systems, light stations, hydrometric stations, where activities such as fuel storage/handling, use of metal based paint (e.g. on light stations) resulted in former or accidental contamination, e.g. metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and other organic contaminants. Sites often have multiple sources of contamination.

6

Table 7 note 7

Contamination associated with the operations of the office/commercial/industrial facilities where activities such as fuel storage/handling waste sites and use of metal-based paint resulted in former or accidental contamination, e.g. metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, BTEX, etc. Sites often have multiple sources of contamination.

7

Table 7 note 8

Contamination from other sources, e.g. use of pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers at agricultural sites; use of PCB, firefighting training areas, firing ranges and training facilities, etc.

8

6. Deferred revenue

Deferred revenue represents the balance at year-end of unearned revenues stemming from amounts received from external parties for fees prior to services being performed. Revenue is recognized in the period in which the service is performed. Details of the transactions related to this account are as follows:

Table 9 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Deferred revenue - Beginning of year 30,244 19,068
Amounts received 31,620 29,154
Revenue recognized (26,932) (17,978)
Deferred revenue - End of year 34,932 30,244

7. Lease obligations for tangible capital asset

Agency has entered into agreements to lease commercial and office space under capital leases with a cost of $20,967,931 and accumulated amortization of $7,521,320 as at March 31, 2017 ($21,171,904 and $7,030,065 respectively as at March 31, 2016). The obligations related to the the upcoming years include the following:

Table 10 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
2016-17 - 544
2017-18 544 544
2018-19 544 544
2019-20 509 509
2020-21 403 403
2021-22 and thereafter 1,592 1,582
Total future minimum lease payment 3,592 4,126
Less: imputed interest (6.3%) 761 942
Balance of obligations under leased tangible capital assets 2,831 3,184

8. Employee future benefits

(a) Pension benefits

The Agency's employees participate in the public service pension plan (the "Plan"), which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the Agency contribute to the cost of the Plan. Due to the amendment of the Public Service Superannuation Act following the implementation of provisions related to Economic Action Plan 2012, employee contributors have been divided into two groups – Group 1 relates to existing plan members as of December 31, 2012 and Group 2 relates to members joining the Plan as of January 1, 2013. Each group has a distinct contribution rate.

The 2016-17 expense amounts to $35,437,044 ($34,601,585 in 2015-16). For Group 1 members, the expense represents approximately 1.12 times (1.25 times in 2015-16) the employee contributions and, for Group 2 members, approximately 1.08 times (1.24 times in 2015-16) the employee contributions.

The Agency's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the Financial Statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

(b) Severance benefits

The Agency provided severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and salary at termination of employment. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future authorities. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:

As part of collective agreement negotiations, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased commencing in 2012. Employees have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service. These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

Table 11 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Accrued benefit obligation - Beginning of year 11,347 11,367
Expense for the year 621 2,626
Benefits paid during the year (1,662) (2,646)
Accrued benefit obligation - End of year 10,306 11,347

9. Accounts receivable and advances

Table 12 for the year ended March 31
The following table presents details of the Agency's accounts receivable and advances balances:
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Receivables - Other government departments and agencies 8,738 5,352
Receivables - External parties 12,849 9,104
Employee advances 2,154 273
Subtotal 23,741 14,729
Allowance for doubtful accounts on receivables from external parties (1,531) (1,650)
Total accounts receivable and advances 22,210 13,079

10. Inventory

Table 13 for the year ended March 31
The following table presents details of the Agency's inventory mainly consisting of consumable supplies, measured at cost using the average cost method:
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Stationery, office and miscellaneous supplies 1,973 2,329
Equipment, materials and supplies 1,842 1,664
Top soil, sand, gravel and other crude material 909 1,238
Safety equipment 892 896
Fuel and other petroleum products 756 800
Fabricated wood and metal products 732 707
Construction material and supplies 661 441
Printed books, publications and maps 423 352
Uniforms and protective clothing 407 297
Total inventory 8,595 8,724
The cost of consumed inventory recognized as an expense in the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position is $41,460,727 in 2016-17 ($41,503,681 in 2015-16).

