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Ungava Tundra Plateau


Ungava Tundra Plateau


Nastapoka Falls
Nastapoka Falls

A SILENT, ENDLESS LAND

Scattered, patternless lakes, a litter of angular boulders and a pastel green and grey sweep of rock and low shrubs that goes on seemingly forever without change - silent except for the screams of the circling hawks.

THE LAND:

This is a vast wild peneplain, strewn with low granite hills and strewn with boulders. The region is underlain by the bedrock of the Canadian Shield, which lies exposed over much of the land; in other places it is smoothed by a thin veneer of glacial drift. At the coast of Hudson Strait, the plateau stops abruptly, plunging precipitously as much as 600 metres to the sea.

The New Quebec Crater, the most spectacular and well-defined meteorite impact crater in Canada, is found in this region.

This is a "simple crater" - a circular depression 260 metres deep in solid granite and 3 kilometres across, surrounded by walls over 150 metres high. One of the clearest lakes in the world fills much of the crater.

Hudson Bay Coast
Hudson Bay Coast

The climate is rigorous. There are really only two seasons - a long, bitterly cold winter and a brief cool summer. The lowest monthly temperature is never above freezing point. Snow lies from the end of September to the end of June, and in deeper ravines as late as the middle of July.

VEGETATION:

This region is characterized by a nearly continuous cover of dwarf tundra vegetation, usually less than 30 centimetres tall. Creeping black spruce, dwarf birch, willow and woody shrubs such as northern Labrador tea, blueberry, crowberry, and bearberry are conspicuous species. In the brief fall, the leaves of the low arctic shrubs carpet the tundra in brilliant shades of red and orange.

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National Parks System Plan, 3 rd Edition

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