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Hudson Bay Lowlands


Natural Region 27

STATUS OF NATIONAL PARKS:

A federal-provincial agreement establishing Wapusk National Park was signed in Churchill on April 24th, 1996 in the presence of the Prince of Wales, whose namesake fort is nearby. Parks Canada, Manitoba, the Local Government District of Churchill and Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (representing the northern Manitoba First Nations of Fox Lake and York Factory) worked together to achieve this agreement. Wapusk National Park, at 11,475 km2, is the largest national park situated entirely in the provinces. Wapusk is the Cree name for white bear.

The national park includes one of the largest known polar bear denning sites in the world and is one of the most accessible places known to view polar bears. The Hudson Bay coastline provides critical waterfowl and shorebird nesting and feeding habitat.

In addition, the area includes most of the natural resource features typical of the larger natural region, including: low-lying landscape with little relief; extensive muskeg; beach ridges; glacial features such as eskers; permafrost; and low arctic and subarctic vegetation.

Attawapiskat River
Attawapiskat River
© Parks Canada

Not only does the proposed national park offer superlative wildlife viewing, but visitors to the area can also enjoy significant cultural resources.

James Bay Lowlands
James Bay Lowlands
© Parks Canada

Four sites of national historic significance are located in the vicinity, including York Factory, for nearly three centuries the Hudson's Bay Company's principal fur trade centre, and the ruins of Fort Prince of Wales, a massive stone fortification built by the Hudson's Bay Company in the 1700s.

Natural Region 27
Natural Region 27
© Parks Canada


National Parks System Plan, 3rd Edition

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