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Natural Region 35

STATUS OF NATIONAL PARKS:

Terra Nova National Park (400 km2) was established pursuant to a federal-provincial agreement in 1957. With its jagged rocky shorelines backed by dense boreal forest, the park protects an outstanding example of this natural region. The fiords or "sounds" that indent the coast are the park's most distinctive feature.

Terra Nova National Park
Terra Nova National Park

Icebergs and whales can often be seen from the headlands framing the fiords. The teeming waters of Bonavista Bay and Newman Sound have attracted fishermen for hundreds of years, and some of Newfoundland's oldest settlements were located in the park.

Inland are numberless bogs and lakes filling depressions gouged out by the passing of glaciers during the Ice Age. Raised bogs, gentle domes rising about 1.5 metres above the surrounding terrain, are common. Sprouting from the sphagnum mosses and lichens are pitcher plants, their curious deep crimson flowers conspicuous among the mainly pastel colours of the vegetation. Other plants that thrive in the acidic conditions found in bogs include Labrador tea, leatherleaf, bog laurel and sundews. The forest is dominated by black spruce and balsam fir. Much of the forest was logged before the park was established.

The wildlife found in the park is typical of this region. Caribou, once common in this part of Newfoundland, are still occasionally spotted.

Moose, introduced to Newfoundland in 1878 and 1904, thrive and are often seen grazing in the park along the Trans-Canada highway. The Newfoundland pine marten has recently been reintroduced in Terra Nova National Park. The Terra Nova River provides fine fishing for Atlantic salmon and speckled trout.

Natural Region 35
Natural Region 35


National Parks System Plan, 3rd Edition

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