11. Tangible capital assets

Table 14 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Cost (Note 17)
Opening Balance
Acquisitions Adjustments Footnote 1 Disposals and Write-offs Closing Balance
Tangible capital assets
Land 184,103 3,500 (417) 1,909 185,277
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements 975,100 19,206 17,495 22,758 989,043
Landscaping and improvement 667,920 7,140 2,280 2,037 675,303
Roads 1,317,446 52,952 105,371 16,225 1,459,544
Bridges 395,592 31,247 58,419 3,755 481,503
Canal and marine facilities 626,040 4,033 13,327 627 642,773
Utilities 267,177 9,640 8,412 645 284,584
Vehicles and equipment 163,765 14,426 9,164 8,951 178,404
Exhibits 103,544 568 2,204 294 106,022
- 4,700,687 142,712 216,255 57,201 5,002,453
Assets under construction
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements 55,407 62,614 (16,789) 367 100,865
Landscaping and improvement 23,013 33,900 (7,445) 453 49,015
Roads 179,776 147,734 (116,591) - 210,919
Bridges 58,398 59,696 (37,538) 14 80,542
Canal and marine facilities 49,859 72,244 (19,151) 33 102,919
Utilities 27,141 25,902 (6,542) 146 46,355
Vehicles and equipment 10,434 8,595 (4,335) 105 14,589
Exhibits 2,412 4,349 (108) 40 6,613
- 406,440 415,034 (208,499) 1,158 611,817
Leased tangible capital assets
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements 20,968 - - - 20,968
Vehicles and equipment 204 - - 204 -
- 21,172 - - 204 20,968
Total 5,128,299 557,746 7,756 58,563 5,635,238
Footnote 1

Adjustments include assets under construction of $209,113,787 that were transferred to the other categories upon completion of the assets.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

 
Table 15 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Accumulated Amortization Opening Balance Amortization Adjustments Disposals and Write-offs Closing Balance Net Book Value
2017 2016
Tangible capital assets
Land - - - - - 185,277 184,103
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements 642,887 21,568 (49) 16,323 648,083 340,960 332,213
Landscaping and improvement 577,596 7,859 (374) 771 584,310 90,993 90,324
Roads 795,319 29,726 (7) 14,101 810,937 648,607 522,127
Bridges 129,937 8,531 591 2,754 136,305 345,198 265,655
Canal and marine facilities 338,627 7,728 - 431 345,924 296,849 287,413
Utilities 132,864 6,136 89 252 138,837 145,747 134,313
Vehicles and equipment 101,105 11,672 4,754 8,395 109,136 69,268 62,660
Exhibits 90,506 2,993 22 294 93,227 12,795 13,038
- 2,808,841 96,213 5,026 43,321 2,866,759 2,135,694 1,891,846
Assets under construction
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements - - - - - 100,865 55,407
Landscaping and improvement - - - - - 49,015 23,013
Roads - - - - - 210,919 179,776
Bridges - - - - - 80,542 58,398
Canal and marine facilities - - - - - 102,919 49,859
Utilities - - - - - 46,355 27,141
Vehicles and equipment - - - - - 14,589 10,434
Exhibits - - - - - 6,613 2,412
- - - - - - 611,817 406,440
Leased tangible capital assets
Buildings, fortifications and leasehold improvements 6,826 695 - - 7,521 13,447 14,142
Vehicles and equipment 204 - - 204 - - -
- 7,030 695 - 204 7,521 13,447 14,142
Total 2,815,871 96,908 5,026 43,525 2,874,280 2,760,958 2,312,428

12. Net financial position

A portion of the Agency's net financial position is used for a specific purpose. Related revenues and expenses are included in the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position.

The New Parks and Historic Sites Account was established pursuant to the Parks Canada Agency Act . Funds are provided to the New Parks and Historic Sites Account by voted authorities, proceeds from the sale of lands and buildings that are surplus to operational requirements and all general donations. Furthermore, the Minister of Finance may, on the request of the Minister of the Environment, authorize the making of advances of up to $10 million to the New Parks and Historic Sites Account. All amounts received remain in this account until eligible capital expenditures are made for the purpose of establishing or developing new parks or historic sites and heritage areas, in compliance with the terms and conditions set out in the Parks Canada Agency Act and related Treasury Board directives. The balance of the account is to be used to acquire lands or property required to establish any national park, national historic site or other protected heritage area that has not yet attained full operation status,  and to  make any related contributions.

The late The Right Hon W L Mackenzie King bequeathed Laurier House, Ottawa, and the sum of $225,000, to the Government of Canada. The amount of $225,000 was credited to the account and earns interest, in accordance with the terms of section 3 of the Laurier House Act . The interest is to be used to assist in the maintenance of the Laurier House, which is to be preserved as a place of historic interest, and also to provide accommodation for study and research.

Table 16 for the year ended March 31
The following table presents details of the Agency's net financial position (in thousands of dollars):
Restricted 2017 (Note 17)
2016
New Parks and Historic Sites Account
Available at beginning of year 14,718 13,708
Reclassification of donated funds - 1,375
- 14,718 15,083
Receipts:
Parliamentary authorities 500 500
Proceeds on disposal of tangible capital assets 336 1,521
Donations 3 4
- 839 2,025
Capital expenditures 796 2,390
New Parks and Historic Sites Account - Available at end of year 14,761 14,718
Mackenzie King Trust Account 225 225
Restricted - Available at end of year 14,986 14,943
Unrestricted 2,688,715 2,254,431
Net financial position at year end 2,703,701 2,269,374

13. Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities arise in the normal course of operations and their ultimate disposition is unknown. Claims have been made against the Agency in the normal course of operations. These claims include items with pleading amounts and other for which no amount is specified. While the total amount claimed in these actions is significant, their outcomes are not determinable. Claims and litigations for which the outcome is not determinable and a reasonable estimate can be made by management amount to approximately $25,640,000 at March 31, 2017 ($42,790,000 in 2015-16).

