The Women and Health study resulted in several new designations of sites, persons and events of national historic significance. Begbie Hall in Victoria, British Columbia, the Ann Baillie Building in Kingston, Ontario, and the Hershey Pavilion in Montréal, were designated as central to the evolution of the nursing profession. Jeanne Mance, founder of the l'Hôtel Dieu in Montréal and Canada's first lay nurse, renowned for the quality of her care under extreme conditions, was designated a person of national historic significance. The Victorian Order of Nurses and public health physician Dr.Helen MacMurchy were designated for their role in public health.

The Women and Power study resulted in several designations of persons of national historic significance, including Edith Jessie Archibald, E.Cora Hind and Marie Lacoste-Gérin Lajoie, key figures in the struggle for women's rights. The Persons Case, a landmark in establishing women's political rights, has been designated as an event of national historic significance.
E. Cora Hind - Addvocate of Women's Rights and Sufferance in Manitoba
E. Cora Hind
Addvocate of Women's Rights and Sufferance in Manitoba

Jeanne Mance - Founder of l'Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal
Jeanne Mance
Founder of l'Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal
Hershey Pavilion, Quebec - Nurses' Residences were Central to Nursing Culture
Hershey Pavilion, Quebec
Nurses' Residences were Central to Nursing Culture

See the end of this chapter for detailed information about this topic in a poster format.


National Historic Sites Of Canada System Plan

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