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Parks Canada 2010 Arctic Surveys

Meet Our Team

HMS Investigator and McClure Cache Survey

Protected within Parks Canada's National Park system is a rich array of archaeological sites, reflecting the diversity of people and communities that travelled and lived on the land. Parks in the far north, such as Aulavik National Park, are no exception and evidence of human activity from the first aboriginal inhabitants to European arctic explorers survives on the surface throughout these vast landscapes. A place where aboriginal history and European exploration converge is Mercy Bay in Aulavik National Park, where Captain Robert McClure and HMS Investigator were stranded for two brutal winters; although the crew never met Inuit in the bay, what they left behind significantly influenced Inuit life. The HMS Investigator story thus captivates not only the Canadian and European imagination but also holds special significance in the Inuvialuit of the Western Arctic.

The archaeological survey in Aulavik National Park was conducted from July 22 - August 3, 2010 and took a multidisciplinary approach to the site's investigation including, underwater archaeology surveys, terrestrial archaeology methods, geophysics, digital survey, and documentary history. The expertise to conduct this comprehensive work comes from not just Parks Canada, but includes researchers from the University of Western Ontario and Memorial University. The team is also fortunate to be the importance resources of its Inuvialuit members, who are playing a pivotal role in the project's planning and completion.

Thierry Boyer
Thierry Boyer
© Parks Canada

THIERRY BOYER was born on the South Shore of Montreal. He began his studies in anthropology and historical archaeology at Laval University in the city of Québec where he obtained a Bachelor's degree in 1999. He then went to France to complete a Master's degree in Marine Archaeology at the Sorbonne, studying ancient ship's bilge pumps. He began working with Parks Canada's Underwater Archaeology Service as a volunteer in 1997 on the excavation of the Elizabeth and Mary shipwreck (1690) and became a full-time underwater archaeologist with the team in 2007. Previously, he had participated in numerous archaeological projects, both underwater and terrestrial, in Wyoming, Québec and Ontario.

Most of his underwater archaeology expertise was developed however with the Department of Underwater Archaeological Research (DRASSM) in France on surveys in Le Havre and Arles, on the excavation of the two Lapérouse frigates sunk in 1788 near Vanikoro, Salomon Islands and, more importantly, on the long-term excavation of two 18th-century French frigates sunk at la Natière (St. Malo). With Parks Canada, he has worked on many surveys in Canada, including those in the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve, and L'Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site and the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site. Thierry has a keen interest in public outreach and education. He is a wilderness enthusiast and was looking forward to first encounter with the Arctic.

During the 2010 search for the wreck of HMS Investigator, Thierry oversaw underwater photographic and video documentation.


Henry Cary
Henry Cary
© Parks Canada

HENRY CARY had the opportunity to pursue his life-long fascination with archaeology and history from an early age. At 14 he volunteered as a military musician and historical interpreter at Fort George National Historic Site, Ontario – a position that became a paid summer job for the next six years. In 1996, Henry began a combined undergraduate degree in prehistoric archaeology and social anthropology from Wilfrid Laurier University, which included a semester at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, co-op placements with Parks Canada's Ontario Archaeology Services, and training in physical anthropology at the University of Waterloo.

Henry then earned a Masters' in historical archaeology from Memorial University, where he directed excavations on the site near Makkovik presumed to be the first Moravian mission to the Labrador Inuit. Throughout his university education, as an archaeological consultant, and as a Parks Canada archaeologist, Henry has been fortunate to excavate, survey, and write about a wide variety of prehistoric and historic sites in Ontario, Labrador, Newfoundland, the Northwest Territories, South Africa, and Italy. He is currently writing his PhD dissertation on the archaeology of Fort Henry National Historic Site in Kingston Ontario through the War Studies Department of the Royal Military College of Canada, and lives and works in Inuvik NWT as the cultural resource management officer for Parks Canada's Western Arctic Field Unit. This is Henry's second project in Aulavik National Park, a place of special significance for him as it was there he met his wife Lindsay in 2008. For the 2010 project Henry has coordinated consultations, permitting, contracting, research for the land sites, and aircraft and camp logistics. While in Mercy Bay he directed the archaeological and topographical survey of the land sites, and aided Ed Eastaugh with the magnetometer and metal detector work.

Ed Eastaugh
Edward Eastaugh
© Parks Canada

EDWARD EASTAUGH has been working as an archaeologist for the last 18 years. He graduated from the University of Durham, England in 1992 and spent the following eight years working in Britain on projects associated with the assessment and mitigation of archaeological sites prior to development as well as holding research assistant positions at the universities of Edinburgh and Southampton. He also spent 18 months in the Middle East working as a research assistant at the British Institute for Archaeology and Ancient History in Amman, Jordan as well as various research projects in Jordan, Syria, Libya and India.

In 2000 Edward moved to Canada where he gained his Master's in Archaeology at Memorial University, Newfoundland. After briefly working as an archaeological consultant in Manitoba and Ontario he was hired in 2006 as the Bioarchaeology Lab Manager in the Department of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario. During the last four years he has conducted over 40 gradiometer surveys in Ontario and Peru and has spent the last four summers working in conjunction with Lisa Hodgetts, a faculty member at the University of Western Ontario, to investigate and develop the use of archaeo-geophysical techniques on various archaeological sites in the Canadian Arctic. Ed directed the magnetometer and metal detector survey of the land sites.