14. Contractual obligations

The nature of the Agency's activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby the Agency will be obligated to make future payments in order to carry out its transfer payment programs or when the services/goods are received. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

Table 17 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 and thereafter Total
Operating leases 879 503 259 201 446 2,288
Purchases and transfer payments 299,516 166,580 182,866 181 165 649,308
Total 300,395 167,083 183,125 382 611 651,596

15. Related party transactions

The Agency is related as a result of common ownership to all government departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The Agency enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. During the year, the Agency received common services which were obtained without charge from other government departments as disclosed below.

a) Common services provided without charge by other government departments

During the year, the Agency received services without charge from certain common service organizations, related to accommodation, legal services, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and workers' compensation coverage. These services provided without charge have been recorded in the Agency's Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position as follows:

Table 18 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans 30,908 27,260
Accommodation 18,514 17,925
Legal services 224 1,106
Workers' compensation 81 76
Total 49,727 46,367

The Government has centralized some of its administrative activities for efficiency, cost-effectiveness purposes and economic delivery of programs to the public. As a result, the Government uses central agencies and common service organizations so that one department performs services for all  other departments and agencies without charge. The costs of these services, such as the payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada as well as the email, network and data centre services and the workplace technology devices provided by Shared Services Canada are not included in the Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position.

(b) Other transactions with related parties

Table 19 for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars) 2017 2016
Accounts receivable - Other government departments and agencies 8,738 5,352
Accounts payable - Other government departments and agencies 25,054 31,736
Expenses - Other Government departments and agencies 258,473 221,699
Revenues - Other Government departments and agencies 955 576
Expenses and revenues disclosed in (b) exclude common services provided without charge, which are already disclosed in (a).

16. Segmented Information

Presentation by segment is based on the Agency's program alignment architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in Note 2. The following table presents the expenses incurred and revenues generated for the main programs, by major object of expenses and by major type of revenues. The segment results for the period are as follows:

Table 20 for the year ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
Heritage Places Establishment Heritage Places Conservation Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support Visitor Experience Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management Internal Services 2017 (Note 17) 2016
Salaries and employee benefits 4,862 82,705 32,259 144,418 22,040 112,452 398,736 382,795
Operating expenses
Amortization of tangible capital assets 12 8,038 416 50,703 33,411 4,328 96,908 85,238
Professional and special services 431 31,064 3,678 21,770 7,796 18,180 82,919 78,856
Utilities, materials and supplies 351 8,842 1,298 33,934 11,136 7,338 62,899 62,532
Payments in lieu of taxes - - - 37,128 - - 37,128 13,729
Transportation and communications 459 4,654 2,161 8,658 431 6,954 23,317 16,211
Accommodation 216 3,783 1,429 6,870 1,132 5,084 18,514 17,926
Repairs and maintenance - 3,078 35 7,845 4,682 1,961 17,601 18,863
Rentals 88 6,482 804 5,668 207 4,329 17,578 19,985
Net loss on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments - 577 - 2,559 2,689 5,470 11,295 5,176
Information 52 300 4,826 3,607 23 742 9,550 7,935
Miscellaneous expenses 3 108 14 513 6,112 910 7,660 2,401
Total Operating expenses 1,612 66,926 14,661 179,255 67,619 55,296 385,369 328,852
Grants and contributions 5,687 8,251 1,440 404 12 - 15,794 15,089
Total expenses 12,161 157,882 48,360 324,077 89,671 167,748 799,899 726,736
Revenues
Entrance fees - - - 68,972 - - 68,972 69,737
Recreational fees - - - 33,693 - - 33,693 29,128
Rentals and concessions - 780 - 15,891 1,404 9,933 28,008 25,552
Other operating revenues - 817 117 3,300 406 2,868 7,508 8,460
Townsites revenues - - - - 3,253 - 3,253 3,345
Staff housing - - - - - 3,233 3,233 3,253
Revenues earned on behalf of Government - - - - - (84) (84) (83)
Total revenues - 1,597 117 121,856 5,063 15,950 144,583 139,392
Net cost from continuing operations 12,161 156,285 48,243 202,221 84,608 151,798 655,316 587,344

17. Comparative information

Comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.