Management Plan

Appendix C

Appropriate Use Criteria

Parks Canada is responsible for making decisions about the type of use that is appropriate in a national park. In cases where the Canada National Parks Act, Parks Canada Guiding Principles and Operational Policies (1994) and the Park Management Plan are not clear on appropriate use, Parks Canada must rely on other, clearly defined criteria in coming to a decision. The following criteria will be used to evaluate the merits of a new use, a change in an existing use, or a significant change in the level of intensity of use. Adjustments may be necessary at times and the review process must be flexible enough to accommodate changing public values and perspectives.

Impact on the Environment

  • seeks to assess the extent to which the proposed change impacts the ecological integrity of the region. The assessment will include the effect of participation in the activity as well as the facilities and services required to support the activity.

Effects on Culture and Heritage

  • seeks to assess the qualitative dimension and preservation of a use that contributes to the region’s heritage and cultural integrity. The assessment will reflect an understanding, appreciation of, and respect for the region’s culture and heritage, and evolving cultural identity including Aboriginal people.

Quality of Experience

  • investigates the extent to which the participant’s and other’s quality of experience is enhanced or diminished as a result of the proposed change. Its application recognizes that different visitors seek a broad range of different experiences, and that they value different resources, facilities and services in different ways.

Economic Effects

  • attempts to understand the economic effects of the proposed change. Issues that would be considered include: cost for visitors to the park, cost and revenues to Parks Canada, and effect on local, regional and national economies and market conditions.

Public Safety

  • used to determine the extent to which the proposed change imposes risks or dangers to participants or others.

Equity and Access

  • seeks to ensure that all citizens have a fair, reasonable, and equitable opportunity to participate in, and benefit from, the range of appropriate activities and experiences available in Mount Revelstoke National Park, Glacier National Park and Rogers Pass National Historic Site. It will consider such factors as economic status, physical capabilities, and place of residence of the visitor.

Social Effects/Quality of Life

  • examines the social implications of the proposed change. Questions applied here would speak to: level of change to the region’s existing social patterns and needs, effects on the social service structure, effects on social indicators (e.g., income distribution, housing costs, levels of crime, etc).

Education and Awareness

  • focuses on the extent to which the proposed change contributes to better understanding and appreciation of natural and cultural heritage, Mount Revelstoke National Park, Glacier National Park and Rogers Pass National Historic Site, their role within the Canadian national park system and in the larger ecosystem.

Level of Use: Frequency, Timing, and Quantity

  • would involve questions such as: How often does a proposed activity occur? When does it occur (e.g., season)? How many individuals are involved? What is the level of support required?

Physical Setting Related

  • has two components. The first focuses on whether the proposed change is well-suited to the physical setting of Mount Revelstoke National Park, Glacier National Park and Rogers Pass National Historic Site. The second considers to what extent the proposed change is dependent upon a national park setting.

Heritage Tourism

  • focuses on the extent to which the proposed change contributes to the parks’ Heritage Tourism goals.

Environmental Stewardship

  • focuses on the extent to which the proposed change contributes to the parks’ Environmental Stewardship goals.

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