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The Minister of Canadian Heritage is committed to work closely with Aboriginal peoples to enhance the representation of their history within the system of National Historic Sites of Canada. To commemorate Aboriginal history more effectively, Parks Canada has adopted a number of changes in methodology. These include greater emphasis on consultation throughout the nomination process and a recognition of the importance of oral history and traditions.

     Kahkewaquonaby (Rev. Peter Jones) - First to Make Ojibwa a Written Language
Kahkewaquonaby
(Rev. Peter Jones)

First to Make
Ojibwa a Written
Language

Recent progress in enhancing the commemoration of the history of First Nations includes the designation of Grizzly Bear Mountain and Scented Grass Hills, a Sahtu Dene cultural landscape in the Northwest Territories, and the Kiix?in Village and Fortress, a Huu-ay-aht site with significant archaeological and architectural remains in Bamfield, British Columbia. Persons of national historic significance related to Aboriginal history include Molly Brant, a Loyalist Six Nations leader, and Kahkewaquonaby (Rev.Peter Jones) the Mississauga chief and Methodist minister who first developed a written Ojibwa language.

     Batoche, Saskatchewan - Métis Village, Site of 1885 Battle of Batoche
Batoche,Saskatchewan
Métis Village, Site of 1885 Battle of Batoche

Riel House, Manitoba - Family Home of Métis Leader, Louis Riel

Riel House, Manitoba
Family Home of Métis Leader, Louis Riel

National Historic Sites of Canada that relate to Métis history include Riel House in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the family home of Métis leader Louis Riel, as well as Batoche, a Métis village in Saskatchewan and the site of the 1885 Battle of Batoche. The recent designation of James Isbister, leader of the English-speaking Métis during the 1870s and 1880s contributes to the commemoration of Métis history.

Recent commemorations of Inuit history include Arvia'juaq and Qikiqtaarjuk in Nunavut, summer occupation sites where the Inuit returned to camp and harvested the marine resources, and the Fall Caribou Crossing on the Kazan River in Nunavut, a site of critical importance to the survival of the Caribou Inuit.

Aboriginal history cuts across all themes in Canadian history and touches all geographic areas in Canada. To date, the number of sites, persons and events relating to Aboriginal history represents about 10 percent of the total designations in the system. Parks Canada will strengthen its efforts to encourage proposals recognizing Aboriginal history.

Molly Brant - Loyalist Six Nations Leader
Molly Brant
Loyalist Six Nations Leader
See the end of this chapter for detailed information about this topic in a poster format.

National Historic Sites Of Canada System Plan

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