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PEOPLING THE LAND

Peopling The Land

The Letter T he land now known as Canada has supported a human population for many thousands of years. The First Nations lived on the land and learned to adapt to its geography. Over time, they were joined by people from all parts of the globe and Canada's cultural mosaic began to take shape. This theme celebrates the imprints and expressions of these people as they shaped Canada. It is made up of four sub-themes.

Canada's Earliest Inhabitants

Igloolik Island Archaeological Sites - Archaeological Sequence, 2000BC-1000AD This sub-theme deals with ancient Aboriginal sites and includes archaeological sites that show evidence of Canada's earliest inhabitants. Commemorations include the Port au Choix burial and habitation site in Newfoundland and the Dorset sites the Sea Horse Gully Remains in Churchill, Manitoba and the Igloolik Island Archaeological Sites in Nunavut.

Port aux Choix, Newfoundland - Pre-Contact Burial and Habitation Site
Port aux Choix, Newfoundland
Pre-Contact Burial and Habitation Site

Migration and Immigration

Here, the focus is on the movement of peoples into and within Canada. A site such as Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial in Quebec, for example, commemorates the importance of immigration to Canada, the tragic events experienced at this site by many Irish immigrants, and the role the site played as the main quarantine station for the port of Québec. Other examples include events such as the Yorkshire Immigration, commemorating the 1772-1776 arrival of settlers in the Chignecto area of New Brunswick, and people such as Thayendanega (Joseph Brant), the Mohawk leader and British ally who led the Loyalist Mohawks to Canada and Sir Clifford Sifton, Canada's Minister of the Interior, whose aggressive immigration campaign attracted thousands of immigrants to the Canadian Prairies.    Yorkshire Immigration, Nova Scotia
Yorkshire Immigration, Nova Scotia
Settlers Arrived in Chignecta
(1772-1776)

Sir Clifford Sifton - Promoter of Immigration to West

National Historic Sites Of Canada System Plan
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