Ryan Harris
Ryan Harris
© Parks Canada

RYAN HARRIS was born in Calgary, Alberta. Ryan completed his Bachelor's degree in Anthropology at the University of Toronto. He then studied at East Carolina University, in Greenville North Carolina, where he graduated with his Master's in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology. Working as an underwater archaeologist with Parks Canada since 1999, he took part in more than 50 underwater archaeology projects throughout his career, including the War of 1812 shipwrecks Hamilton and Scourge, an American PBY-5A airplane in Longue-Pointe-de Mingan (Québec), RMS Empress of Ireland (1914) (Québec), 16th-century whaling vessels in Red Bay (Newfoundland and Labrador), the 18th-century French shipwrecks of the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site (Nova Scotia) and of the Battle of the Restigouche National Historic Site (Québec). His professional fields of research include historic ship architecture and remote-sensing applications to archaeological surveys. He has been actively involved in surveys all across Canada, from L'Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site (Newfoundland and Labrador) to Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site (British Columbia), and from Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park (Quebec), to the Rideau Canal and Trent-Severn Waterway National Historic Sites (Ontario). He has also participated in underwater archaeology projects in the United States and in Bermuda. In 2008, Ryan was responsible for Parks Canada for the remote-sensing operations of the archaeological survey to search for the Franklin vessels. In 2010, Ryan directed the underwater search for the wreck of HMS Investigator. He also operated the side-scan sonar survey equipment used in the search and piloted a remotely-operated vehicle.

Joe Kudlak
Neegeonak Abel Joseph Kudlak
© Parks Canada

My name is NEEGEONAK ABEL JOSEPH KUDLAK. I was born on the land on the southside of Minto Inlet which is on Victoria Island. I started with Aulavik National Park in June of 1994 as a seasonal patrolperson. During my time with Parks Canada I have been to Aulavik National Park numerous times. I canoed the Thomsen River, did a zodiac patrol at Mercy Bay, and took part in many projects at Aulavik over the years. Some of the projects that I have taken part in are lemming monitoring, raptor survey, bird surveys, plant surveys, water quality sampling, and archaeological monitoring. I have also been a support staff as wildlife monitor on Parks projects. I aided the land archaeology team and supported John Lucas with camp operations and safety.


John Lucas
John Lucas
© Parks Canada

My name is JOHN LUCAS JR from Sachs Harbour Northwest Territories. I have worked for Parks Canada since 1994, as a patrolperson for Aulavik and Ivvavik National Parks, as well as an ecological technician for the Western Arctic Field Unit. Currently I am the Site Manager for Aulavik National Park. I have a lot of back-country experience on Banks Island. I am also quite knowledgeable with the political aspects of the Western Arctic. I helped coordinate community consultations and project planning, and acted as the project's lead safety and camp operations officer. I also assisted with the land archaeological survey.


Jonathan Moore
Jonathan Moore
© Parks Canada

JONATHAN MOORE was born in Banbury, England, and moved to Kingston, Canada with his family at the age of five. He studied classical studies and archaeology at Queen's University where he received a Bachelor's degree in 1991. While at university he learned to dive and began his involvement in underwater archaeology. He went on to complete a Master's degree in Maritime Studies at the University of St. Andrews, and began his professional career in underwater archaeology in England and Scotland shortly thereafter.

He returned to Canada in 1994 and that year began working with Parks Canada's Underwater Archaeology Service. He has worked on over 50 underwater archaeology projects across Canada on a range of subjects and topics, from historic shipwrecks to submerged prehistoric landscapes and sites. He has directed underwater surveys at a range of sites including, L'Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site of Canada (Newfoundland and Labrador), Rideau Canal National Historic Site of Canada (Ontario) and Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site (British Columbia). He recently directed a 2007-2009 archaeological study of the United States Navy shipwrecks Hamilton and Scourge sunk in 90 meters (300 feet) of water in Lake Ontario in 1813. His professional areas of research and interest include War of 1812 shipwrecks, ship abandonment, submerged paleo-landscapes, the effects of invasive mussel species on underwater cultural resources, archival research and local history. Jonathan was part of the Parks Canada team on the 2008 archaeological survey to search for the Franklin vessels. As part of the underwater search for the wreck of HMS Investigator in 2010, Jonathan helped oversee boat operations.

Leticia Pokiak
Letitia Pokiak
© Parks Canada

My name is LETITIA POKIAK. I'm Inuvialuit and I'm originally from Tuktoyaktuk. I was raised by my grandmother, Lena Pokiak (Igalik). I graduated from Samuel Hearne Secondary School in Inuvik, Northwest Terrtories, before high school was introduced in Tuk. After high school I attended Mount Royal College in Calgary, Alberta, to explore my options. I also attended Red Deer College to further explore my interests. It was with Red Deer College that I had the opportunity to go to Oaxaca Mexico for two months to study the history, culture and language. It was this experience, as well as my passion for my heritage, that inspired me to get into anthropology. I then enrolled and graduated from the University of Alberta of Edmonton in 2003 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology, with a minor in Psychology. I would like to pursue my Masters' in Anthropology one day, when the time is right. I'm a mother of two daughters, who will appreciate their heritage just as their parents do. I enjoy camping, traditional Inuvialuit food, travelling, culture and reading. I would encourage young Aboriginal people to find their passion and pursue their interests, as knowledge is powerful. One of my favourite quotes is: “We must know where we come from, to know where we are going.”